Beal buffing - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 17 Old 12-22-2013, 09:31 PM Thread Starter
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Beal buffing

I just got the system. I'm finishing a couple platters and I'm not real happy with the first one. I used GF Woodturners Finish with a bristle brush (not good), tried getting drips and other marks out with sanding and then buffed. It's not horrible but I want better. The next one I sanded back down ( for same reasons but sanded more). Reapplied finish with paper towel covered with a 'footy' sock and it's looking pretty good. I have the original penetration plus four additional coats. Should I sand at all or go straight to the beal?

This is the first one:
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post #2 of 17 Old 12-22-2013, 09:44 PM
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I am interested in the replies.

The GF Wood Turners Finish has not been working for me. Perhaps the operator, perhaps the application method.

I tried paper towel. I did not like the rough texture.

In my latest project I changed to foam brush. I was able to get a smoother coat, but not without some "rivulets".

I applied several coats, then hand sanded to get the surface to be even, removing the "rivulets" before I did the finer grits, then the full micro mesh grits and finally the Beall Tripoli followed by White Diamond.

The end result was flat, smooth and shiny, but with fine scratches I could see.

In the meantime I purchased a new container of GF Salad Bowl Finish, which has been working better for my projects. The wipe on coats level out for me better than the Wood Turners Finish.
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post #3 of 17 Old 12-22-2013, 09:52 PM Thread Starter
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It gets great reviews but that can be slanted on just how quick and easy it is. I'm thinking it's too good to be true. The platter in the picture was probably the best turning I have done and the finish basically ruined it.

When you sanded, what was the lowest grit used?

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post #4 of 17 Old 12-22-2013, 10:10 PM
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I've had good luck with Genersl wood turners finish. I apply with a cloth. The only problem is on pepper mills on the top I get swirl marks. I have stated to apply to the tops with the lathe stopped. Over all I like the finish.
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post #5 of 17 Old 12-22-2013, 10:21 PM
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I've been using GF Woodturner's Finish with great success. For the first coat, I apply it with a terrycloth rag and try to really get it soaked. This seems to help it penetrate and gets any grain raising out of the way. I use the terrycloth instead of the sponge and panty hose I use for subsequent coats because the panty hose can snag on raised grain and make a real mess. After this has dried for 1/2 hour to an hour, I sand with 320-400 just to get things smooth again. For the subsequent coats, I use a rectangular cosmetic sponge wrapped in a piece of panty hose. I tried those try on footies, but I think they're too thin or something; they just didn't work out. Depending on how much gloss I'm after and how porous the grain is, I usually do 4 - 10 coats. For the most part, I haven't had to polish it out at all.
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post #6 of 17 Old 12-22-2013, 10:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Paine View Post
I am interested in the replies.

The GF Wood Turners Finish has not been working for me. Perhaps the operator, perhaps the application method.

I tried paper towel. I did not like the rough texture.

In my latest project I changed to foam brush. I was able to get a smoother coat, but not without some "rivulets".

I applied several coats, then hand sanded to get the surface to be even, removing the "rivulets" before I did the finer grits, then the full micro mesh grits and finally the Beall Tripoli followed by White Diamond.

The end result was flat, smooth and shiny, but with fine scratches I could see.

In the meantime I purchased a new container of GF Salad Bowl Finish, which has been working better for my projects. The wipe on coats level out for me better than the Wood Turners Finish.
Dave, try using the back side of the paper towel for better results.
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post #7 of 17 Old 12-22-2013, 10:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clpead View Post
I just got the system. I'm finishing a couple platters and I'm not real happy with the first one. I used GF Woodturners Finish with a bristle brush (not good), tried getting drips and other marks out with sanding and then buffed. It's not horrible but I want better. The next one I sanded back down ( for same reasons but sanded more). Reapplied finish with paper towel covered with a 'footy' sock and it's looking pretty good. I have the original penetration plus four additional coats. Should I sand at all or go straight to the beal?

This is the first one:
Arron, I use 1500 just to knock down anything I can feel before I go to Beal.
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post #8 of 17 Old 12-22-2013, 10:57 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jomarra
Arron, I use 1500 just to knock down anything I can feel before I go to Beal.
That's what I was thinking. Wet or dry?

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post #9 of 17 Old 12-22-2013, 11:13 PM
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I've only used "the Beall system" exactly as per the video made by Mr Beall -- several applications of Danish Oil, then buff with tripoli, white diamond and carnauba wax. I've been very happy with how it worked out on the half dozen bowls I've processed this way.

Tomorrow I might venture into new territory -- I have a piece that I finished with MinWax water-based polyacrylic, the surface isn't as smooth as I'd like & I'm hoping it will improve if I buff it.

GF Woodturners Finish is something I've only used on pens; in my experience, it's kind of like the Mylands high-build finish -- kinda shellacky, gets sticky if there's too much around, and requires some pressure & heat to make it set into a glaze.

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post #10 of 17 Old 12-22-2013, 11:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clpead View Post
That's what I was thinking. Wet or dry?
Dry.
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post #11 of 17 Old 12-23-2013, 04:03 AM
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The Beal sysytem (or any buffing system) will only take out the smallest deformities in the finish. The finish needs to be smooth before you start. If you see any lumbs bumbs or thick brush marks it's just going to polish those, they will still be there. I sand the finish with 600 grit until it's flat and then apply another light coat with a cloth. If that still has streaks I'll sand it flat and then go on up the grits to 1500 grit before I use the Beal.
Same is true if you have pourous woods, you must fill the grain first with either finish or a filler and then apply finish and sand until it's perfectly flat. Then use the Beal.
I like to use the Beal with a thin oil finish or a thinned lacquer. That way it's very smooth from the start and takes very little effort to finish. however this is not a thick finish and may not hold to a lot of abuse.
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post #12 of 17 Old 12-23-2013, 08:16 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john lucas View Post
The Beal sysytem (or any buffing system) will only take out the smallest deformities in the finish. The finish needs to be smooth before you start. If you see any lumbs bumbs or thick brush marks it's just going to polish those, they will still be there. I sand the finish with 600 grit until it's flat and then apply another light coat with a cloth. If that still has streaks I'll sand it flat and then go on up the grits to 1500 grit before I use the Beal.
Same is true if you have pourous woods, you must fill the grain first with either finish or a filler and then apply finish and sand until it's perfectly flat. Then use the Beal.
I like to use the Beal with a thin oil finish or a thinned lacquer. That way it's very smooth from the start and takes very little effort to finish. however this is not a thick finish and may not hold to a lot of abuse.
Thanks John. I think I would much prefer using danish oil and then buffing. I got started late on two presents and needed quick results.

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post #13 of 17 Old 12-23-2013, 08:24 AM
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Been there done that :)
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post #14 of 17 Old 12-23-2013, 09:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by john lucas View Post
... sand it flat and then go on up the grits to 1500 grit before I use the Beal. ...
Thanks John - this has saved me trying to buff a piece that isn't flat to begin with.

I'm not sure I have any regular sandpaper over 600 grit, and I don't want to get black residue from the wet-or-dry into the finish, so I'll have to spend longer at it.

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post #15 of 17 Old 12-23-2013, 09:41 AM
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I had trouble with the black residue from Automotive wet or dry and also from trying to use steel wool. I purchased this Norton sandpaper from thesandingglove.com. http://thesandingglove.com/Norton-A2...ive-Sheets.asp
It is great stuff. If you wipe it on your jeans it will clean it to the point you can use it longer than the automotive and it doesn't leave any color to the wood.
I haven't tried wet sanding with it. I use the automotive papers to wet sand finishes. A good finish won't pick up the residue since you wipe it off after wet sanding.
For really fine finishes I don't use the Beal. I level the finish surface and then go up to 1500 grit wet or dry. Then I use automotive polishes to bring it up to a really deep gloss.
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post #16 of 17 Old 12-23-2013, 12:34 PM
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Thanks for these tips, John. I'll have to check out The Sanding Glove stuff.


Quote:
Originally Posted by john lucas View Post
I had trouble with the black residue from Automotive wet or dry and also from trying to use steel wool. I purchased this Norton sandpaper from thesandingglove.com. http://thesandingglove.com/Norton-A2...ive-Sheets.asp
It is great stuff. If you wipe it on your jeans it will clean it to the point you can use it longer than the automotive and it doesn't leave any color to the wood.
I haven't tried wet sanding with it. I use the automotive papers to wet sand finishes. A good finish won't pick up the residue since you wipe it off after wet sanding.
For really fine finishes I don't use the Beal. I level the finish surface and then go up to 1500 grit wet or dry. Then I use automotive polishes to bring it up to a really deep gloss.

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post #17 of 17 Old 12-23-2013, 05:06 PM Thread Starter
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Here is the second platter. It is a much better finish than the first.
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