Advice needed on sharpening jigs - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 20 Old 08-12-2007, 07:35 AM Thread Starter
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Advice needed on sharpening jigs

Hi All,

This is my first post and I look forward to many more. I have just got my lathe (not even set it up yet) and am very much a beginner, so sorry in advance for the stupid questions I'm bound to ask. (hope this isn't one of them).

I need advice about which sharpening jig to get. I am thinking of either the Sorby or the Heligrind. Any advice appreciated.

Just seen the Tormek range too, but not sure which one would be best.

Last edited by cherryferret; 08-12-2007 at 07:46 AM.
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post #2 of 20 Old 08-12-2007, 08:04 AM
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Sorry I cannot give any advice on what jig to use, I have no first hand experience with any of them (I have sharpened 100's of lathe tools, just never used one of the jigs). Someone should come along soon and help. I just wanted to jump in and welcome you, you will enjoy the new lathe I am sure. There are some turners here, and no question is a stupid one, asking for advice is smarter than learning the hard way .
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post #3 of 20 Old 08-12-2007, 12:10 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry I cannot give any advice on what jig to use, I have no first hand experience with any of them (I have sharpened 100's of lathe tools, just never used one of the jigs). Someone should come along soon and help. I just wanted to jump in and welcome you, you will enjoy the new lathe I am sure. There are some turners here, and no question is a stupid one, asking for advice is smarter than learning the hard way .
Thanks for the welcome Daren. Hand sharpening may come later but at the minute I'd like to keep my tools a decent length instead of the stub's I'd end up with if I tried it now .
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post #4 of 20 Old 08-12-2007, 02:06 PM
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Cherryferett
Welcome to the forum. Like Daren said, no question is stupid, except the one you don't ask. Always good to see new turners.
As far as which jig is the best for sharpening your chisels etc, it's a matter of choice or preference, but some advice from an older turner always eases your decision which to use. Here are my thoughts on the various grinding systems you mentioned. The Tormek is a great system but expensive, I used mine for years. Does a good job but is slow. The Sorby is supposed to be good but I never used one. The Wolverine grinder and the Verigrind jig is a great way to sharpen your tools and the cost is reasonable. If money is a problem for you there is a turner named Darrell Feltmate that has a website where he explains how to make your own and it is simple to do. I already bought my wolverine before I saw his site explaining how to make your own jigs.Even if you don't want to make your own his site is teriffic for learning all kinds of things about turning, if your a new turner or old.
Once again, welcome, and we look forward to eventually seeing you post pictures of your turnings. If your interested, check out my turnings under Mitch Gallery. Good luck and keep them turning. Mitch
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post #5 of 20 Old 08-15-2007, 06:08 PM
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Cherryferett,

I have been spoiled by the Wolverine system. It is easy to learn and quick to master. I can hit he same anle and pitch every time. As Mitch said, there is a "Home Brew" that is available. Give them both a look.

Butch
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post #6 of 20 Old 08-16-2007, 06:49 PM
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Cool Advice needed on sharpening jigs.

Hi,I have been using the Sorby deluxe jig for some 12 months now.And to be honest once set up properly it is a joy to use , and is as quick as sharpening free hand. Also Sorby have recently added some natty little extras to aid sharpening skews,standard gouges and chisels.I certainly wont use anything else now.

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post #7 of 20 Old 08-18-2007, 06:56 AM Thread Starter
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Hi,I have been using the Sorby deluxe jig for some 12 months now.And to be honest once set up properly it is a joy to use , and is as quick as sharpening free hand. Also Sorby have recently added some natty little extras to aid sharpening skews,standard gouges and chisels.I certainly wont use anything else now.
Thanks for that. I have bought the Sorby deluxe and it's nice to get confirmation that it is a good system.
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post #8 of 20 Old 08-18-2007, 07:07 PM
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I have also purchased the Robert Sorby Model 447 Deluxe Universal Sharpening System. Just a couple of days ago. Haven't used it yet. Would like to find a source to purchase the table and jigs that bolt on the top. Any help in locating a source?
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post #9 of 20 Old 08-19-2007, 06:02 AM
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Smile Sorby sharpening jig.

Hi Red hawk, not sure where you might get the accessories from on your side of the pond, you might try Craft Supplies U.S.A. On this side I have used Turners Retreat, Craft Supplies U.K. and Stiles and Bates . All these sites have been very helpful and their mail order is really quick. Failing all that you might try Google or Ask.
If you have any problems setting the jig up let me Know as I hadn't set mine up quite right, and it wasn't until I had a chat with a chap from Sorby that I realised it needed a little adjustment. So I would advise you pay close attention to the measurements as regards to measuring from the centre line of your grinder. Also it helps if your grinder has one white wheel of 40mm(1 9/16" approx).Hope all this info is of use. If you have time let me know how you get on, Stevie.

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post #10 of 20 Old 08-19-2007, 08:53 AM
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Stevie, Do you use a table and jigs with yours? What problems did you have setting it up? I an going to build a sharpening workstation with the 2 Sorby Sharpening Systems (a Model 446 and a Model 447) mounted centered to the wheels of an 8" slow speed grinder. One wheel is fine and the other medium grit). They are the Norton Aluminum Oxide White Wheels. I found the 2 Sorby Sharpeing Systems on Closeout for $25 each at my local Woodworking store. The wheels were about $18 each. I may just make the little tables out of plexiglass or starboard, etc and mount them. The jigs could be attached to the small table with adhesive. Any ideas before I continue?
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post #11 of 20 Old 08-19-2007, 02:29 PM
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Post Sorby sharpening jig.

