Goblets? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 9 Old 12-08-2009, 02:45 PM Thread Starter
Super Member
 
Dvoigt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Fraser, MI
Posts: 781
View Dvoigt's Photo Album My Photos
Goblets?

Ok so I was trying to turn a goblet... I wanted to make it large and I'm making it in the style of this one http://www.woodgoblets.com/index.html only larger. My blank is about 10" long and about 4" square and I think that is what is giving me difficulties because when i remove the tail stock the blank sags slightly. Then I get alot of vibration when I try to hollow it. I tried to drill out some of the inside with a forstener bit, but that wasn't working either. I'm thinking that I would need a steady rest to help support the top.... any suggestions? Anything that I'm missing? Are there any tools that I NEED to make this that fall into the specialty tool category?

Thanks,
D

See what we offer at HandmadeWoodGifts and become a fan of our Facebook page
Dvoigt is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 Old 12-08-2009, 03:08 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Baxter, Tennessee
Posts: 3,257
View john lucas's Photo Album My Photos
If you've got a 10" blank 4" in diameter you've got a lot of wood hanging out there. Turn a tenon on the end that is shorter than your chuck jaws. this creates a shoulder for the jaws to ride on. That should stop any sagging. I turn the cylinder round and turn the tenon between centers. Then when I place the cylinder in the chuck I bring the tailstock up to hold it. This helps align everything.
As far as hollowing. You have to take very small bites to hollow a goblet without excessive chatter unless you have a steady rest. They are quite easy to build using inline skate wheels. I buy the skates at Goodwill for about $5 and then scavenge the wheels off of it.
If you want to try hollowing without the steady try this. Drill to depth, I just use a 3/8" drill but you could use anything. Now instead of hollowing by pulling from the center straight out to the edge try pulling it out at about a 45 degree angle. Pulling straight toward the side creates the most vibration. By cutting from the center out at about 45 degrees or so you are cutting down hill with the grain which cuts cleaner, and the forces tend to me more toward the tailstock which vibrates less.
turn only the large parts of the outside of the goblet. Leave the stem full thickness. This reduces the chatter. When your hollowing gets down toward the bottom of the goblet bowl then you can finish turning the outside of the bowl part and just a little of the stem. then finish the inside of the bowl.
I use my hands to steady the outside as I hollow the inside but this takes practice.
john lucas is offline  
post #3 of 9 Old 12-08-2009, 06:46 PM
Senior Member
 
toolman Steve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Cocoa Fl
Posts: 288
View toolman Steve's Photo Album My Photos
O.m.g. that is beautiful ,It just amazes me what can be done gluing a few peaces of wood together.

Steve M.
toolman Steve is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 9 Old 12-22-2009, 01:11 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Oakley, CA
Posts: 37
View xeddog's Photo Album My Photos
It's been a couple of weeks since anyone posted to this thread so I hope I'm not too late. Anyway, I made a couple of goblets using that staved construction. I wanted to make two of them as a gift for my daughter-in-law's birthday. So I glued up two blanks and went at it. For the woods, I used Lacewood for the center. That was surrounded by maple and purpleheart, and then the outside was some Alder that I had. In my design, I wanted the stems to be a little bit shorter and the goblet bowl to be a little deeper.

When I started this, I had only had a lathe for a few months so I was, in every sense of the word, an newbie. I wonn't go into the details too much, but suffice it to say that my first attempt ended in an exploded bowl. LESSONS: Sharpen more and better. Take lighter cuts.

The second one came out ok. It took me a long time to do because, since I was learning as I went, it took me a while to learn how to hollow the bowl. I was also light in the tool and jig department. My best hollowing tool was a termite, but I did not have any idea how to sharpen it. Had to buy a new cutter and sharpener. And I did not have a steady of any kind (and still don't).

While hollowing I could see the bowl vibrating so badly that the rim was just a blur. The only way I had to steady the bowl was to put on a canvas glove on my left hand and steady it that way. Please don't yell at me about how bad of an idea this was. I know. But my hand kept burning without it, and it allowed me to get the bowl hollowed. Once I had that done, the rest was "easy" compared.

