Should I use biscuit joinery? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 01-20-2018, 10:51 PM Thread Starter
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Should I use biscuit joinery?

This is a trophy case, the top glass box is missing from the photos. The photos show the base.

When I built this I originally just glued the legs to the bottom of the base. That didn't hold well so I added the metal straps. You can see where the metal straps aren't working, the legs bend inward.

What's the right solution to attach the legs to the base? I've never used a biscuit joint, but I'm wondering if that's an effective solution?

Thanks.
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post #2 of 6 Old 01-21-2018, 05:27 AM
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Biscuit jointer isn't the fix you're looking for. I like the overall look of the table but the design of the legs could use a bit of tweaking. The legs don't just support the top, they keep the table from falling over. In your current design you butted the legs into the apron of the table. That is a very weak joint at a very important location. Having said that, with the parts that you've already got, my best advice would be to create a large loose tenon that goes into the top of the legs and into the bottom of the apron. This basically creates a mortise and tenon joint.
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post #3 of 6 Old 01-21-2018, 06:25 AM
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Loose tenons will probably fix the joint. However, if it was me, I would rebuild the legs so that the legs go all the way to the top on the inside of the aprons. To do this you would have to cut/mill out a section of the leg that is equal in depth to the thickness of the apron.

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post #4 of 6 Old 01-21-2018, 07:47 AM
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Biscuits are better on a long joint. They are so small they only help a little so in this case they would have helped very little. Dowels would have made a much better joint and if you got a doweling jig would be almost as easy to do as the biscuit joint.
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post #5 of 6 Old 01-21-2018, 03:10 PM
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An end grain to long grain butt joint never works well, a biscuit will be of little help, you need either a tongue or a dowel to achieve the strength you are looking for, a dowel being the easiest at this point.
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post #6 of 6 Old 01-21-2018, 03:30 PM
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George is right. I have a miniature biscuit joiner that uses biscuits down to 1/2" and it would not be a solution for this problem. The issue at hand is the joinery of the cabinet itself. The small area of the end grain joint provides little or no strength. It would not have lasted long at all. Given the small dimensions of the stiles, they must be let into the base and top pieces to provide structural strength. I would have done a half lap sort of join between the uprights and the base. That would provide a long grain to long grain glue joint. What I see is like a table with the legs butt glued to the underside of the top. Sorry, but I see no way to fix this problem. Dowels or tenons might do it, but getting things aligned after the fact will be tough. I would start over with a proper design.

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Last edited by Jim Frye; 01-21-2018 at 03:51 PM. Reason: added text
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