What's the correct method to join these? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 35 Old 03-09-2020, 09:28 AM
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Originally Posted by epicfail48 View Post
Pocket screws are fasteners, not a joinery method, no matter what Kreg claims
I totally agree with this although I did watch a video by Kings Finewoodworking where he drove a car over a box put together with pocket screws.

In a workbench you need solid joinery to resist racking stresses. (Unless its fastened to a wall maybe). IMO nothing could beat a pinned mortise and tenon for this project. If you're not ready to dive into that, dowels or floating tenons would be a logical next choice.

Pocket screws could be used as a substitute for clamps. Another advantage is no wait dime for glue to dry.

If you go this route, use the long 2 1/2" screws.

Robert
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post #22 of 35 Old 03-09-2020, 05:26 PM
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I totally agree with this although I did watch a video by Kings Finewoodworking where he drove a car over a box put together with pocket screws.
Worth mentioning here that you can also drive a car over a glass soda bottle

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post #23 of 35 Old 03-10-2020, 11:42 AM Thread Starter
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Your build is incredible. I am very impressed. Are you certain you are a newbie? I jest; I have no reason to doubt you.

I had had a person suggest using half laps as joinery. I am working on a new build in Sketchup to incorporate half laps. The biggest obstacle is learning how to use Sketchup, especially when I must add a half lap to a board. Despite the challenge, I am having nearly as much fun designing as I am building!

If you are still willing to share your most update plans, I will be most grateful. Thank you very much for your kindness.
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post #24 of 35 Old 03-10-2020, 12:25 PM
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I like the advice given in post #20, gives you a good solid base which you often need when using a workbench. There are other similar ideas where the legs are built with 2 boards half the thickness of the leg that also gives a solid base.
Lots of ideas here:
http://absolutelyfreeplans.com/workbenches.html

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post #25 of 35 Old 03-11-2020, 09:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Hoshijiro View Post
Your build is incredible. I am very impressed. Are you certain you are a newbie? I jest; I have no reason to doubt you.

I had had a person suggest using half laps as joinery. I am working on a new build in Sketchup to incorporate half laps. The biggest obstacle is learning how to use Sketchup, especially when I must add a half lap to a board. Despite the challenge, I am having nearly as much fun designing as I am building!

If you are still willing to share your most update plans, I will be most grateful. Thank you very much for your kindness.
If you meant mine, thank you for the compliment! I've uploaded latest plans at the plan thread here just in case. Same color = identical pieces ( none of that left/right or front/back for this build ). Some notes/tips:

- Where I live (Greece), the closest dimentions I could easily find were 90mmx90mm for legs and 45mmx95mm for all else. Those are the dimensions used, but do consider them as 4x4 and 2x4 respectively.
- Start with the corner legs, using the 2x4s for measuring instead of a ruler. That allows you to undercut, test fit and make sure the fit is snug (mine were quite loose and I am now gluing scrap to make the fit snug)
- When working on the 2x4s, do the miter cut first, and use the scrap to mark all of them. Will make it easier and that way you're sure everything is the same length (I did it after, which is more work and made some boards a bit shorter)

I'll probably be making a second bench, and will be trying those as well :)

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post #26 of 35 Old 03-12-2020, 07:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Hoshijiro View Post
Hello,

Would you please tell me what is the best method, particularly for a beginner, to assemble the frame shown in the picture? I am considering the use of pocket holes to join the 2x4s and 4x4s. However, I am concerned that this method may not be appropriate. An example of why: The center joint (looks like an "X", where one 2x4 is met with 2 other 2x4s that are opposite of each other, appears that pocket hole screws will interfere with each other. The interference could prevent proper usage of the screws, or it may weaken the integrity of the joint. The other joints may suffer issues with pocket holes due to the angles. Am I correct? I have also considered cross-lap joints at the "X", but I fear my skill set is insufficient. I greatly look forward to your recommendations. Thank you for your time.
Note: I have used the free version of Sketchup to create the frame. I also included the file predicting its usefulness for some.

