squeeze out on glue up - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 26 Old 03-09-2012, 03:35 PM
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I may have missed it but how many boards are you using? If you are using four boards, you could glue up two halfs and then glue the two halfs together the next day after the first two halfs have cured.
It would be more managable trying to clean the joint up on the halfs then the whole top at one time. I use the cauls just like it is explained in the tutuorial, I use parrafin wax on the bottom of the cauls since I hand plane or scrape my tops I am not worried about the parrafin.

Usually 1' spacing works for me on the clamps and I learned that gluing up two boards instead of four, you can get a pretty consistent joint without cauls.

+1 one on cleaning up the glue after the glues dries a little bit, but I usually wait about 30-40 minutes and scrape it off with a paint scraper. The scraper can scratct the wood, but planing takes care of that. Dont wait to long or the glue will take the wood surface up with it if it has time to dry.
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post #22 of 26 Old 03-09-2012, 11:02 PM
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A few more pointers...Do a dry fit first. Use a strip of hardwood along each edge for your clamps to crush so you don't damage the edge of your table. Where your clamps touch the glue and the wood, you may get black stains in the wood, which may or may not get planed out...to avoid, lay a strip of plastic under the clamp. A strip of plastic works for keeping the cauls from sticking, also. I use a paint roller to spread the glue evenly and quickly. An even layer of glue, no dry spots, is the key. Get the pieces together before the glue dries out...that's why you do a dry run, so you aren't running around like a mad man to find something you forgot while the glue is drying in the open. Start clamping from one end and have somebody raise and lower boards to get them level as you tighten the clamps (this works instead of or along with the cauls). 10" apart is good, not much more. In 44" a pipe clamp will start to bow quite a bit. I use Jorgenson I beam bar clamps...they stay straight a lot better...just watch the amount of pressure top vs. bottom...even with cauls, if you apply way to much pressure to one side, you create a warped top. You should be able to remove the cauls once the clamps are tight...that's when you check the flatness of the top...adjust the clamp pressure so the top is flat...use a straight edge laid across the top as a guide. Another hint. If you get a stubborn board that won't line up, try putting a shim under the caul and forcing it into line...time is against you, though. If you have a friend, have them there to help. It sucks to need help when nobody is around. There is probably more, but these will help. That dry run will teach you a lot.
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post #23 of 26 Old 03-19-2012, 10:39 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the pointers guys. I did do the dry run got everything ready and started the glue up. I was a mad man running around gluing all joints and panicked and had to drag my fiance out to help with the glueing - I had no idea how long I had until the joints had to be mated (clamped) after placing glue on the them... It all ended up turning out good though. I did learn a lesson though. I used cauls to help ensure they were all flush but my boards were not all planed to the exact thickness. I had my 2 parallel bar clamps on the bottom (of panel and actual bottom of table) along with my 4 other bar clamps alternated along panel. What happened was the boards all lined up flush on bottom and the thickness difference of boards was noticeable on what was to be my table top. I hand planed and sanded everything down to a nice finish. But with what I have to work with, I will from now on place the boards top down on my set up and it should all be good.

As for an update, I have the top finished down to 150 finish and table flipped over attaching apron currently. I have chosen a dark walnut stain and stained bottom prior to attaching apron. Finish looks great - cant wait to see the finished product! I've attached a few pics of the glue up, cleaned up panel and a sample of the stain showing the character of the cypress boards I'm working with. Sorry for the poor quality - iphone pics...
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post #24 of 26 Old 03-19-2012, 10:49 PM
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Looking good! First glue-ups are an educational experience DAMHIK!

Before you stain the top check this out:

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post #25 of 26 Old 03-20-2012, 01:52 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shop Dad View Post
Looking good! First glue-ups are an educational experience DAMHIK!

Before you stain the top check this out:

Blotch Control: CN's Pre-Color Conditioner - YouTube


Now, will his pre-color conditioner just prevent blotching and leave the same differences (some dark and some light) in the pieces or will it create the appearance that all pieces are the same color/tint? I really like the difference in the boards color and would like to keep it, but after seeing this video I clearly see the blotching. Forgive me if that is a stupid question, but the coat of stain you see on the bottom of table in pictures was the first stain I have ever wiped on/applied...
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post #26 of 26 Old 03-20-2012, 07:10 PM
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Test on some scrap first. It should be ok and smooth out the blotches but not change the character. Light reflects differently by the grain direction and that shouldn't change but always test.
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