What joint is this? (Shelf to support) - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 14 Old 01-13-2020, 04:15 PM Thread Starter
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What joint is this? (Shelf to support)

I made this shelf a few years ago and would like to write about it. But I canít seem to pinpoint the name of this joint.

Maybe cobbed half lap, or some variation of a bridle (different grain orientation)?




The supports have a dado on 3 sides.



The shelves have a simple notch.

Any advice or ideas would be greatly appreciated!
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post #2 of 14 Old 01-13-2020, 04:34 PM
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Can't answer your question. By my understanding, typical interlocking shelves are bad design, because they can lack support at the front and back of the shelves. In your case that may still exist, but may be lessened by the inset dados in the support. How has it held up for you?

Geoff
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post #3 of 14 Old 01-13-2020, 04:38 PM Thread Starter
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What joint is this? (Shelf to support)

It has held up perfect for the past few years.

I think the trick is the inset dadoes as you mentioned and that the fit is tight enough. Without weight on the shelves you can wiggle them out. With weight, they donít budge.

Weight on the front of the shelves causes the back to want to raise, which canít happen.

*Also, the rails need to go pretty far forward into the shelves. In my case itís about halfway, so weight on the front makes it like a teeter totter with the back end clamped down.

Last edited by keith204; 01-13-2020 at 04:40 PM.
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post #4 of 14 Old 01-13-2020, 06:33 PM
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I did some work on an old motel and when we removed the bed,
the frame was interlocking boards just like those in the vertical position
and the joints look almost identical.
so that profile may not be limited to just shelves.

.

.
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post #5 of 14 Old 01-14-2020, 11:46 AM
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Could it be called a bridle joint?

Its' never hot or cold in New Hampshire... its' always seasonal.
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post #6 of 14 Old 01-14-2020, 11:50 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BernieL View Post
Could it be called a bridle joint?


Thatís what it looks like to me but with a different grain orientation on the shelf.

The people (or whatever) of Reddit think itís a ďhoused half lapĒ but when I google that I donít see anything similar.
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post #7 of 14 Old 01-14-2020, 01:14 PM
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post #8 of 14 Old 01-14-2020, 01:15 PM
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If the boards crossed like that when they are horizontal, it would be a lap joint, so I dunno.

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post #9 of 14 Old 01-14-2020, 06:17 PM
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According to this they fall under the half lap category:

http://sawdustmaking.com/woodjoints/halflap.htm

Looking at your post again I see the dados on the supports, that is an interesting twist.

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post #10 of 14 Old 01-14-2020, 07:41 PM
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A lap joint is when the two pieces completely cross eachother, such as in a cross. A half lap is when the 2 pieces are joined at an end such as a picture frame corner or a cabinet face frame corner.
The same exact principle, just a hatter of where the junction takes place.

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post #11 of 14 Old 01-14-2020, 08:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
According to this they fall under the half lap category:

http://sawdustmaking.com/woodjoints/halflap.htm

Looking at your post again I see the dados on the supports, that is an interesting twist.
The diagrams on the sawdustmaking website looked familiar, and they did cite the source too. Sure enough, they came from a very good woodworking book that is in the public domain:

Woodwork Joints: How They Are Set Out, How Made and Where Used, by William Fairham.

I found it I was looking for woodworking books on the Gutenberg Project. It would not seem out of place today. We still use the same woodworking joinery. Here is a link to the book:
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/21531

The Gutenberg Project is a website with many books and other writings, all of them in the public domain, free for anyone to read, download, reprint, and use. Here is a search for free woodworking books on Project Gutenberg. See if you find anything you like:
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/sea...ry=woodworking
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post #12 of 14 Old 01-15-2020, 01:43 AM
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By definition, a bridle joint has lap joint features along with mortise features. I'm not a professional woodworker as I have never nor will I ever sell any of my work, so take my humble opinion as that of a serious amature. I was a self taught hacker until my retirement in 2009 - I now consider myself to be a self taught craftsman!

Its' never hot or cold in New Hampshire... its' always seasonal.
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post #13 of 14 Old 01-15-2020, 01:42 PM
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Bridal Joints:
http://sawdustmaking.com/woodjoints/bridal.htm

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #14 of 14 Old 01-15-2020, 05:25 PM
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Frank has made two different suggestions, based on diagrams from the same book, the one I recommended above. I will recommend it again. Here is an excellent FREE book about woodworking joints:

Woodwork Joints: How They Are Set Out, How Made and Where Used, by William Fairham.
https://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/21531
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