Bowl Turning Problem For a Long Time - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 13 Old 10-16-2011, 03:35 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 6
View Lodensam2004's Photo Album My Photos
Bowl Turning Problem For a Long Time

Bowl Turning Problem For a Long Time-photo246.jpg


I am having a problem with rough areas on my bowls. They always appear in opposite sides of the bowl, inside and out..what do i need to do to prevent this. I have tried to keep turning to remove marks..sanding until the tips of my fingers are well past the point of burnt... Help!
Lodensam2004 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 13 Old 10-16-2011, 04:19 PM
This Space For Rent
 
slatron25's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: TN
Posts: 819
View slatron25's Photo Album My Photos
Your are dealing with with the end grain of the piece. It happens to everyone. Try taking a few final cuts with freshly sharpened tools. If you do a search for John Lucas on this forum he has answered this before and gives quite a few fixes for it.

Tim
slatron25 is offline  
post #3 of 13 Old 10-16-2011, 04:34 PM
Senior Member
 
duncsuss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 2,609
View duncsuss's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodensam2004 View Post
I have tried to keep turning to remove marks..
What tools have you tried? (meaning: bowl gouge? small scraper? big scraper? carbide easy-tool? detail gouge?)

And how do you sharpen your tools? (meaning: with a Wolverine jig? by hand/eye? finger-nail grind? grindstone? type of wheel?)

Please visit my website, Fruit of the Lathe
duncsuss is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 13 Old 10-16-2011, 05:25 PM
Senior Member
 
firehawkmph's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Near Cleveland, Ohio
Posts: 5,022
View firehawkmph's Photo Album My Photos
For my final cuts when dealing with end grain such as you describe, I take some very light shear scrapes with a 1/2" bowl gouge, sharpened of course. You come up with extemely fine angel hair type shavings if you are doing it right. You are not removing much wood at each pass, but it will get rid of the tearout.
Mike Hawkins
firehawkmph is offline  
post #5 of 13 Old 10-16-2011, 05:26 PM
Senior Member
 
phinds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Central New York
Posts: 3,248
View phinds's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by duncsuss View Post
What tools have you tried? (meaning: bowl gouge? small scraper? big scraper? carbide easy-tool? detail gouge?)

And how do you sharpen your tools? (meaning: with a Wolverine jig? by hand/eye? finger-nail grind? grindstone? type of wheel?)
All tools have that problem w/ end grain and I think any sharpening technique will get your tools sharp if you know how to use it.

A new Easy Tool round tip bit is a good choice but all tools will do a good job if they're really sharp.

I've found that carbide steel tools are best for this because they take a better edge than high speed steel (but they only hold them for JUST past the point where you walk back from the sharpening system and turn the lathe back on)

You can never have too much pepperoni on your pizza or own too many clamps.
www.hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/
phinds is offline  
post #6 of 13 Old 10-16-2011, 07:08 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Jacksonville, NC
Posts: 517
View wildwood's Photo Album My Photos
Pretty much do same what Mike Hawkins is telling you. I either push or pulling gouge scrapping or cutting very lightly and slowly. As wood gets thinner, folks have a tendency to continue cutting aggressively and up end up tool lines

Sandpaper will not get rid of torn end grain or tool marks if pressing too hard, with high lathe speed. Heat destroys sandpaper, so slow lathe down and do not press so hard. Do not move to next higher grit until see progress.

Some will recommend change bevel angle on your gouge, and may find that helpful for type of bowls you turn. Dale provides some examples:
http://www.woodturningdesign.com/askdale/14/14.shtml

