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post #21 of 28 Old 09-16-2011, 11:10 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cellophane
How do you keep your pull saw blade from wandering? I have one with a pretty then blade and it likes to wiggle quite a bit... Probably user error

otherwise - GREAT post!
This is why questions are important! For deep cuts I started with a back saw which will cut straight every time but will not cut deep enough then moved to the pull saw to finish it. The existing cut is then a guide for the pull saw.

I have a better hand rip saw I could have used but it needs some tuning and sharpening... One of these days...

I also tweaking the angle with a plane but free hand, no shooting board as I've never gotten around to building one...

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
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post #22 of 28 Old 09-16-2011, 11:15 AM Thread Starter
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Oh, and I forgot to mention to slightly dish the cutout with your chisel for a tight fit in the corners. In other words from corner to corner have a slight bow in on the bottom of the dado.

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
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post #23 of 28 Old 09-16-2011, 12:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cellophane
How do you keep your pull saw blade from wandering? I have one with a pretty then blade and it likes to wiggle quite a bit... Probably user error

otherwise - GREAT post!
A wandering saw could be how you hold it and your stance. There's much info online on that subject. I like a dovetail saw with almost no set in the teeth. Once the cut is started, it will continue following that line.

Another trick is to use a DT saw, and clamp a scrap wood guide along the cut line to help bi Jose the saw along.

Quote:
Originally Posted by firemedic
Oh, and I forgot to mention to slightly dish the cutout with your chisel for a tight fit in the corners. In other words from corner to corner have a slight bow in on the bottom of the dado.

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
Excellent tip, young one. The bottom of the slot would be end grain = not much strength. A little gap would be OK if the outside edges end up tight.
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post #24 of 28 Old 09-16-2011, 02:32 PM
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Thanks =) I only find the wandering on the pull saw - the english saws I have are fairly stiff and don't wander much. I'll see what I can find online.

For the splines - how do you determine the depth of cut relative to the wood?
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post #25 of 28 Old 09-16-2011, 03:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cellophane View Post
For the splines - how do you determine the depth of cut relative to the wood?
The rule of thumb I use is just over half the thickness of the piece at the corner, but less than 3/4. I suppose it doesn't really matter as long as you don't go all the way through.

If Woodworking is so much fun why isn't it called WoodFUNNING?

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post #26 of 28 Old 09-16-2011, 07:38 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by johnnie52
[...] long as you don't go all the way through.
that's how I look at it... Like most everything in ww'n... Builder preference

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
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post #27 of 28 Old 09-17-2011, 12:14 PM
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Thank you for the tutorial. I already had a good idea of how to make splined joints but, having never done one, yet, it sure is nice to have a step by step explanation.
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post #28 of 28 Old 03-18-2016, 06:48 PM
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Great tutorial! I found this in a search and didn't think to check the post date before writing a comment, so it's probably old... Anyway...

I have recently been planning a cabinet that will include spline mitered doors. I have seen the tutorials for making this joint on a table saw, but I am in a bandsaw-and-hand-tool-only shop at the
moment. I like the idea of using a spline the width of the kerf of a saw, however my only decent back saw is a Japanese saw with a ridiculously small kerf! I'm not sure if a spline that thin would give much strength to a door frame. I'll have to try your method of using a chisel and two saw kerf to clear the slot.

Also, to the commenter who mentioned their japanese pull saw wandering - I have this problem too! My standard panel saw cuts straight, but for a long/deep cut I can't get my pull saw to stop following the grain. It's so flexible that even if I try to correct the twist once it's started I can't! So I don't use it for long cuts anymore. It's still great for shorter/shallow cuts, though.

And maybe it's just the wood I'm using. This is my first real project, and I chose red oak because it is cheap and available everywhere. After working with some other hardwoods in some side projects (Walnut, beech), I wish I had chosen a wood that is a bit easier to work with you hand tools. Next time... Walnut is so lovely to work! It's like it *wants* to be smooth.
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