Time to upgrade router!? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 17 Old 03-21-2012, 09:51 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Central NY
Posts: 61
View newman11's Photo Album My Photos
Time to upgrade router!?

I have an old Craftsman hand-me-down router. It has to be at least 10-12 years old. Works great. Trouble is the router has a 1/4" collet. I was gifted the Porter Cable 4210 (basic) dovetail jig. The jig comes with the 1/2 set and 1/2 guide. However, my router is set up only for 1/4".

Are all routers able to somehow switch to the 1/2" collett or is it time to invest?
newman11 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 Old 03-21-2012, 11:53 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 298
View mveach's Photo Album My Photos
many of the old routers were only 1/4" . Now as far as to which router to buy, this has already bin beat to death. most of your major brands make good routers though there are a few that are more popular than others.

LIB MR DUCKS
mveach is offline  
post #3 of 17 Old 03-22-2012, 12:02 AM
John
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: La Crosse, Kansas
Posts: 3,028
View jschaben's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by newman11 View Post
I have an old Craftsman hand-me-down router. It has to be at least 10-12 years old. Works great. Trouble is the router has a 1/4" collet. I was gifted the Porter Cable 4210 (basic) dovetail jig. The jig comes with the 1/2 set and 1/2 guide. However, my router is set up only for 1/4".

Are all routers able to somehow switch to the 1/2" collett or is it time to invest?
Hi - you would just need to get the proper bits in a 1/4" shank configuration. Not a big issue as MLCS and many other suppliers carry such things in stock. I have an old craftsman router I just dedicated to dovetailing as the depth of cut was such a PIA that once I finally got it right, I didn't want to change it. That may be a reason to upgrade if your's is one of THOSE. The older Craftsman have more than enough power to cut dovetails.

John

If I strive for perfection, I can generally achieve good'nuff, If I strive for good'nuff, I generally achieve firewood
jschaben is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 17 Old 03-22-2012, 12:11 AM
Senior Member
 
bob sacamano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: la mirada ca
Posts: 566
View bob sacamano's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by newman11 View Post

Are all routers able to somehow switch to the 1/2" collett or is it time to invest?
i just got woodcrafts sales flyer in the mail today. turn in any old router and get $50 instant credit towards a porter cable router.

1/2 bits are better and safer than 1/4.

its time to invest in a new router.

build it right or not at all
bob sacamano is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to bob sacamano For This Useful Post:
tcleve4911 (03-22-2012)
post #5 of 17 Old 03-22-2012, 12:45 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio (Akron)
Posts: 371
View autre's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob sacamano View Post

1/2 bits are better and safer than 1/4.

its time to invest in a new router.
-Or a good used one.
autre is offline  
post #6 of 17 Old 04-02-2012, 02:00 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 8
View Chairmon's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob sacamano View Post

1/2 bits are better and safer than 1/4.
Ok we are discussing dovetail bits, correct? and the size is 17/32, 7 Deg. I have that grind in both 1/4 and 1/2 shank size and wonder how the one is better than the other based solely on the shank size. I like using my OF1010 with this bit and cant use 1/2" shanks. I know it is commonly thrown out, but other than making the rounds on the net, is there any proof that this is the case in bits of this size?
Chairmon is offline  
post #7 of 17 Old 04-02-2012, 06:40 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,472
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Your "old" ( my old Craftsman is 3 times as old as yours) router is still perfectly good for most jobs. However, if you want to get into work like rail and stile cutting you will need more power.

Do not get rid of the old router, just add a newer one. As stated, most of the new ones are fine.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to GeorgeC For This Useful Post:
vinnypatternmaker (04-02-2012)
post #8 of 17 Old 04-02-2012, 06:50 AM
John
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: La Crosse, Kansas
Posts: 3,028
View jschaben's Photo Album My Photos
[QUOTE=Chairmon;323840]Ok we are discussing dovetail bits, correct? and the size is 17/32, 7 Deg. I have that grind in both 1/4 and 1/2 shank size and wonder how the one is better than the other based solely on the shank size. I like using my OF1010 with this bit and cant use 1/2" shanks. I know it is commonly thrown out, but other than making the rounds on the net, is there any proof that this is the case in bits of this size?[/QUOTE]

Not that I've seen. Many cases like that where I prefer 1/4" shank bits just for the added visibility.. Many newer routers only take 1/4" shank bits also, Trend T-4, DeWalt 611, New Porter Cable Trim/plunger (number escapes me).
Badmouthing 1/4" shank bits seems to come from the same mentality that says: "ya can't be a woodworker if ya don't use full-kerf Forrest blades". 1/4" bits will tend to vibrate sooner and even break if pushed to hard. Solution: don't push so hard.

John

If I strive for perfection, I can generally achieve good'nuff, If I strive for good'nuff, I generally achieve firewood
jschaben is offline  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to jschaben For This Useful Post:
mackem (04-03-2012), vinnypatternmaker (04-02-2012)
post #9 of 17 Old 04-02-2012, 10:32 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Posts: 479
View vinnypatternmaker's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
Your "old" ( my old Craftsman is 3 times as old as yours) router is still perfectly good for most jobs. However, if you want to get into work like rail and stile cutting you will need more power.

Do not get rid of the old router, just add a newer one. As stated, most of the new ones are fine.

George
Hi! I agree with George 100% ! There are still many uses for a 1/4" router, and if you still have the 1/4" bits to fit it, all the better!
Factor in the cost of buying new 1/2" bits for all your cutting needs,
and there goes your $50.00 "trade in" coupon !
Plenty of great 1/2" routers out there to choose from...and buying a 1/4" adapter for your 1/2" router, and changing it every time you change shank size is frankly a PITA ! Also, adapters may reduce accuracy.
If you switch bits fairly often, then 2 routers aint gonna be too many to own. MY $.02 worth.
Best, and thanx George,
Marena
vinnypatternmaker is offline  
post #10 of 17 Old 04-03-2012, 07:13 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Nothing wrong with 1/4" shanks. The work is pretty easy these days. So easy to get spoiled. Back "in the days", there was only single speed routers, and no plunge. All routing procedures were accomplished.