The third blank that I glued up started out ok, but I made another newbie mistake. I turned the bowl too thin just at the point where the bottom curve starts to straighten out and come up the sides. It didn't come apart, but the goblet would not have been able to hold water it was so thin. So I had to glue up a fourth blank and by now my selection was becoming more limited. That is why one of the boglets in the photo has some defects in it. I was able to use all the lessons I learned from the previous three and got the second goblet completed.

Once they were done there are one or two things that I wish I had done a little differently. I might not have made them quite so deep, and I think I would have tapered the top and bottom of the stems a little more to show more of the staves. Not sure about that one because I did want the lacewood to show. But overall I am satisfied with the way they came out.

Take John's advice and have some fun. If you have already done them, let's see some pics.

xeddog
Attached Images
 
xeddog is offline  
post #5 of 9 Old 12-22-2009, 01:14 PM Thread Starter
Super Member
 
Dvoigt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Fraser, MI
Posts: 781
View Dvoigt's Photo Album My Photos
I ran out of time to get it done for Christmas, so now it will get pushed back as a birthday present... so give me a couple months.


What finish did you use on yours?

See what we offer at HandmadeWoodGifts and become a fan of our Facebook page
Dvoigt is offline  
post #6 of 9 Old 12-22-2009, 02:52 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Oakley, CA
Posts: 37
View xeddog's Photo Album My Photos
For a finish, I wanted something that wouldn't change the color of the Alder. I wanted it to stay as light as possible. I tried a couple of things on some samples including oil based polyurethane, tung oil, BLO, and a couple of others. I wound up just using a water based Polyurethane because it had the least amount of color change in the wood.

xeddog
xeddog is offline  
post #7 of 9 Old 12-22-2009, 09:13 PM
Senior Member
 
toolman Steve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Cocoa Fl
Posts: 288
View toolman Steve's Photo Album My Photos
I saw a program on TV Where the guy turned the cilender first then he driled out the inside than finished turning it . then he made a tight fitting blank to fit it, turned it around in the chuck and finished the outside stem and base it worked well for him.

Steve M.
toolman Steve is offline  
post #8 of 9 Old 12-23-2009, 12:14 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Oakley, CA
Posts: 37
View xeddog's Photo Album My Photos
I thought about doing something like that, but I felt that my sidewalls were too thin for any compression fit like that. I had to finish a goodly part of the bottom by hand. Well . . .I don't know if I HAD to, but I did.

xeddog
xeddog is offline  
post #9 of 9 Old 12-23-2009, 03:01 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Baxter, Tennessee
Posts: 3,257
View john lucas's Photo Album My Photos
Turn most of the goblet cup but leave the stem and base almost full thickness. As you shape the cup remove wood down toward the stem but leave it at least 1" thick with the rest of the stem still full thickness.
Then hollow the inside. When you get down toward the bottom of the cup you can further shape the outiside and just a little of the stem in order to give yourself some clearance to finish the shape of the cup. Then finish hollowing and sanding the inside and outside.
Now work on the stem. I work it down an inch or two at a time leaving the bulk of the stem thicker than it needs to be. I will gradually thin out the stem working from the cup to the base until I have the whole stem done.
If you get excess wobble at the cup end try putting something like a soft ball on the tailstock that just touches the cup. You don't want to put any pressure on it you just want to remove some of the wobble. I tried a tennis ball but it's too easy to apply too much pressure. Of course that was on a thin stem goblet. With a thicker goblet you might get away with it.
Then turn the base and thin out the wood below the bottom until there is about 1/2" or so tenon. I use the toe of the skew to turn the bottom. It makes an excellent tool to hollow it out slightly so it's concave. A shallow ground spindle gouge will sometimes work.
My best freind doesn't turn the bottom at all. He sands it. I cuts it off and goes to the disc sander. He says if you rotate it 4 times and touch it lightly you will keep it square so the cup sits correctly.
That's how I do my goblets. Hope it helps.
john lucas is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Banksia Pod Goblets john lucas Woodturning 5 06-09-2008 02:08 PM
Purpleheart Goblets Crazybear Woodturning 3 09-04-2007 02:39 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome