Table Top Cracking. Help! - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 02:06 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 14
View bottlenosebob's Photo Album My Photos
Table Top Cracking. Help!

I am a total wood working noob and made a nice big kitchen table using Douglas Fir 2x6's (I know...) beveled edges, not finished, from Lowes. I used wood filler to fill the cracks on top, stained it, clearcoated, and did literally nothing to the bottom of the wood at all. It stayed smooth as glass for a month, now all the seams are cracked and wood filler is pretty useless and falling out. I know, I suck, I need a master's advice.

a. How do I fix this? Expoxy, bondo?
b. How should I go about making a table in the future with zero cracks, smooth as glass?

I am at your mercy.

Attached Images
 

Last edited by bottlenosebob; 03-07-2014 at 02:34 AM. Reason: needs a picture
bottlenosebob is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 03:22 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Otautahi , Te WahiPounamu ( Christchurch , New Zealand)
Posts: 1,494
View Manuka Jock's Photo Album My Photos
Bob ,
is that one wide slab of timber ,
or is it two slabs glued together ?

Can you give us two more photos , of the end grain , one from each end

Last edited by Manuka Jock; 03-07-2014 at 03:27 AM.
Manuka Jock is offline  
post #3 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 03:39 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 14
View bottlenosebob's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manuka Jock View Post
Bob ,
is that one wide slab of timber ,
or is it two slabs glued together ?

Can you give us two more photos , of the end grain , one from each end
It is (4) 2X6's glued together not jointed, just straight off the rack at Lowes. I know, I know, rookie mistakes all the way around. I want to try and fix this if possible. Also any advice for future tabletop making is appreciated! Thanks!
bottlenosebob is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 03:50 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Otautahi , Te WahiPounamu ( Christchurch , New Zealand)
Posts: 1,494
View Manuka Jock's Photo Album My Photos
Cut them apart on a ripping saw , run them across a jointer and reglue them .
Maybe you could do the other joins too , just to be sure .

And for future work , run the boards across a jointer .....

Last edited by Manuka Jock; 03-07-2014 at 03:52 AM.
Manuka Jock is offline  
post #5 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 03:59 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,152
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
one way to fix it is ...

Take a straight edge and a circular saw and cut exactly down the gap.
Then mate them together to see how they fit. If the gap is closed, reglue and clamp. If not, recut the gap until there is a perfect fit.
As long as the saw blade goes in a straight line and is square to the surfaces you won't need a jointer.

Always apply a finish to both sides of the wood to prevent uneven shrinkage and expansion.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 03-07-2014 at 06:40 AM. Reason: typos
woodnthings is offline  
post #6 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 04:24 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos



We have an introduction section where you can say a few words about yourself. If you fill out your profile in your "User Control Panel", you can list any hobbies, experience or other facts. You can also list your general geographical location which would be a help in answering some questions. In doing that your location will show under your username when you post.

You can flip the top upside down and clamp a straightedge to the top so a circular saw blade will cut the boards apart. You may have to make a pass on each board that's mated to get back to clean wood.

Or, you could rip them apart on a table saw, good side up, using the same methods. When the edges are cut, they should be dry fitted together to see how they mate. If they fit with no gaps and it will only take minimal clamping pressure to bring them together, add glue and clamp them together. You might want to only glue one joint at a time. That would make for an easier setup.









.
cabinetman is offline  
post #7 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 06:11 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 57
View kwolfe's Photo Album My Photos
I agree with cutting it down the seems. Not sure what tools you have but a circular saw would work. It would get a better blade for it though. Rip it lengthwise down the glue joint using a fence guide. If the edges are not smooth and don't mate well, then take maybe 1/4 off each side until they do. Then reglue and clamp together.

Also, before you do anything, you could try using a much of pocket hole screws underneath to see if you can pull the gap closed. Not the best solution but not sure how involved you want to get.
kwolfe is offline  
post #8 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 08:38 AM
novice wood hacker
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 514
View d_slat's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post

Always apply a finish to both sides of the wood to prevent uneven shrinkage and expansion.
Make sure to follow this advice. Douglas fir moves a lot with changing humidity. If you only seal the top it will tend to curl and break out your wood filler.
d_slat is offline  
post #9 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 10:46 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Coastal NC
Posts: 1,160
View HowardAcheson's Photo Album My Photos
Turn the table over and take some pictures of the support system. It looks like you have some cross grain construction that is causing the problem.

