First 'real' catch. - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 07-16-2015, 07:29 PM Thread Starter
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First 'real' catch.

Left Rockler, yesterday, with two pieces of stock for turning bowls. One, was a block of Mahogany (about 3"x5") for $5. The second, is a block of wood which was about 6"x4". I don't know it's name, but it had a waxed outer (almost rubbery), which I picked up for about $7. When I reached home I started in on the Mahogany. It was my FIRST time turning a bowl, and I knew that I didn't have the proper chisels (not even the best in those that I DID have), but I was so anxious to give it a shot.

Now, let me get to the catch. I had experienced a few minor catches before, and I committed myself to not doing, again, what had been done to cause the catch.

I had secured my piece on the faceplate, after rounding the stock on my band saw. I'd given it a simple shaping, as well as a footed recessed area for my chuck's dovetailed jaws. I decided to give it a little deeper shaping, when I got caught - and caught GOOD . I heard this noise, and then saw the very fast, blurred movement of something flying away from me. Yep, my bowl was gone - leaving the screws dangling from the faceplate.

I won't deny that I was a bit shaken, and will admit that I cannot remember what action I had employed to bring about THAT catch. Improper/dull cutting edges? improper technique? Wrong chisel selected? Well, it is quite possibly a combination of ALL THREE.

I am now in search of a good video tutorial which will instruct the usage of woodturning tools; what each one is, and the proper way in which to use it. I need to know that information, FIRST, before I even think of trying to shell out for more chisels.

I just finished making myself two parting knives, and I know that I will need a bowl chisel. But THAT one will be the only one that I buy, before I get myself armed with the knowledge that I seek.

As far as the bowl is concerned - well, it looks more like an ash tray . There are a bunch of mistakes on it, and I will post pictures on it, soon. Hopefully, they will be clear enough for you to see WHY those mistakes were made.

Thanks for reading this.
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post #2 of 12 Old 07-16-2015, 07:48 PM
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go on Youtube and search for john60lucas. He is a very informative man that does nothing but bowl turning and is a nice fellow that is willing to help out in anyway he can. I myself have learned a lot from his videos
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post #3 of 12 Old 07-16-2015, 09:48 PM
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My videos are pretty good but I haven't done one on bowl turning or use of the bowl gouge yet. I do explain what many of the tools are and how to sharpen them.
I would highly suggest Lyle Jamieson's videos on Youtube. He covers a lot of subjects very well.
There are a lot of bad videos out there but his and mine are at least accurate in how most of us use tools.
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post #4 of 12 Old 07-16-2015, 10:08 PM
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There are lots of good one out there on youtube and of course a lot not so good.
I'm not sure where you want to start but I would suggest starting with spindle orientation. One reason is that you may have catches but they are usually not nearly as dramatic as with a bowl.
For any turning I suggest "stance" as the first study... it makes everything else so much easier.
For spindle I can link you to vids by Raffan and Stemp on understanding why you get a catch.
John here has some very good ones on most all spindle tools (parting, gouge, skew) in particular.

You said....."I am now in search of a good video tutorial which will instruct the usage of woodturning tools; what each one is, and the proper way in which to use it."

Ain't no such thing as all inclusive. Not trying to be negative. I have been turning about 6 years and learn new techniques all the time. I probably have 24 videos and watched hundreds on youtube, they each bring one more piece of the puzzle.
To cover what you ask, the only one I can think of off-hand is "Woodturning, A Foundation Course" by Keith Rowley. But it is not on youtube.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin
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post #5 of 12 Old 07-16-2015, 10:26 PM
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Here's a pretty decent short video by Raffan on catches in general and how to understand why they happen.

I'm a fan of Raffan's no-nonsense approach to turning in a lot of respects, and I particularly like that in his videos there always seem to be at least one small train wreck, either an unintended catch, as here, or something spectacular like an entire bowl flying across the room.
He's not everyone's cup of tea by a long shot, but he sure does know what he's talking about.

Last edited by 9thousandfeet; 07-16-2015 at 10:31 PM.
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post #6 of 12 Old 07-16-2015, 10:38 PM Thread Starter
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I Thank everyone for responding.

@NC, I took no offense at the first sentence of your last paragraph. You did nothing more than to state a fact. I should've known better, anyway, for even thinking that there might e something out there to take me from A to Z, regarding turning tools and technique for using each one. You mentioned something about the less-than-dramatic catches sometimes brought on by spindle turnings. I know what you mean, because I did experience a few, turning some spindles, just shortly before trying bowl turning.

It'll come, though. I am SURE of that.

I know that I am going to have to search, also, for instructions on the proper stance to adopt.
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post #7 of 12 Old 07-17-2015, 09:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NLAlston View Post
I know that I am going to have to search, also, for instructions on the proper stance to adopt.
Here is a link to video's by Stuart Batty. There are three on stance, one on spindle and two on bowls IIRC. Most are 10-15 minutes. He has videos others seldom touch on except in passing such as tool overhang. Excellent teacher giving details on very specific practices.
https://vimeo.com/woodturning/videos...rmat:thumbnail

Many other videos do mention stance (often not by name) but to me it gets a little lost in watching the wood being cut.
John mentioned Lyle Jamieson (youtube) and I know that he mentions it and show sthe movement but it is a small take in a much larger video. I'm fairly confident that if the camera angle showed the entire body you would see in John's youtube videos the same movement with the SRG, skew, spindle gouge, etc.

