Cambridge pen from Berea - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 16 Old 05-30-2011, 05:24 PM Thread Starter
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Cambridge pen from Berea

Anyone turn this type of pen before? It's a large pen that requires a 33/64 drill bit and I'm wondering if it's worth the trouble.

http://www.bereahardwoods.com/pen-ki..._Tit_Gold.html
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post #2 of 16 Old 05-30-2011, 06:43 PM
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I've not turned that one but I've turned some similar. PSI offers starter packages for a lot of their kits (not sure if Brea or Craftsupply do) where you get several kits, the bushings and drill bits required for a discounted price. This is a good way to try a new kit and save a little money.

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #3 of 16 Old 05-30-2011, 07:29 PM Thread Starter
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Hey Sawdust, I was wondering about how large the pen is since you have a 33/64 drill bit. Seams like it has to be a pretty thick pen.
I was looking for a high end pen kit for a jewelry store but those pens seem to large and allot of trouble after reading the instructions. The big thing is the concern about splitting the blank because of the drill bit size.

I know about the sampler and starter packs and I use them from PSI They are a good deal like you said.
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post #4 of 16 Old 05-30-2011, 11:50 PM
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rr, I think the kit I linked uses a 27/64 bit. If you're concerned about splitting, cut your own blank and make it 1 inch square.and of course, drill slowly.

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #5 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 12:51 AM Thread Starter
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I'm not worried about my skills just the extra cost and work vs selling price.
I was concerned more about how big the pen was considering the hole size. After reading the below paragraph in the instructions I wondered more about if it was worth the extra cost. This is a $30 pen kit, extra trouble according to the instructions and wasn't sure if that large of a pen would be good for selling vs some of the other designs. The selling price would also be higher for the pen and might out price it.

I might still get one and see.

Needed: Mandrel-B
Bushing-16B
Drills- 31/64”, 33/64”
Wood Size- ¾” x ¾”


Preparing the Material Blanks

This is a very large diameter pen. Extreme care must be taken when drilling the blanks. Because the bits are very large there is a high probability that the blank will split if the bit is allowed to exit the material.
For that reason we recommend that the blank length should be the length of the tube plus ¾”. This will allow you to drill the hole in the blank without piercing through the bottom of the blank with the drill bit thus preventing the blowout or splitting of the blank. Some pen makers will drill both blanks with the 31/64” bit and then enlarge the hole in the short blank with the 33/64” bit.

Last edited by rrbrown; 05-31-2011 at 12:55 AM.
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post #6 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 01:50 AM
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One other tip I've read (but not yet tried) is to cut the blank long, drill slightly longer than the tube and then cut the closed end off exposing the hole. Care would obviously have to be taken to not cut too short but otherwise this seems like a good way to do those larger kits.

Didn't mean to question your skills, just forget who's done what before in here sometimes

That bowl was perfect right up until that last cut...
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post #7 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 02:01 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sawdustfactory View Post

Didn't mean to question your skills, just forget who's done what before in here sometimes
I didn't think you did, I got the impression that you thought I had the idea that it was to hard of a pen to do.

There are some things I just think are not worth the effort for selling because people won't pay the money. I use to make holiday lawn decorations and did extremely well with them. However people wanted me to make those puzzle deer. Those damn things had 10 pieces each and all the sides and surface had to be painted and then people wanted them way cheaper then i was willing to sell them for. My solution was don't make them to sell.

Last edited by rrbrown; 05-31-2011 at 02:04 AM.
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post #8 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 06:27 AM
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Think you have to sell that pen for more than a $100+ to make it worth your time and effort. Blank selection is just as important as plating and size on a pen like that. I would want to sell that pen for $175 to $250 range.

Getting the B mandrel and drill bits no big deal. I have already have B-mandrel and drill bits in my brad point and twist drill index. I am not sure what craft show would attract buyer of pens in that price range. At right craft show, you will probably sell every one you make.

I do not like Berea’s parabolic drill bits. Bought a 11/32 parabolic bit to make Button Click Pen with Double Center Ring several years ago. Holes did not come out round, bit wandered on several blanks. After that experience went out and bought drill bit indexes and stopped buying drill bits with kits. Year or so back bought another introductory offer and had no problem making those pens drilling with brad point bits.
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post #9 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 08:26 AM
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My 2 cents is stick with low end pens for craft shows. Slim line, designer pens, cigar pens, (PSI Products) etc are the best sellers. I have a friend that likes to give pens for gifts so she pays for the pen kit plus additional items to make the pen. I charge for the wood and minimal labor plus shipping. I have made larger and more expensive pens/ink pens and it takes more than a year to find the right customer, they look at the pen and price and most like the slimmer pens. Remember the customer will need to get a refill eventually. This is one of the questions they always ask so it is easy to say a Cross or Parker refill then I could get you one later on etc. If you want to make a high end pen for someone as a gift that’s great, but unless you live or display in the high rent district people will say that is “just beautiful” you have such talent and simply walk away. In this economy I sell slim line pen and pencil sets in a display box for $40.00 and cigar pens for $40.00 to $50.00 depending on the type of wood, and they have a hard time justifying the purchase. These are people who live in the UP of Michigan, Northern Wisconsin, and as far South a Milwaukee, WI, so there is a wide range of incomes.
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post #10 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 11:59 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildwood View Post
Think you have to sell that pen for more than a $100+ to make it worth your time and effort. Blank selection is just as important as plating and size on a pen like that. I would want to sell that pen for $175 to $250 range.