Howie..........
HowardAcheson is offline  
post #10 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 04:31 PM
Senior Member
 
Maylar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: South Central Connecticut
Posts: 1,151
View Maylar's Photo Album My Photos
We need to see what's under the top. Your problem may be due more to how you attached the top to the frame than anything else.

Dave in CT, USA
Maylar is offline  
post #11 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 04:54 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
It could be that the joined edges were not mated well, and came apart.





.
cabinetman is offline  
post #12 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 05:08 PM
Smart and Cool
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 1,856
View shoot summ's Photo Album My Photos
Looks like shrinkage, most of the Home Center lumber is pretty wet.

As others have stated, the boards need to be re-cut, fit, then glued back together. Then make sure all sides are finished.
shoot summ is online now  
post #13 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 05:13 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Otautahi , Te WahiPounamu ( Christchurch , New Zealand)
Posts: 1,494
View Manuka Jock's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
It could be that the joined edges were not mated well, and came apart.
Not mated well it is I reckon
Quote:
beveled edges, not finished, from Lowes

It is (4) 2X6's glued together not jointed, just straight off the rack at Lowes
Manuka Jock is offline  
post #14 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 05:25 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manuka Jock View Post
Not mated well it is I reckon
Rather than blaming some infrastructure holding the top to the frame.





.
cabinetman is offline  
post #15 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 06:28 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 14
View bottlenosebob's Photo Album My Photos
Ahhhh!

Thanks for all the advice fellas. Obviously this is a HUGE learning opportunity for me. I literally did nothing to the bottom as far as stain or anything, see the pictures. I also screwed it on form the top using a countersink bit and filled the holes so it'd be a pain to unscrew it all. Would staining the bottom and using black epoxy work to if unscrewing is not an option?

And for the next one (a brand new build), I should used jointed wood, glue -up and clamp it up AND THEN mount it correct? Is the glue and clamps all I would need to keep it together before mounting? Should I use a nail gun or something to hold it together too? Thanks for all the help, I am learning a lot from you guys.

Attached Images
    

Last edited by bottlenosebob; 03-07-2014 at 06:34 PM. Reason: pics
bottlenosebob is offline  
post #16 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 07:31 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 25,995
View Steve Neul's Photo Album My Photos
The would for the top should have been run across a jointer but you also need to dry fit them to the point where you couldn't slide a sheet of paper through. Pine is a bit resistant to being glued. It would be helpful if you would run a spline in the wood to help the joints. If not a spline you might use dowels or biscuits to help the joint. Then use glue and clamps.
Steve Neul is offline  
post #17 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 08:12 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Otautahi , Te WahiPounamu ( Christchurch , New Zealand)
Posts: 1,494
View Manuka Jock's Photo Album My Photos
Man , you could construct a house on that floor

Bob , check these out
How to build a table


Fix that table as best you can and use it for a workbench , it looks to be well made and sturdy enough for one .

cheers

Last edited by Manuka Jock; 03-07-2014 at 08:17 PM.
Manuka Jock is offline  
post #18 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 08:14 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Otautahi , Te WahiPounamu ( Christchurch , New Zealand)
Posts: 1,494
View Manuka Jock's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
Rather than blaming some infrastructure holding the top to the frame.
Not that infrastructure , that's for sure
Manuka Jock is offline  
post #19 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 09:46 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 14
View bottlenosebob's Photo Album My Photos
Yeah, I suck, I know, I could use it for a nuclear bomb bunker.
bottlenosebob is offline  
post #20 of 45 Old 03-07-2014, 10:02 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Otautahi , Te WahiPounamu ( Christchurch , New Zealand)
Posts: 1,494
View Manuka Jock's Photo Album My Photos
Suck ?

Bob ,
Don't be so hard on yourself .
First time out you built a good strong table .
A bit of a glitch with the top that is easily fixed .
Fix it , and then build another one on your new work bench

But No NailGun , not for fine furniture

Last edited by Manuka Jock; 03-07-2014 at 10:06 PM.
Manuka Jock is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Manuka Jock For This Useful Post:
bottlenosebob (03-07-2014)
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help! my dinning table is cracking walleye vision General Woodworking Discussion 7 01-04-2014 01:19 PM
First Pen, Cracking CA Dogwood Woodturning 4 04-16-2013 09:32 AM
Cracking wiretwister Woodturning 14 09-28-2012 11:08 AM
What caused this cracking? sprior Woodturning 17 04-12-2012 05:49 PM
I'm in trouble. Oak Table Cracking. eubean General Woodworking Discussion 17 10-02-2011 06:53 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome