Hardwood sanding tricks on a lathe?? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 10 Old 01-02-2011, 03:14 PM Thread Starter
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Hardwood sanding tricks on a lathe??

i keep getting ''scratches'' that are a pain and time consuming to get out, any tips or tricks? i only make nightsticks on my lathe so that is what im referring to


basically what i do is start with 50 grit on the shaft... 80 on the grip then work my way up as high as i need to but sometimes i have scratches left over from the initial 50/80 grit phase


i use belt sand paper cut so i can slide in under the piece then i stand above it and slide it up and down the length .... for the detail cuts and grooves i use sponges of various grits


am i just being impatient and stop using the 50 grit all together??
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post #2 of 10 Old 01-02-2011, 03:20 PM
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Do you stop the lathe and sand along the length of the stick before moving on to the next grit?

For example, using 50 grit the way you describe, when you're done with that stop the lathe. Then use the 50 grit lengthwise (slowly rotating the lathe by hand while rubbing up & down the stick), aiming to eliminate all the scratches that encircle the stick. Now move up to the next higher grit, and repeat the procedure.

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post #3 of 10 Old 01-02-2011, 03:23 PM
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On very hard wood, I skip the 50 grit because of the same problem.

duncsuss's suggestion is also a good one.

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post #4 of 10 Old 01-02-2011, 03:31 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by duncsuss View Post
Do you stop the lathe and sand along the length of the stick before moving on to the next grit?

nope......i keep the lathe on the entire time at the same speed (fast as it can go)
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post #5 of 10 Old 01-02-2011, 03:35 PM
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Originally Posted by brad2010 View Post
nope......i keep the lathe on the entire time at the same speed (fast as it can go)
Try my suggestion -- I don't claim any credit for the idea, it was taught to me when I took a pen-turning class. It also appears in the book on pen-turning by Barry Gross, and probably many more ... in other words, I think it's "standard operating procedure".

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post #6 of 10 Old 01-02-2011, 03:52 PM Thread Starter
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[QUOTE=duncsuss;172668]Try my suggestion QUOTE]


yup i plan on it ....... thanks for the tip, i appreciate it
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post #7 of 10 Old 01-02-2011, 05:12 PM
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Brad,
Try slowing the lathe to around 1000rpms. Try starting with 150. If you are getting any kind of decent cut on the hard woods you are using, you shouldn't need 50 or 80. Starting with 150, go back and forth across the piece with light pressure, until you have a uniform look. You shouldn't have any deep scratches that stan out from the rest. Then move up to 240 and do the same thing. Continue to 320 then 400. Each step the wood should appear smoother. If you move up a couple of grits and you notice any deeper seated scratches, then you have to back up and go back a grit till you get rid of them. When you are done with the 400, take an old white tube sock that is clean and run it up and down the piece while turning with moderate pressure to kind of burnish the piece. Then proceed with your finish.
One other thing, change out your sandpaper frequently. It gets dull quick.
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post #8 of 10 Old 01-02-2011, 05:49 PM
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Originally Posted by firehawkmph View Post
Brad,
Try slowing the lathe to around 1000rpms. Try starting with 150. If you are getting any kind of decent cut on the hard woods you are using, you shouldn't need 50 or 80. Starting with 150, go back and forth across the piece with light pressure, until you have a uniform look. You shouldn't have any deep scratches that stan out from the rest. Then move up to 240 and do the same thing. Continue to 320 then 400. Each step the wood should appear smoother. If you move up a couple of grits and you notice any deeper seated scratches, then you have to back up and go back a grit till you get rid of them. When you are done with the 400, take an old white tube sock that is clean and run it up and down the piece while turning with moderate pressure to kind of burnish the piece. Then proceed with your finish.
One other thing, change out your sandpaper frequently. It gets dull quick.
Mike Hawkins
If your turning tools are sharp you could start sanding with a much higher grit then you are using. I make pens out of different hard & exotic woods & rarely use less then 600 grit.
Be careful with that tube sock & don't wrap it around your hand. Could get cought & pull you in (seen it happen). Personally I would skip using the sock. Use some 0000 steelwool instead.

James
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post #9 of 10 Old 01-02-2011, 05:56 PM
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For burnishing, I prefer a thick handful of small shavings (but don't get any big pieces; they could mar the surface)

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post #10 of 10 Old 01-02-2011, 07:25 PM
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I agree with some of the other statements. If your tools are sharp, your on the bevel and not forcing the cut, and cutting down hill with the grain you should be able to start much finer than 50.
If you do here is what I do. If it's spindle turning stop between each grit and sand with the grain. It should only take a second.
Slow the lathe down and move the sandpaper constantly and quickly. If you hold it still it makes circular lines. Don't use a lot of pressure. I might start out with pressure but before I'm done with that grit I sand very lightly and quickly. Then sand with the grain.
Blow is off or wipe it off with a rag between each grit. If you don't you can grind 50 grit scratches into the wood with the 80 grit stuff. If you continue to have problems wipe it with Naptha between grits.
I would highly recommend trying different paper. Norton 3X will stop many of your problems if you follow what I wrote above. It is great paper and stays sharp longer.
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