Getting the B mandrel and drill bits no big deal. I have already have B-mandrel and drill bits in my brad point and twist drill index. I am not sure what craft show would attract buyer of pens in that price range. At right craft show, you will probably sell every one you make.

I do not like Berea’s parabolic drill bits. Bought a 11/32 parabolic bit to make Button Click Pen with Double Center Ring several years ago. Holes did not come out round, bit wandered on several blanks. After that experience went out and bought drill bit indexes and stopped buying drill bits with kits. Year or so back bought another introductory offer and had no problem making those pens drilling with brad point bits.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Willing View Post
My 2 cents is stick with low end pens for craft shows. Slim line, designer pens, cigar pens, (PSI Products) etc are the best sellers. I have a friend that likes to give pens for gifts so she pays for the pen kit plus additional items to make the pen. I charge for the wood and minimal labor plus shipping. I have made larger and more expensive pens/ink pens and it takes more than a year to find the right customer, they look at the pen and price and most like the slimmer pens. Remember the customer will need to get a refill eventually. This is one of the questions they always ask so it is easy to say a Cross or Parker refill then I could get you one later on etc. If you want to make a high end pen for someone as a gift that’s great, but unless you live or display in the high rent district people will say that is “just beautiful” you have such talent and simply walk away. In this economy I sell slim line pen and pencil sets in a display box for $40.00 and cigar pens for $40.00 to $50.00 depending on the type of wood, and they have a hard time justifying the purchase. These are people who live in the UP of Michigan, Northern Wisconsin, and as far South a Milwaukee, WI, so there is a wide range of incomes.

Thanks for the info guys but In think you missed a part of my post.

I will be selling these pens in jewelry stores 2 of which or in huge office buildings with many executives. So they will spend the money. My problem is most executives have this idea that Mont Blanc pens are the best thing. i found them ugly, over priced and the $2000 pen I looked at didn't write. they are made of black resin and range from $160- $2000. As for my price I'm looking at $100 - $125 a pen and he will mark it up from there. I'm using mostly burls for blanks and I was selling some of the PSI pens for $35 at another jewelry store that people wouldn't pay for the higher priced ones.

As for craft shows I did around 28 shows a year for 10 years and I don't want any part in that again.
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post #11 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 05:25 PM
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I would want $175 to $250 or more for regular Cambridge Roller Ball and Fountain Pens.
You can get a break buying those kits in lots of 10 or 20. Even with quantity discount hard pressed to make one of those pens for less than $50 in materials and shipping charges.

Cambridge Roller Ball

http://www.bereahardwoods.com/pen-kit/sets/cambridge_rollerB_sterling_w_tit_gold.html

Cambridge Fountain

http://www.bereahardwoods.com/pen-kit/sets/cambridge_fountain_sterling_w_tit_gold.html

I do not have jewelry stores, wedding boutiques or other upscale stores wanting to pay me $175 to $250 for a single pen here in Jacksonville NC.

Your mileage may vary to me it boils down to return on investment!

Best of luck with it!
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post #12 of 16 Old 05-31-2011, 09:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrbrown View Post
Thanks for the info guys but In think you missed a part of my post.

I will be selling these pens in jewelry stores 2 of which or in huge office buildings with many executives. So they will spend the money. My problem is most executives have this idea that Mont Blanc pens are the best thing. i found them ugly, over priced and the $2000 pen I looked at didn't write. they are made of black resin and range from $160- $2000. As for my price I'm looking at $100 - $125 a pen and he will mark it up from there. I'm using mostly burls for blanks and I was selling some of the PSI pens for $35 at another jewelry store that people wouldn't pay for the higher priced ones.

As for craft shows I did around 28 shows a year for 10 years and I don't want any part in that again.
I am glad you gave us the remainder of the story. I would say go for it as long as you have the market, and don't just be satisfied with the PSI drill bits go out and buy some brad point bits. Looks like you could afford the extra cost.
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post #13 of 16 Old 06-01-2011, 06:10 AM
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I do not like Berea’s parabolic drill bits. Bought a 11/32 parabolic bit to make Button Click Pen with Double Center Ring several years ago. Holes did not come out round, bit wandered on several blanks.[/QUOTE]


Even in metal, a drill does not make a round hole. You can get it close to round with a 3 flute or higher bit, but to be round you have to bore it or ream it.

Harrison, at your service!
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post #14 of 16 Old 06-01-2011, 06:12 AM
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Also, if you mic them, you'll find the round tubes aren't round either.

Harrison, at your service!
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post #15 of 16 Old 06-01-2011, 10:37 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Willing View Post
I am glad you gave us the remainder of the story.
Sorry if I confused you but I did have the info in there just not as detailed and I think it went into the 2nd post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Willing View Post
Don't just be satisfied with the PSI drill bits go out and buy some brad point bits.

Looks like you could afford the extra cost.
Quote:
Originally Posted by H. A. S. View Post

I do not like Berea’s parabolic drill bits.
[/QUOTE]

I already have a brad point set but I'm looking for a set in metric sizes also.

Justify the cost sounds better.

Last edited by rrbrown; 06-01-2011 at 10:39 AM.
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post #16 of 16 Old 06-05-2011, 09:08 PM
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here is a sorce for brad point bits http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com.../products/727/
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