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post #1 of 11 Old 01-10-2010, 03:27 PM Thread Starter
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Question Gluing

I'm new to woodworking and am starting on the lathe. I know this probably sounds like a bad idea, but my husband is a carpenter/woodworker and I've learned a lot from him and I'm an artist, so I've done other forms of sculpture before.

In any case, here's my question: I would like to start with a small, simple bowl and will be using a faceplate. I'd like to glue a scrap on to the bottom with the paper in the middle, just as I've read in so many online tutorials, so I don't bore screws into my finished piece. I have 2 questions:

1) What's the best glue to use?
2) The blocks of exotic wood I received for Christmas are covered in a wax. Is there an easy way to remove this so the glue will adhere? Or do I need to plane it down?

TIA,

~L
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post #2 of 11 Old 01-10-2010, 07:23 PM
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Hi L,

1) What's the best glue to use?

Some use CA but I prefer Titebond. Here's a good article on waste blocks. Wally knows what he's doing.
http://www.sazwa.org/WasteBlock.pdf

2) The blocks of exotic wood I received for Christmas are covered in a wax. Is there an easy way to remove this so the glue will adhere? Or do I need to plane it down?

Will you be using a bandsaw to round the block? If so, I would just round it, mount it between centers, and turn a flat surface for your glue block. The wax will be gone within seconds. You'll have to remove the small nub left by your tailstock but it will be easier than planing the entire block (IMO).
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post #3 of 11 Old 01-10-2010, 08:11 PM
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Hi L.
It really won't matter what brand of glue you use. Years ago as a kid in Jr. HS we used Elmers white glue because that was what was available to us and it was the first of it's type on the market made from a milk base product. I still use Elmers wood glue and Titebond on occasions. Can't really tell the difference between the two.Go with the one that has the best price at the time of purchase and it usually is Elmers. you can't go wrong with either. Also Elmers white still works.When you turn the wood blank the wax will go away. Good luck.
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post #4 of 11 Old 01-10-2010, 11:38 PM
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I have used the paper joint ( brown paper bag ) and titebond glue without any problems.
One way to remove the wax coating is to mount your faceplate on the concave side of the bowl and take a cut off the bottom.

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post #5 of 11 Old 01-11-2010, 10:06 AM Thread Starter
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Talking Thanks!

Thanks for all the responses! I started turning my first piece last night! I'm turning a bangle bracelet right now. The grain has a few very small voids. I've read that its good to fill these with CA glue. Will Titebond or Elmers Wood Glue work just the same? I ask because 1) my husband buys Elmers by the gallon, so that would be easiest for me and 2) if Elmers isn't good, I'd like to buy the right stuff on the first shot.

(I'm going to attempt to attach a pic of the bracelet so far. Haven't done this on these boards before. Hopefully I did it right!)
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post #6 of 11 Old 01-13-2010, 08:02 PM
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[quote=HLW;112377]Hi L.
It really won't matter what brand of glue you use.

Sorry,
But that is totally incorrect. It does matter- if you do staved construction or segmented- you need a glue that will not surface set before all the stave's/segments are in place and bound/clamped . Tight-bond II or III is the proper glue to use for a bonding agent. if you want to deviate and use Elmer's - I hope you like the taste of wood and some pain to go with it. And wear some safety gear- shield - or install a shield on your lathe- been there done that.

As far as your wax- if your segmenting pieces, scrape off as much as possible- take a heat gun and some paper towels - heat the remaining wax up and use the PT's to absorb the rest (with out the gun on the wood) - trim on your TS - then glue the segments together , if not segmented - 1 individual piece turning, then do the same process , no TS needed to trim and your ready to turn-
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post #7 of 11 Old 01-14-2010, 08:02 AM
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Hi L.

Not quite sure what method,steps or techniques Bweick7 uses when he glues and clamps segmented or stave construction but I've been turning for about 45 years and have never encountered the issues he is talking about when using Elmers glue? Again, I've used both and in the end I have gotten the same results. Good luck.
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post #8 of 11 Old 01-14-2010, 09:24 AM
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Post It does matter!!!!

If you can use any glue then I guess the answer to this ( IYO) is -"it doesn't matter" please read this article HLM- There are reasons for using different glues for different applications ,spices,use,and climate - at the time after completion, may be fine- but later ,it may not look so fine anymore ~ http://www.woodcentral.com/russ/russ6.shtml .
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post #9 of 11 Old 01-14-2010, 11:15 AM
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I agree also. I used Elmers for years. I changed to Titebond because I liked the glue tips better and it didn't seem to run. When gluing end grain to end grain the problem is glue soaking into the wood which can starve the joint. This can happen with almost any glue although thick bodied glues like some epoxies don't do it as bad.
To glue up your bracelets you could use any of the PVA glues (titebond and Elmers are the most popular), Polyeurethane (like Gorilla glue) or epoxies.
For general segmented glue ups, grain direction and wood movement are the two issues that cause a joint to fail as long as you use enough glue and have a tight joint.
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post #10 of 11 Old 01-15-2010, 10:07 AM Thread Starter
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Question

Thanks for all the info!

I'm happy to report that my cheap-o lathe has a cheap-o 4 jaw chuck that I'm ordering today, so I won't have to worry too much about gluing on waste blocks. Yay!

My question now is this: What's best for filling cracks without looking hideous? Again, this, for right now, will be for bracelets. I'm not delving into anything bigger for awhile yet.
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post #11 of 11 Old 01-15-2010, 10:43 AM
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I fill cracks a lot of ways. sometimes I'll sand and let the dust fill the crack, then apply my finish. This only works if you have a drying type finish that tends to build. Oil finishes seem to suck the saw dust back out.
I have done the same thing as above but applied thin CA glue to the dust. If you aren't really careful with the application it can leave a sort of stain on the unfinished wood. I use some special tips I bought from somewhere (don't remember where) that have 1.5mm tips.
If it's a larger crack I fill with sawdust and use either thin CA or if necessary medium CA. If your not familiar with CA it is Cyanoacrelate adhesive commonly known as Crazy glue except we use the industrial grades that you can buy from Woodcraft and other woodturning supply houses.
If the crack is really large you can fill it with all sorts of things from crushed turquoise to coffee depending on how you want to accent the crack. Then fill with medium CA or if it's really bad use a thin clear epoxy.
You can mix oil paints with epoxy to color it and fill cracks. I use alcohol based black shoe dye to color 5 minute epoxy and fill the medium sized cracks. Leaves a nice black line.
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