I'm sure the folks here can suggest videos on almost any specific tool or topic presented by excellent turners.

They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety. Benjamin Franklin
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post #8 of 12 Old 07-17-2015, 11:07 AM
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NL,
I always recommend new turners try and find a turning club in there area. Even if it's an hour or more away. You will be able to get a lot of hands on instruction, see some live demos, examine other members work on the show and tell table, and most importantly, learn the correct usage of tools. Unlearning bad habits takes a lot longer and can be dangerous. Bowls are not the simple projects they appear to be. If you don't understand how to sharpen your tools, proper usage of each type, and the do's and don'ts of each, a bowl should be put on the waiting list. Spindle projects are a good area to get started in. Safer, fun, and good tool control can be learned where you can see exactly what you're doing. Videos only go so far, having someone show you is much better.
Mike Hawkins
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post #9 of 12 Old 07-17-2015, 04:06 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NCPaladin View Post
Here is a link to video's by Stuart Batty. There are three on stance, one on spindle and two on bowls IIRC. Most are 10-15 minutes. He has videos others seldom touch on except in passing such as tool overhang. Excellent teacher giving details on very specific practices.
https://vimeo.com/woodturning/videos...rmat:thumbnail

Many other videos do mention stance (often not by name) but to me it gets a little lost in watching the wood being cut.
John mentioned Lyle Jamieson (youtube) and I know that he mentions it and show sthe movement but it is a small take in a much larger video. I'm fairly confident that if the camera angle showed the entire body you would see in John's youtube videos the same movement with the SRG, skew, spindle gouge, etc.

I'm sure the folks here can suggest videos on almost any specific tool or topic presented by excellent turners.
Had a moment to look at a couple of those videos, and really liked what I saw. So much, so, that I have just downloaded the Vimeo Downloader, to grab ALL of them and put them on my Ipad. Thank you, so much.
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post #10 of 12 Old 07-18-2015, 09:28 AM
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The first thing I ever turned on my lathe was a handle for the set of carbide tools I'm making because I wasn't about to pay $100+ for a tool I can make for about $25. The problem was, I didn't have any proper lathe tools to make that first handle so I ended up using a razor sharp vintage stanley chisel with a straight blade much like the one pictured below.



It took about 15 seconds to find out the hard way how not to angle the blade, but after that scare things went smoothly. Once I got that first tool done, things have been smooth sailing. I'm really impressed how user friendly these carbide tools are in both spindle work and hollowing. The three tools I've made so far all have 14" two position handles. The first (pictured below) uses both square and square-radius cutters, and the others use the round and diamond cutter.

Here's the first one I made:



I'll post photos of the others this afternoon. The round cutter tool I made second is especially nice because I made the handle out of East Indian Rosewood. And no... I lucked out and didn't have an allergic reaction.
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post #11 of 12 Old 07-19-2015, 04:28 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Andrew LB View Post
The first thing I ever turned on my lathe was a handle for the set of carbide tools I'm making because I wasn't about to pay $100+ for a tool I can make for about $25. The problem was, I didn't have any proper lathe tools to make that first handle so I ended up using a razor sharp vintage stanley chisel with a straight blade much like the one pictured below.



It took about 15 seconds to find out the hard way how not to angle the blade, but after that scare things went smoothly. Once I got that first tool done, things have been smooth sailing. I'm really impressed how user friendly these carbide tools are in both spindle work and hollowing. The three tools I've made so far all have 14" two position handles. The first (pictured below) uses both square and square-radius cutters, and the others use the round and diamond cutter.

Here's the first one I made:



I'll post photos of the others this afternoon. The round cutter tool I made second is especially nice because I made the handle out of East Indian Rosewood. And no... I lucked out and didn't have an allergic reaction.
Andrew, thanks for this information.

You know, I had been looking at (quite possiblly) moving in the direction of carbide turning tools, also. I'd received some knowledge on them being more forgiving than the conventional turning tools, but that they render the same degree of smoothness with their cuts. Now, I don't know just how true that is, because the varying quality of their cutting results just might be an issue with the user - and HOW he/she might have been using them. With cutter sharpening not being a concern, with carbides (as well as their much lengthier life expectancy), it would seem that creating a working association with them is a no-brainer.

Outside of that, allow me to ask you a question. Not knowing much else about the carbide turning tools, am I correct in assuming that all that one would need is a handle, a blade holding bar - and that they could attach ANY carbide cutter to it? Of course, more than one handle could be turned (as I WOULD do) as well as another bar being purchased. But I was just wondering.

I have been watching videos like crazy, of late, with some of them showing such cutters in use. I, personally, am impressed with what I have seen.
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post #12 of 12 Old 07-19-2015, 04:39 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andrew LB View Post
The first thing I ever turned on my lathe was a handle for the set of carbide tools I'm making.
Wait a minute (I kinda glossed over your first sentence), are you saying that you're making the carbide tool sets - entirely? And not just their handles? If that is the case, please share your process to be involved.

Advanced thanks,
Nathan

UPDATE:

I just searched YouTube, and found a video on the full construction of a carbide tool. I make reference to this one: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YGC7UL0msCM.

So, this will be my next project.

Last edited by NLAlston; 07-19-2015 at 05:24 AM. Reason: Updated info.
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