should I use corner clamps? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 19 Old 01-02-2014, 05:11 PM Thread Starter
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should I use corner clamps?

Building a bookshelf with 3/4 inch plywood (AC pine). The bottom of it is a piece of 2x12 I had tying around. I was going to screw the sides into the bottom piece with wood glue. And I was going to use finishing nails and wood glue on the top shelf (and maybe reinforce it with something to make it more load bearing). But, should I use corner clamps when I assemble them, and while the glue dries?
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post #2 of 19 Old 01-03-2014, 07:24 AM
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the screws and nails can hold the piece while the glue dries. when you measure diagonally for square, you can place a long clamp on the diagonal that is too large to hold it square until it dries.

you may consider installing permanent corner gussets, or a back, that will help keep the cabinet square also.
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post #3 of 19 Old 01-03-2014, 07:34 AM
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Clamps or...

If you don't have a long clamp, just tack a 1 X 2 on a diagonal from the short edge to the long edge. A couple of these will hold it square until the glue dries. Check for a square corner before tacking it on.

I love the open shelf look, but I only use that on built-ins between 2 walls. The ends and verticals have dados and center shelf is cut to be a wedge fit to secure the whole unit and is slid into place last.

Free standing book shelves should have a back which will hold things square AND add rigidity. Books are heavy and when set into motion by a bump will carry that energy and it may crack or collapse.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #4 of 19 Old 01-03-2014, 07:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corbmonster View Post
Building a bookshelf with 3/4 inch plywood (AC pine). The bottom of it is a piece of 2x12 I had tying around. I was going to screw the sides into the bottom piece with wood glue. And I was going to use finishing nails and wood glue on the top shelf (and maybe reinforce it with something to make it more load bearing). But, should I use corner clamps when I assemble them, and while the glue dries?
You don't necessarily have to have corner clamps per-se, but they help. If the parts fit and mate, screws or nails will bring them together.

If you don't have a clamp long enough to go corner to corner to square the box, use a strip of wood...can be anything, even like a 1x2. As you glue and screw or nail the corners, tack one corner down with the strip of wood. Take a corner to corner measurement for square and position the strip of wood on the cross corner to where the cabinet is in square and tack it down, You could use finishing nails, as this is only temporary until the glue dries. After it dries, remove the strip of wood.






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post #5 of 19 Old 01-03-2014, 10:22 AM
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Free standing book shelves should have a back which will hold things square AND add rigidity. Books are heavy and when set into motion by a bump will carry that energy and it may crack or collapse.
This is a must. The thing will rack otherwise, for sure.
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post #6 of 19 Old 01-03-2014, 12:09 PM
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This is a must. The thing will rack otherwise, for sure.
Either that or tie them to the wall.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #7 of 19 Old 01-03-2014, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the tips guys. And yes I will be putting a backing on it, but that will be the last thing I do. I guess thickness doesn't matter so much for that right? like 1/4 inch or even less is fine? And what should I use to secure it? Really small wood screws? finishing nails? Brads?
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post #8 of 19 Old 01-03-2014, 03:41 PM Thread Starter
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And just so I know and we are clear: How I was going to secure the top with finishing nails and wood glue, that's fine right? Or should I consider using some type of cleat to support it? Like some quarter round, or some type of bracket? FYI, the top will be sitting in between the sides, not on top of them. Had I planned this all over again, I would have designed the top to sit on top of the sides.
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post #9 of 19 Old 01-03-2014, 04:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corbmonster View Post
And just so I know and we are clear: How I was going to secure the top with finishing nails and wood glue, that's fine right? Or should I consider using some type of cleat to support it? Like some quarter round, or some type of bracket? FYI, the top will be sitting in between the sides, not on top of them. Had I planned this all over again, I would have designed the top to sit on top of the sides.
It would really help if you posted a drawing of some sort so the details can be seen, instead of us addressing a general description.






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post #10 of 19 Old 01-03-2014, 04:45 PM
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top shelf support

Quote:
Originally Posted by corbmonster View Post
Building a bookshelf with 3/4 inch plywood (AC pine). The bottom of it is a piece of 2x12 I had tying around. I was going to screw the sides into the bottom piece with wood glue. And I was going to use finishing nails and wood glue on the top shelf (and maybe reinforce it with something to make it more load bearing). But, should I use corner clamps when I assemble them, and while the glue dries?
Quote:
Originally Posted by corbmonster View Post
And just so I know and we are clear: How I was going to secure the top with finishing nails and wood glue, that's fine right? Or should I consider using some type of cleat to support it? Like some quarter round, or some type of bracket? FYI, the top will be sitting in between the sides, not on top of them. Had I planned this all over again, I would have designed the top to sit on top of the sides.
You should not have made the top to fit between the sides. Oh Well, now what? Cleats will work, but they will show. Screws will not show and will work, but end grain is not the strongest.
Another approach would be to add "ends" on the top and not fit it in between the sides. This strikes me as the best approach. The ends can be glued on and secured with nails or screws.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #11 of 19 Old 01-03-2014, 05:58 PM Thread Starter
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My drawing ability are really hideous.... I can try my hand (puntastic) at something legible tonight.
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post #12 of 19 Old 01-03-2014, 09:39 PM
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How tall is this?

Are you edge-banding your plywood?
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post #13 of 19 Old 01-05-2014, 02:35 PM Thread Starter
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Sorry my handwriting is so horrible. Over all, 4 foot tall by 36 wide. I do have plans to put a backing on it even though that is not sketched on. Yes, it does / will have edge strips. Does the thickness really batter for the backing? .25 inch or less would be ok right?
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post #14 of 19 Old 01-05-2014, 03:00 PM Thread Starter
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my goodness this was such a pain to try and get posted. It seems it is too large to attach to a post in the forum. But if I shrink it down it's kinda hard to read my atrocious handwriting. So here is a link instead. http://imgur.com/siKaW0L
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post #15 of 19 Old 01-06-2014, 05:38 AM
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If the top is not going to hold a ton of weight, your design is fine. Mass-produced cabinets have this design, where the shelves and top are cut to fit between the sides. You could put a rabbit in your outside pieces, and cut your shelves down 1/4" for the backing, so you don't see it from the side.

I would recommend putting a toekick on the bottom, recessed 3/4 or more inches. Put a rail front and back. This way the ends can go all the way to the floor, and you won't have the bottom board flat on the floor with unequal air/moisture, which may cause warpage.
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post #16 of 19 Old 01-09-2014, 12:34 PM Thread Starter
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I glued, clamped, and nailed one of the top corners last night. There was an ever so slight gap between the top, and the side where they meet in some spots. Really small. Maybe 1/16th inch. The glue is bonding the two pieces together, you can't see through the gap. I wish I took a pic last night. But there is a crevice / concavity in the gap at the top. Should I fill with wood filler? Or just not care?
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post #17 of 19 Old 01-09-2014, 02:09 PM
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small gaps?

In my opinion a small gap would be a 1/64" not a 1/16". How it looks is up to you as to whether to fill it or leave it. If you can live with then fine. If you can fix it that's even better. You will learn a bit by fixing a mistake rather than leaving it.... just sayin'

For what it's worth, a fill is not a fix in the strictest terms, it's patch..... Been there. done that a few times. The best fixes as those that are not visible to the uninformed, but known only by the builder.

Finally, a gap that is not structural and only visual and may not even show is probably OK.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 01-09-2014 at 02:18 PM.
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post #18 of 19 Old 01-12-2014, 12:47 PM
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I hope, I don't change the subject to much, but I'm looking at buying a corner clamp. The one I'm looking at is buy Irwin.

Name:  image-4067333825.jpg
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It doesn't seem to have very good reviews. I was wondering if anyone out there has used it and likes it or does like it. I would be using it to make a business card holder.

should I use corner clamps?-image-2809399876.jpg

Thanks.

Eric
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post #19 of 19 Old 01-12-2014, 06:55 PM
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Hey Eric, I bought one of those and I agree with the negative reviews.
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