finally figured out the bowl gouge - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 9 Old 11-07-2009, 04:43 PM Thread Starter
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finally figured out the bowl gouge

This my third attempt at a bowl, the first 2 were dangerous failures as I couldn't quite get the hang of the bowl gouge. The wall thickness is ok, not as uniform as i would have liked. But I was so close to finishing i didn't want to take the chance of getting a catch and destroying the bowl.

I sanded to 320... twice... because the end grain looked rough. It all felt and look smooth, so I put some BLO on the bowl and instantly got some mahogany dust in the end grain of the maple.... that was unexpected. I'm not going to fix it because my wife just that that would a coloring in the maple. But how do i make sure that this doesn't happen again?

Thanks
D
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post #2 of 9 Old 11-07-2009, 05:20 PM
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Dv,
When you are using a light wood and dark wood together, you have to sand to at least 400. In doing so, you have to make sure you get rid of all the imperfections with the roughest grit before moving on. It also helps if you have a dust collector or shop vac hose next to the wood drawing the dust away while sanding. And finally, use an air nozzle to blow the piece off before putting a finish on. Keep practicing with the bowl gouge, it usually takes more than a few bowls to get it right. Patience is the key.
Mike Hawkins
Ps, I have some cigar bands to send you. I stopped up to see my buddy. I'll put them in the mail for you.
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post #3 of 9 Old 11-07-2009, 06:23 PM
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Nice job for a first bowl. All you need to do now is keep pumping the bowls etc out as much as you can. Practice is what will make you a good turner and you will get used to that bowl gouge real soon. Putting a nice finish on is another story.Mike gave you some good advice. When I want to make an exceptional finish on a small turning I sometimes go all the way up to 2000 grit. Only reason I am telling you that is because you have a light and dark wood combined and if you did go up above 2000 grit you would be using sand paper used on cars and they would dirty up the light wood.If your going to put several coats of a finish such as varnish or lacquer you don't even need to go up higher than 230grit. Make sure you get all the scratch marks out on your low grit sand paper you start with. Most don't do this so the finish isn't as good. Good luck. Mitch

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post #4 of 9 Old 11-07-2009, 07:22 PM
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Good job on the bowls. When I have to sand light and dark wood together I use sanding sealer, usually lacquer sanding sealer. I put some on the wood before I sand. It helps fill in the pores so they don't get sanding dust in them. I apply more sealer between each grit. You need to blow or wipe out any dust before applying more sealer. The downside to this is it tends to clog the sandpaper.
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post #5 of 9 Old 11-07-2009, 10:29 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firehawkmph View Post
Ps, I have some cigar bands to send you. I stopped up to see my buddy. I'll put them in the mail for you.
Sweet thanks, you have my address?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mitch Cholewinski
All you need to do now is keep pumping the bowls etc out as much as you can.
Done and done.... I really enjoyed turning the bowl especially when the tool is fresh off the grinder.

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post #6 of 9 Old 11-07-2009, 10:46 PM
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DV,
I have your address.

One more thing to add to what John Lucas said. We had our club meeting today and had Jamie Donaldson from Kentucky as our featured demonstrator. One of the things he does is to use lacquer thinned about 10-20% with acetone. He brushes it on areas that are either experiencing tearout, or areas that are punky (soft). It stiffens up the fibers and lets you take a light shear cut with your bowl gouge and clean up the wood nicely to eliminate heavy sanding. This would also help with your light/dark wood problem.
Mike Hawkins
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post #7 of 9 Old 11-10-2009, 08:46 AM Thread Starter
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Would adding a sanding sealer or thinned lacquer affect the woods ability to take an oil finish?

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post #8 of 9 Old 11-10-2009, 09:29 AM
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Jamie is a good friend of mine. I was hoping to go and visit him in Dec. but it isn't going to happen. I use lacquer thinned 50/50 with lacquer thinner. It penetrates the punky wood better. I don't use an oil finish so I can't answer your question. The oil won't penetrate but it will probably go over the lacquer. I have used Minwax wipe on poly over the thinned lacquer.
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post #9 of 9 Old 11-10-2009, 11:40 PM
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DV,
I don't use an oil finish either. I use mostly lacquer. If you are worried about food safe, once it cures and the smell goes away, it is safe, same with varnish and oil based poly.
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