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post #1 of 8 Old 05-05-2013, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
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Dry wood

I'm turning a block of wood and it seems really dry and hard. Has anyone tried raising the moisture in wood by storing it in high humid container for a while. Would that work? Just curious.
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post #2 of 8 Old 05-05-2013, 04:07 PM
Yea i got wood
 
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why?
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post #3 of 8 Old 05-05-2013, 04:18 PM Thread Starter
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To soften it up to turn more easily
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post #4 of 8 Old 05-05-2013, 04:23 PM
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I would not try to force moisture into the wood. Likely to warp either now or as the new moisture is lost.

I recently turned a cherry platter. This was the driest cherry I have turned so far.

I just accepted the wood and turned on my dust collector and air cleaner.

Sharp tools are desired whether the wood is soft, hard, wet or dry.

Hard just means more frequent sharpening.
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post #5 of 8 Old 05-05-2013, 04:42 PM
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yea i was assuming that was why but like dave said you would be asking for cracking or warping if you did that
just keep the tools sharp and clean cuts
good luck
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post #6 of 8 Old 05-05-2013, 06:25 PM
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My question also is Why. Just sharpen your tools. I have cut just about the hardest woods you can buy and dry as all get out. They all cut with sharp tools. Some do dull tools faster so they need sharpening more often. If your having to push the tool it's dull. Sharp tools should cut easily no matter what wood, they just cut slower with smaller shavings on really hard wood.
The worst wood I ever turned was Oak barnwood. I'm guessing the silica from many many years of exposure to the weather dulled the tools. I was making hand mirrors and one pass across the face of that 5 1/2" square would dull the tool to the point it almost wouldn't cut. I sharpened after each pass. After about 3 passes the wood cut like most other hard woods.
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post #7 of 8 Old 05-05-2013, 08:37 PM
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[QUOTE=Tfoster100;474243
....... Has anyone tried raising the moisture in wood by storing it in high humid container for a while. .....[/QUOTE]

I seriously doubt it. It might help a little on the surface but I suspect it wont penetrate very deep, at least not for a ling while.
Most of the moisture in living trees or recently cut trees is moisture sucked up the tubes by the tree itself, trying to feed itself. The moisture in the 'tubes' or veins takes a while to dry and the moisture within the cell walls takes even longer to dry. By adding humidity, you are reversing the process and you cant suck the moisture bake into the veins,
I do not speak from actual botanical knowledge, but I did sleep in the Holiday Inn last night. At least it sounds almost logical.

Tony B Retired woodworker, among other things.


"Strive for excellence and settle for completion" Tony B
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post #8 of 8 Old 05-05-2013, 11:32 PM
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I agree with keep it dry. Why bring in a warpage or crack likelihood when you don't need to?
I turn both and much prefer dryer.
Besides moist or green wood adds to a rust problem with lathes and tools and might complicate your finishing plans.
Jus' my 0.02
Dave H

Dave Hill

Everyday--learning to liberate nice things from ordinary chunks of wood
and I like gnarly wood--outcome is always better than the start.
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