Dovetails...they look better handmade anyway. Machine cut looks too "perfect".




.
cabinetman is offline  
post #11 of 17 Old 04-03-2012, 12:13 PM
Senior Member
 
bob sacamano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: la mirada ca
Posts: 566
View bob sacamano's Photo Album My Photos
most cutters arent available in 1/4 inch. its not about a mentality. 1/2 shanks are safer - produce a better cut - and unless youre adding a simple roundover youll need a 1/2 collet to hold the cutters that are bigger more versatile. i cant remember any of my 1/4 bits vibrating.

how do you users of 1/4 collet routers make a 3/4" stopped dado ?

with that said i love my bosch colt with only a 1/4 inch collet - i use it as my dedicated 3/16 roundover and i still use my OLD OLD craftsman 1/4" collet as my dedicated 1/8" roundover ( ive had this puppy since about 9th grade )

build it right or not at all

Last edited by bob sacamano; 04-03-2012 at 12:25 PM.
bob sacamano is offline  
post #12 of 17 Old 04-03-2012, 12:21 PM
I hate tools
 
cocheseuga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Kennesaw, GA
Posts: 578
View cocheseuga's Photo Album My Photos
Another vote for keeping the old one if it works fine. I only use 1/4" in my battery-powered router, but they still have their place.
cocheseuga is offline  
post #13 of 17 Old 04-03-2012, 12:44 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by bob sacamano View Post
most cutters arent available in 1/4 inch. its not about a mentality.
Which bits are you referring to when you say "most"?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bob sacamano View Post
how do you users of 1/4 collet routers make a 3/4" stopped dado ?
Why would there be a problem with a 3/4" straight cutter with a 1/4" shank, making a stopped dado?





.
cabinetman is offline  
post #14 of 17 Old 04-04-2012, 12:54 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 298
View mveach's Photo Album My Photos
[QUOTE=cabinetman;324328]Which bits are you referring to when you say "most"?



Why would there be a problem with a 3/4" straight cutter with a 1/4" shank, making a stopped dado?



I'm with you oh this one. Back when I started using power tools, 1/2" routers were not available to the home woodworkers.

LIB MR DUCKS
mveach is offline  
post #15 of 17 Old 04-04-2012, 01:20 AM
Senior Member
 
bob sacamano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: la mirada ca
Posts: 566
View bob sacamano's Photo Album My Photos
[quote=mveach;324563]
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
Which bits are you referring to when you say "most"?



Why would there be a problem with a 3/4" straight cutter with a 1/4" shank, making a stopped dado?



I'm with you oh this one. Back when I started using power tools, 1/2" routers were not available to the home woodworkers.

theres not enough beef on the 1/4 shaft. the cutter is 3 times the size of the shaft thats holding it. add in the resistance from the cutting action and its asking alot .

sure 1/4" shafts are ok for small tasks.

by saying '' back when i started woodworking 1/2 inch wasnt available to home woodworkers "


are you using an 8 track player to listen to music ?
is your refridgerator made by norge ?
how about your television...... hi-def wide screen or black and white ?

welcome to 2012 where some routers even plunge !
i say all the above in jest only but my 2 cents says the answer to the original posters question is
" its time to invest in a new router"

build it right or not at all
bob sacamano is offline  
post #16 of 17 Old 04-04-2012, 08:37 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 298
View mveach's Photo Album My Photos
[quote=bob sacamano;324570]
Quote:
Originally Posted by mveach View Post


theres not enough beef on the 1/4 shaft. the cutter is 3 times the size of the shaft thats holding it. add in the resistance from the cutting action and its asking alot .

sure 1/4" shafts are ok for small tasks.

by saying '' back when i started woodworking 1/2 inch wasnt available to home woodworkers "


are you using an 8 track player to listen to music ?
is your refridgerator made by norge ?
how about your television...... hi-def wide screen or black and white ?

welcome to 2012 where some routers even plunge !
i say all the above in jest only but my 2 cents says the answer to the original posters question is
" its time to invest in a new router"
sarcasm is such an under appreciated form of communication isn't it!

My point was, even though all of my routers do have 1/2" as well as 1/4" collets, (and 3 of them even plunge, and have variable speed) routers that only take 1/4" bits can still be used for a number of tasks.

LIB MR DUCKS
mveach is offline  
post #17 of 17 Old 04-04-2012, 09:51 PM
John
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: La Crosse, Kansas
Posts: 3,028
View jschaben's Photo Album My Photos
Kind of a rule of thumb I've developed is anything under 3/8" cutting diameter is preferably a 1/4" shank, anything over 3/4" cutting diameter is preferable in 1/2" shank. In between it would be either or both, depending on the profile. Table I try to stick to 1/2" shanks because I will tend to push the feed rate some.

John

If I strive for perfection, I can generally achieve good'nuff, If I strive for good'nuff, I generally achieve firewood
jschaben is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to jschaben For This Useful Post:
autre (04-05-2012)
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First time router brett1 Power Tools & Machinery 18 03-17-2012 04:52 AM
first time using router joetab24 General Woodworking Discussion 5 03-13-2011 11:06 PM
Long time hobbyist, first time poster. Lislefan New Member Introductions 4 08-31-2009 11:55 AM
First time router table user. User3489 General Woodworking Discussion 13 02-10-2009 02:06 AM
Need First Time Router Table Help Tom5151 General Woodworking Discussion 22 01-26-2009 10:59 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome