What sort of glue is used to join these wood pieces? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 01-18-2019, 08:37 PM Thread Starter
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What sort of glue is used to join these wood pieces?

See the attached image: https://ibb.co/0QZxRXm
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post #2 of 14 Old 01-18-2019, 08:50 PM
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Could be mast any glue. Iíd bet those are finger joints and in a production environment, it could be epoxy, RF cured glue, or some sort d contact adhesive. Why the question? Did you buy this bed and itís coming apart. The picture looks like the bed rails and head/foot boards are glue ups of short/narrow pieces.
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post #3 of 14 Old 01-18-2019, 08:59 PM
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Wood glue is used. They try to use every scrap of wood so they finger joint the ends of the wood and glue them together to make long lengths. Personally I think it's substandard construction. You see this done a lot on door jambs and I see a lot of the door jambs coming apart because of the finger joints.
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post #4 of 14 Old 01-18-2019, 10:32 PM
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Yeah, I'd guess finger joints also, but couldn't tell from the image. As an aside, a neighbor's home was framed last year with finger jointed two by lumber. Every stud and door header was made up of 1 to 2 foot long pieces of pine. Even the doubled and tripeled gluelam beam supports were finger jointed lumber. Think the drywall will keep things together over the decades?
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post #5 of 14 Old 01-19-2019, 05:19 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Frye View Post
Could be mast any glue. Iíd bet those are finger joints and in a production environment, it could be epoxy, RF cured glue, or some sort d contact adhesive. Why the question? Did you buy this bed and itís coming apart. The picture looks like the bed rails and head/foot boards are glue ups of short/narrow pieces.

I was hoping it was PVC as I'm allergic to Formaldehyde
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post #6 of 14 Old 01-19-2019, 05:21 AM Thread Starter
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post #7 of 14 Old 01-19-2019, 05:22 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
Wood glue is used. They try to use every scrap of wood so they finger joint the ends of the wood and glue them together to make long lengths. Personally I think it's substandard construction. You see this done a lot on door jambs and I see a lot of the door jambs coming apart because of the finger joints.

I guess it's not very strong then, especially for something like a bed frame, which is a bit of a worry if you have people jumping on your bed.



Would you purchase something like this...?
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post #8 of 14 Old 01-19-2019, 06:49 AM
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I would not be concerned because of strength because if done correctly, finger joints are a good joint.



I would be concerned because he bed was made by a company counting pennies so much that they used finger jointed material on a product that was finished with the joint visible. I would be concerned that the company skimped on cost in other areas of construction that I cannot see.



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post #9 of 14 Old 01-19-2019, 07:01 AM
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In the UK virtually all lengths of wood are made this way. Videos on utube,
I have never had any problems.
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post #10 of 14 Old 01-19-2019, 08:09 AM
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Quote:
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I guess it's not very strong then, especially for something like a bed frame, which is a bit of a worry if you have people jumping on your bed.



Would you purchase something like this...?
It's one of these things that is fine when it is new but is something you can't expect to last for decades. Wood expands and contracts with the weather and over time the push and pull on the finger joint takes it's toll.

When I buy something I tend to keep it forever so I wouldn't purchase a bed that had finger joint construction.
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post #11 of 14 Old 01-19-2019, 08:23 AM
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When my house was renovated a while back, fingerjoint moulding was used on the baseboard. It was delivered, wrapped in plastic on a rainy day. By the next morning, it was lots of little pieces of moulding. Virtually every joint had come apart.
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post #12 of 14 Old 01-19-2019, 09:07 AM Thread Starter
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I know from experience that raw wood definitely bends and warps when in contact with moisture.

I am actually wanting to purchase the single version of same bed frame but from the picture here, it doesn't appear to have any finger joints: https://ibb.co/Z8YRmH5

I guess I'll just have to open it and check when I get home, as they only had the queen bed on display at the store.


I also just received an email from a company that builds wood products. I sent them the same picture and this is their reply:


"The images of the bed are not clear enough to see detail but in the image that shows the end timber on the base, the timber appears to be laminated. If it is, we suspect that it may be constructed with glue using Formaldehyde as we understand that this is commonly used in the process of heat pressing and laminating timber.

However, we do not know where IKEA sources itís timber from, how it is manufactured nor what their standards are so it is best if you can check with IKEA.

We mainly work with recycled timber that is solid so our experience with composite timbers is limited.

We hope this may be of some help to you".


Does it sound truthful, as I would imagine wood glue, would be a cheaper option than Urea Formaldehyde, given the likelihood of skimping cost.
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post #13 of 14 Old 01-19-2019, 11:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quickstep View Post
When my house was renovated a while back, fingerjoint moulding was used on the baseboard. It was delivered, wrapped in plastic on a rainy day. By the next morning, it was lots of little pieces of moulding. Virtually every joint had come apart.

I would not use that experience to condemn ALL finger jointed wood. Wood delivered on a rainy day, wrapped in plastic is not the best way to get any wood. There are many reasons why that particular lot of wood could have come apart.


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post #14 of 14 Old 01-20-2019, 09:00 AM Thread Starter
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Turns out the single version had pieces of wood glued/laminated in a different style: https://ibb.co/kBZMK9w

I think I'm going to return this one to the store and search for another bed.

Cheers all
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