I am more about tool control regardless of bevel angle. Mostly use 55 degree bevel angle think one of my other gouges runs 60 to 62 degrees. Took me few years to come by those bevel angle so not going to switch regardless of bowl shape. Know more than few turners that live and die by 40 or 45 degree bevel angles. Bottom line fine what works for you and stay with it.
wildwood is offline  
post #7 of 13 Old 10-17-2011, 12:28 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Baxter, Tennessee
Posts: 3,257
View john lucas's Photo Album My Photos
Use a sharper tool and don't force the cut. I find raising the speed of the lathe and slowing down the feed rate of my tool helps more than anything. If you can use a tool with a cutting edge that is a sharper angle. for example my bowl gouge is about 45 to 50 degrees. I have one ground at 40 degrees and I have a spindle gouge that is ground to 35 degrees. If I have tearout and I can cut with those gouges and still rub the bevel then I use them.
sometimes you have to try other tactics. Try putting wax on the area and then making another pass or two. If that doesn't work try putting thinned lacquer over the area. Let it dry which doesn't take very long and make another pass that usually works.
If it's green wood sometimes you can stiffen the fibers by using a hair dryer. All you want to do is surface dry the area which toughens up the fibers and then they cut better.
sometimes it's just a matter of cutting in the opposite direction if you can. It will usually bring up fuzzy area in 2 more opposite corners but if your lucky those areas will be less fuzzy than the original areas.
Worse case, turn off the lathe and use a cabinet scraper before you sand. You can concentrate on just that area and clean it up. Then the sandpaper will more easily take the rest of it down.
john lucas is offline  
post #8 of 13 Old 10-18-2011, 09:14 AM
Sydney, Australia
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 196
View hughie's Photo Album My Photos
Another little trick is brush some oil on the offending area, any oil, cooking, BLO etc.

hughie
_______________________________________
hughie is offline  
post #9 of 13 Old 10-18-2011, 08:14 PM
Senior Member
 
don716's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: North Georgia (USA)
Posts: 623
View don716's Photo Album My Photos
I had this problem last week but figured it out and its now gone. It takes a drill and 80 grit sandpaper on a pad. My bowl wasn't totally dry and the streaks was just on the endgrain. Have the drill going in one direction and the lathe turning in the other direction. The lathe rpm should be on about 300-400rpm. 80 grit sanding will work it out then go through the rest of the grits. It will work.
don716 is offline  
post #10 of 13 Old 10-18-2011, 09:34 PM
Sydney, Australia
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 196
View hughie's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
[I had this problem last week but figured it out and its now gone. It takes a drill and 80 grit sandpaper on a pad.

yep thats what I find with the tough ones and especially if my patience is running low.

hughie
_______________________________________
hughie is offline  
post #11 of 13 Old 10-19-2011, 08:24 AM
sawdust manufacturer
 
txpaulie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: SE Texas
Posts: 581
View txpaulie's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
It takes a drill and 80 grit sandpaper on a pad.
This is my usual MO, also...

But be aware that you can sand unevenly this way...
Much more of an issue with thin walls.

I'm hoping that I can raise my skills enough to do it with tools!

p

...ever notice how "I'm sorry" and "I apologize" mean the same thing, unless you are at a funeral..?
txpaulie is offline  
post #12 of 13 Old 10-19-2011, 05:15 PM
Yea i got wood
 
robert421960's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Rockholds Ky
Posts: 3,016
View robert421960's Photo Album My Photos
sounds like alot of us are in that boat lol
i learned the drill/sanding trick lately and it sure helps me alot
robert421960 is offline  
post #13 of 13 Old 10-30-2011, 10:52 PM
treen
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: New Brunsick,Canada
Posts: 7
View treen's Photo Album My Photos
Stop Lathe ,apply any oil,let it soak for a couple of minuites then reverse the direction of the lathe ,use 60 grit sand paper. It cuts the raised grin in the end grain(oil doesthis) and you cut them off by reversing.
treen is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Long time Lurker mdntrdr New Member Introductions 4 03-01-2010 12:33 PM
Long set time glue ron9876 General Woodworking Discussion 6 12-22-2009 09:38 AM
Long time hobbyist, first time poster. Lislefan New Member Introductions 4 08-31-2009 11:55 AM
illinois long time woodworker mikeswoods New Member Introductions 4 05-20-2009 07:58 AM
table saw takes a long time to stop? engn555 Power Tools & Machinery 5 07-16-2008 08:12 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome