Chucks and rust - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 31 Old 04-30-2014, 08:41 AM
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Rust is cancer for plain carbon and many alloyed steels. Your geographic location and the climate where your tools are stored will have a lot to do with how quickly the cancer spreads.

The good news is that we are living in an era where there are a lot of ways to protect against rust, and even convert rust to a passive material if needed.

I am a Metallurgical Engineer by profession, which is not any attempt to impress anyone, but to be clear that I work with and try to understand the behavior of metals on a daily basis.

There are a lot of good rust-proofing techniques available, some simple, and some sophisticated. Something as common as plain old WD-40 is hard to beat from a cost-to-performance basis.

Steve.
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post #22 of 31 Old 04-30-2014, 10:19 AM
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I keep my chucks and other tools in cardboard boxes in a drawer. I like to wrap them in VCI paper that we use at work as we manufacture steel components for cnc machines. It's always worked for the company to prevent rust, good enough for my tools at home. And I don't have to wipe off anything!
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post #23 of 31 Old 05-01-2014, 02:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Manuka Jock View Post
'struth , who has time to do that ?

A scroll chuck would have to be stripped down and all parts individually cleaned , same with a lathe. That would take forever , and still not get rid of all of the infection .
Well, only one part of a scroll saw touches the wood, same with a lathe. Clean those parts and youre golden, though like i said, my proposed options are more in the mindset of extended storage, periods of months with out use or so. Personally, id gladly take and hour every couple of months to strip and clean my tools if it meant to parts made of solid rust. That being said, if this is a long weekend storage scenario my ideas were idiotic
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post #24 of 31 Old 05-01-2014, 03:02 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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I use this

It's the greatest!
http://michigancenteroutdoors.com/gibbs.html

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 05-01-2014 at 03:05 AM.
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post #25 of 31 Old 05-01-2014, 05:53 AM
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Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
Well, only one part of a scroll saw touches the wood, same with a lathe. Clean those parts and youre golden,
The hands that touch the chuck , any part of the chuck , touch the wood , and that silicone transfers like a virus .
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post #26 of 31 Old 05-01-2014, 02:30 PM
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The hands that touch the chuck , any part of the chuck , touch the wood , and that silicone transfers like a virus .
Fair point, I forget that most people aren't as compulsive as me
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post #27 of 31 Old 05-28-2014, 07:23 PM
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I swear by CRC Lanocote spray, sold for marine use, but is ideal on any bare steel surface to protect from rust while in storage, or while in use in less than ideal conditions.. first heard about it at a medieval reenactment event...when someone in full plate armour got caught in a shower of rain, having previously treated their armour with it--dried off the bulk of the water and that was it, no rust issues.
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post #28 of 31 Old 06-12-2014, 05:34 PM
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rust removing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Miller Woodworks View Post
I do a lot of traveling for work and have had times where I spend months at a time away from home. Unfortunately, that's less than ideal for tools and I've noticed that my chucks and tools tend to rust a bit despite spraying them down with a lubricating oil before leaving.

Is there a good way to keep things from rusting during my longer assignments?
I just watched a video from woodcraft, the product he was showing was called (Bora restore/rust remover) he claims his product is environmently friendly and only reacts to steel and once applied works for years. Might be just what your looking for.
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post #29 of 31 Old 06-13-2014, 03:36 PM
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I put my chucks in a ziplock bag with a large Desiccant silica gel pack. No moisture no rust.
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post #30 of 31 Old 06-14-2014, 04:28 PM
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I put my chucks in a ziplock bag with a large Desiccant silica gel pack. No moisture no rust.
I was going to recommend a cabinet with a thermostat & light socket & bulb to keep a small amount of heat to keep moisture at bay. You could also keep finishes & glues etc in there.
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post #31 of 31 Old 06-14-2014, 04:55 PM
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The manufacturers' recommendations for machined cast iron is to coat the surfaces with wax. I use Carnuba wax, as in car paste wax, and find that it does an excellent job.

As for chucks...Axminster makes a stainless steel line. Lee Valley carries them.

Last edited by Cliff. Johnston; 06-14-2014 at 04:57 PM. Reason: additional information
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