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post #1 of 9 Old 12-12-2010, 11:33 AM Thread Starter
gus
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groovy

my wife makes soap. so one of the things i thought i would make are some dishes i laminated from some scrap. i am then turning the lamination and slicing it into discs. then i am using a fingernail gouge to make recessed grooves in the top surface. initially i have no trouble but when i get fairly close to my desired depth, i catch both edges and all hell breaks loose. no matter how much i try i keep having this problem. so i guess i wonder if there is a better tool for the job. or is it technique i need to work on.

the pic doesn't show it well but there are some gouges where the tool clipped some areas after catching. and that is the tool i'm using.
groovy-img_2601.jpg
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post #2 of 9 Old 12-12-2010, 12:02 PM
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I'm not the expert on this by any means and heck knows I have my own problems with catches. But I'm just wondering if you could use the gouge up to a certain point and then with a round nose scraper, finish off the grooves with light passes. Hopefully, some of the experts will chime in and either agree with me or crush my idea. Either way, we both will learn something.
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post #3 of 9 Old 12-12-2010, 12:07 PM
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You may want to go with a smaller gouge for your finish passes. To me, it also looks like your gouge may not be sharp enough? Could be my eyes or angled shot? Probably my eyes.

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post #4 of 9 Old 12-12-2010, 01:25 PM
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Instead of steadily feeding in the - looks like 3/8" gouge - I'd use a 1/4" gouge and gradually work the cove to the size I wanted.
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post #5 of 9 Old 12-12-2010, 02:11 PM
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I agree, your gouge is too big for that size cove. You should be able to start at one side and cut down toward the middle. Then start at the other side and cut down toward the middle. At no time should both sides touch the gouge edges. If it does you will probably get a catch.
Now you might be able to get away with it if you use it like a scraper. Keep the handle higher than the cutting edge and cut from the high point down to the low point. You can sort of go back and forth from left to right and work your way deeper and you might be successful. You will get more tearout than if you are using the gouge with the bevel rubbing.
A small round nose scraper would be used the same way as above.
With the gouge think of it this way. You start at the left side of the cove with the flute of the gouge pointing about 2 oclock and the bevel rubbing. As you cut from the top down toward the middle you rotate the flute up toward 12 oclock and lift the handle so that when you get to the middle of the cove the flute is straight up. If you lowered the handle far enough it will stop cutting in the middle. The do the same thing from the other side. Make about 4 to 6 passes to get the coves just right. It's sort of like scooping out icecream with a spoon.
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post #6 of 9 Old 12-12-2010, 04:57 PM Thread Starter
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cove not groove. cool, already learned something. thanks guys. i thought the tool was a bit big. i am trying to shape the "cove" from left to right. it just seems like when i get to a certain depth i can't help but rub on both sides. my tool could use a sharpening (something else i am figuring out). but for this size i think a smaller gouge would make this easier. i just have to explain to the wife that we NEED the smaller gouge and scraper.

john,

i think i understand what you mean. but can you define "flute". i tried quickly to figure it out without success. when you say to rotate the flute to 12 oclock from 2 oclock. does this refer to the line created by the top edges of the gouge? sorry, self taught guy here. still figuring out the lingo.
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post #7 of 9 Old 12-12-2010, 11:25 PM
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I'm not a big fan of Cole jaws. Might want to try a glue block or face plate with 2 sided sticky tape, to hold piece more secure.

Jeff,

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Last edited by Jeff4woodturning; 12-12-2010 at 11:28 PM.
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post #8 of 9 Old 12-13-2010, 09:20 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff4woodturning View Post
I'm not a big fan of Cole jaws. Might want to try a glue block or face plate with 2 sided sticky tape, to hold piece more secure.
the cole jaws don't seem to be the problem here. they hold the disk quite nicely. and it rotates smoothly. i have never used the glue block or tape methods though so i can't compare.
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post #9 of 9 Old 12-15-2010, 08:43 PM Thread Starter
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i am getting it figured out. still using the same tool. slower speed, and just taking my time.

now i should probably post this in the Finishing section. but i am wondering about an appropriate finish for a soap dish. obviously it will have quite a bit of contact with water. i was going to try some tung oil but would appreciate some suggestions as this is another area i need to study.
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