OK, you said you are a Beginner... I could not see the sketchup picture...
I don't know if you are after a Miter (45 degree) or not...

If you want GOOD solid corner joint, I would suggest a simple Half-Lap joint...
Which means... cut 1/2 of the thickness away from each Corner board... Bottom half of your TOP board... and Top 1/2 from the bottom board. Now put them together so the lip of one board goes into the cutaway of the other; aka Half-Lap joint... When you glue thee together, it is AWFULLY VERY STRONG... and Super Easy to make!

Have fun... Let us know what you end up doing, OK?
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post #27 of 35 Old 03-12-2020, 11:14 PM
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I wouldn’t hesitate to use pocket screws for this project. That’s what I’d use, in fact. Just use a good glue as well. Where screws might collide, offset the pocket holes a bit so there’s no chance of collision. If you’re nervous about any of the joints, get braces or “repair plates” to supplement the pocket screws.

It’s easy to get wrapped up in over-engineering a project. The failure points are often something you haven’t even considered yet. I wouldn’t sweat it too much. If a wobble develops, add a brace. No big deal.
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post #28 of 35 Old 03-13-2020, 01:02 AM
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Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
If you go with dowels pick up some of these, they make life a lot easier

https://www.rockler.com/dowel-center...izes?sid=AF078
I'm with Frank C on this, I've some of these for years and they sure are simple (easy to use), inexpensive, and make aligning the dowels easy... There are plenty of places that sell 'em
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post #29 of 35 Old 03-13-2020, 02:09 AM
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Originally Posted by wayneh View Post
I wouldn’t hesitate to use pocket screws for this project. That’s what I’d use, in fact. Just use a good glue as well. Where screws might collide, offset the pocket holes a bit so there’s no chance of collision. If you’re nervous about any of the joints, get braces or “repair plates” to supplement the pocket screws.

It’s easy to get wrapped up in over-engineering a project. The failure points are often something you haven’t even considered yet. I wouldn’t sweat it too much. If a wobble develops, add a brace. No big deal.
Why waste the time building something you know will fail? If you anticipate adding a brace in the future, why not take the time now to do things properly? After all, if you dont have time to do things right, when will you have time to do it over?

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post #30 of 35 Old 03-13-2020, 11:56 AM
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I like the suggestion of using double 2x4s for the legs, with the outer one shortened to allow the apron to sit on it, just like a header over a window opening in a wall. Another idea from basic carpentry is to use joist hangers on the cross pieces. It may not be "pure" joinery, but it will be very strong and easy to do with minimal tools. A workbench is mainly a utility item, and the cross pieces are not visible unless you lie on the floor and look up, so make it simple and strong and move on to other projects.
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post #31 of 35 Old 03-14-2020, 01:15 PM
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There are stronger and easier ways to go, snagged these from the internet.







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post #32 of 35 Old 03-15-2020, 10:38 AM
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I also suggest using dowels. Making something for yourself is an excellent time and place to make a few mistakes while learning a new method for anything. By the time you're done you'll have drilled dozens of holes and will have your method nailed, so when it comes time to making something for someone else you'll have the experience and confidence to jump right in.

Please keep us posted!
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post #33 of 35 Old 03-18-2020, 07:32 AM Thread Starter
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The project has provided much inspiration. Thank you for sharing!
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post #34 of 35 Old 03-18-2020, 08:10 AM Thread Starter
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You are most correct: confidence comes with experience; experience comes with courage. I have attempted multiple joinery methods, such as dowels, castle joints, half and cross laps and mortise and tenon. My initial attempts were flawed; however, the errors were most educational. I plan on using these methods in the assembly of my workbench, and I will do my best!
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post #35 of 35 Old 03-18-2020, 08:15 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you for the images. The joinery used is similar to my redesign. This elicits confidence that my redesign will be more resilient than my initial design.
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