Hi Redhawk, oh where to start. Well the way I went was to build a portable station as I am pushed for space. The base is made out of 3/4" Birch ply, wrapped with a 1&1/4"x5/8" batton, mitred at the corners, and glued /pinned in place. My grinder is a Record Power 6"bench grinder.I fastened this to two squares of 3/4" ply to raise it to the height I wanted. My sorby jig is fastened in front of the white wheel.Advice needed on sharpening jigs-grinder.jpg This is also raised by 3/4" to suit the height requirements for the gouge grinding jig.Advice needed on sharpening jigs-sorby-jig.jpgThe critical measurements that come with Instructions are to be adhered to, this is mainly for the gouge jig ,as you will want to keep the grinding profile the same as that that came from the factory, (The grinding bevel should be around 35 Degrees).Advice needed on sharpening jigs-sorby-jig-3-.jpg

The home made jig you can see on the other side is a copy of the one described in Keith Rowleys book Woodturning A Foundation Course. This book in my opinion is a must for beginners.
I hope the photo's along with my reply is helpful,I would love to Know how you get on. If you want any more info let me know.
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post #12 of 20 Old 08-20-2007, 08:41 AM
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Stevie, very much the same setup I am contemplating. The pics really help a lot! Now I just gotta find a source for the table and jigs. Which of the Sorby jigs did you get. Is that a have to have?
Thanks,
Wayne
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post #13 of 20 Old 08-20-2007, 11:58 AM
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Talking Sorby sharpening jig.

Hi there ,just got home from work. Glad the info so far has been helpful, and yes you need the jig table which has a groove in it to accept the skew and gouge jigs.Sorry I can't stop to chat but I got some chores to do before I start my next project on the Lathe.Speak to you later,regards Stevie.

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post #14 of 20 Old 09-10-2007, 04:18 PM
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Tool sharpening

Hi all have a look at WWW.JOOLTOOL.COM is this for real, or are we looking at a gaget!!!!!
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post #15 of 20 Old 09-10-2007, 04:26 PM
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It is a freehand machine, Foley Belsaw has been selling them for awhile. They work, but you need a steady hand and a good eye, seems to scare most off from sharpening. They think they need fancy jigs and what not.
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post #16 of 20 Old 10-05-2007, 12:43 PM
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Hi Mitch

Do you have the website for Darrel Feltmate handy?

I would like to have a look at what he has.

Thanks

Gerry
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post #17 of 20 Old 10-05-2007, 12:50 PM
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Hi Mitch

Do you have the website for Darrel Feltmate handy?

I would like to have a look at what he has.

Thanks

Gerry

http://www.aroundthewoods.com/
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post #18 of 20 Old 10-05-2007, 04:01 PM
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One of our club members brought the Jooltool in for us to play with. It might not be bad for some carving tools but it sucked for turning tools. It was really hard to use. We had trouble producing an kind of flat bevel.
My preference is the Oneway sharpening system although in practical use it isn't really much different than the Sorby. I had a homebuilt system similar to the Oneway before I broke down and bought the system.
I sharpened by hand for years but now using the Oneway and a set of homemade jigs to set the Oneway at the jig the right distance from the stone, I remove almost no metal at all when sharpening.
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post #19 of 20 Old 10-05-2007, 07:06 PM
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I have to chime in with Mitch regarding the Tormek. It does a great job but is expensive and slow.

Because it is a slow, water cooled system, it is ideal for sharpening shears, kitchen knives and carbon steel tools.

Todays tools, the High Speed Steel (HSS) variety, can take the faster wheels without loosing their temper. (This bit of wisdom was imparted to me by an old timer, can someone verify?)

Since my tools are all some 40 odd years old and my wife, bless her heart, spends a lot of time in the kitchen, the Tormek seemed the right decision at the time.
Now I'm not so sure it wouldn't have been cheaper just to replace the tools
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post #20 of 20 Old 10-06-2007, 10:52 AM
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You can't heat up a High speed tool hot enough to destroy the temper with a grinder. I've talked to several tool makers and also looked up the heat treating instructions for HSS.
The reason I don't like the wet wheel grinders is two fold. One is that I sharpen some tools without a jig and I learned to control the angle and degree of cut by watching the sparkes come over the edge. There aren't any on wet wheel grinders. The other reason is the wear on the wheels. They wear quickly when used to sharpen turning tools and the wheels are expensive to replace.
I like a slow speed grinder simply because it's running slower, this heats the tool less and isn't nearly as dangerous. I don't worry about overheating the tool but I often go from the grinder right back to work and if the tool is hot it's easy to burn your fingers. Of course with a jig and a light touch you remove so little metal the tool doesn't really get hot.
I like the white or blue wheels. I haven't used one of the pink ones yet. The white and blue wheels run cooler and cut faster and cleaner than the standard gray wheels that come with many grinders.
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