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post #1 of 10 Old 02-04-2009, 10:54 PM Thread Starter
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evil tool

I bought a hollowing tool from woodcraft that has a tiny carbide wheel on the end. it cuts fast and smoothe but also grabs and digs. I am tearing up every piece I turn. It grabs so hard it pulls bowls out of the jaws flinging them and shattering the pieces. What is the secret to using those tools? It grabbed one bowl so hard the tool rest snapped off.
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post #2 of 10 Old 02-04-2009, 11:15 PM
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Watch the video I produced on youtube on how to use the Hunter tool. There are other techniques but I haven't had the time to make a video on those techniques yet.
http://www.youtube.com/user/john59lucas
Feel free to ask questions. The reason the tool grabs is either you are using it flat, or you are not on the bevel of the tool. You can use it as a scraper by tilting it far to the side like I do on the final part of the bowl turning section.
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post #3 of 10 Old 02-04-2009, 11:30 PM
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Bruce,
Follow John's advice. I have to give you an 'A' for effort, though. When you are having trouble with a tool, especially one that is not a traditional category type tool, stop at the first mishap and figure out why it happened. If it happens again right away, then you didn't come up with the right solution. At this point for your own safety, stop using the tool until you can definitely pinpoint the problem. It usually boils down to an incorrect angle on the presentation. Anytime you break a tool rest, that's a chance for a major injury. Please be careful, if not, it tends to take the fun out of it.
Mike Hawkins
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post #4 of 10 Old 02-04-2009, 11:31 PM
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Nice video John, how clean of a cut does it produce? Meaning, after you make the cut can you sand with 220 paper to start?

Vince
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post #5 of 10 Old 02-05-2009, 12:04 AM
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John that is a helpful video, thanks
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post #6 of 10 Old 02-05-2009, 09:51 AM
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It can cut very very clean, depending on how you use it. Tilted to the side, rubbing the bevel and not forcing the cut you can easily start with 220. I've made cuts that don't need sanding bit I usually do out of habit. On some boxes I don't even bother to sand the interior.
In the shear scrape mode you do have to sand but I can often get it to 220 or close.
The biggest problem with the tool is tool control. If you don't control it carefully enough the finsh of the tool is extremely good but you might have tiny ridges from not moving the tool smoothly enough. Use your body for better tool control and you can get an incredible finish.
I don't use this tool for roughing or shaping because it's slower than my bowl gouge. I save it for finishing cuts or problem areas.
I have made my own ornament hollowing tools out of the #1 cutter and I do all of the inside with these.
I also use them to do box interiors because they cut endgrain so well.
I did a video showing pen turning with them but I don't recommend that. Although they work I think there are better tools to do that job.
I do like them for hollowing. I use the #1 cutters in different bars on my boring bars. They cut fast when you have them at a slight angle, and then adjust them for more of a shear cut and you can clean up the sides of hollow vessels extremely well.
One of the best uses is the cleaning up the little nub in the bottom of hollow vessels and vases. I turn the cutter 45 degrees to the right and cut from about an inch to the left of the nub back to center. I can use the cutter in this fashion to clean up the whole bottom of vases and not have to sand much if at all.
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post #7 of 10 Old 02-06-2009, 05:42 PM Thread Starter
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Unhappy

I broke the same bowl 4 times and glued it back together, determined to get it right. I was finally able to "finish" the piece with all the scars of crazy glue and a glass smooth finish. I'll retry using a second piece of the same wood and make another bowl like the first to have a before and after. I used the hunter tool to hollow the bowl form but I also found shaping and finishing easy to do with one tool. I am going to hunt for some carbide and find a different shape tool that resists twisting. I think because the blank was "wet" the wood allowed the cutter to plow. It sure does remove wood in a hurry but the transition from fast work to finish work was too much of a gear shift for my experience level. The tool was pulled into the morse bit and cut the metal when I tried to cut close. I think the tool twists and I may try another with flat sides, forgot the name but looks like the hunter and comes without a handle. I'm running out of cheap wood and too afraid to use burls so I have to get some roadside wood to practice more.
Thanks for the video tip, it showed me my problem, I was trying to smooth cut and had the angle wrong. I am very impressed the the sharp cutting of the little wheel on the hunter tool. It is a pleasure to use until it bites the piece.
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post #8 of 10 Old 02-06-2009, 07:20 PM
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It's called the Eliminator and has exactly the same problems the Hunter tool will unless you control it. It does have flat side which help you orient the tool correctly but it can roll quite easily so and dig in.
It's up to you to keep the tools in the proper orientation. You can use the Hunter anywhere from about 40 degrees to almost 80 degrees tilt. My suggestion is to put a scrap piece of wood on the lathe, kind of like a platter. Then just play with the different angles after watching the first part of my video. I won't take very long to find the bevel of the tool and gain control over the cut. You'll see the coolest shavings coming off the wood.
Wet wood wasn't the cause of your problems. It was presenting the tool to the wood without the bevel rubbing.
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post #9 of 10 Old 02-07-2009, 03:05 PM Thread Starter
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I'll try the platter work, sounds like a great way to gain experience. I watched the video a few times now, wish it had better resolution, but I can follow the demo. I like bowls and feel I can do the whole thing with the hunter tool after some practice.
Thanks
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post #10 of 10 Old 02-07-2009, 08:39 PM
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I'm still learning about resolution on Youtube. I'm not a computer person or videographer. I'm a still photographer so this is all new to me. When I get time I'm going to do another short Hunter tool video and try to improve all the quality.
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