Shop Drawer Joinery - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 03-05-2013, 09:49 PM Thread Starter
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Shop Drawer Joinery

I am working on a project where I am making shop drawers. The plan calls for the joinery to follow the picture. I have never done this before and was wondering if there was a fool-proof way to get it all to fit properly (front fits exactly flush, etc) or if it's mostly trial-error with scrap. Logically, it seems easy, however, there is a lot to match up. I have usually rabbetted the side, and glued/nailed front in. Also, I will be using a router table.

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post #2 of 12 Old 03-05-2013, 10:14 PM
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http://www.ebay.com/itm/370759552522...84.m1497.l2649

You could use this bit. Then either a router or table saw for the other"Bottom"
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post #3 of 12 Old 03-05-2013, 10:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crick07 View Post
I am working on a project where I am making shop drawers. The plan calls for the joinery to follow the picture. I have never done this before and was wondering if there was a fool-proof way to get it all to fit properly (front fits exactly flush, etc) or if it's mostly trial-error with scrap. Logically, it seems easy, however, there is a lot to match up. I have usually rabbetted the side, and glued/nailed front in. Also, I will be using a router table.

That joint is about as goof resistant as any I've ever encountered, just keep with the 1/4"-1/4"-1/4". I usually set up the router table, with a slot cutter just need the one setup.

John

If I strive for perfection, I can generally achieve good'nuff, If I strive for good'nuff, I generally achieve firewood
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post #4 of 12 Old 03-05-2013, 10:29 PM Thread Starter
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I'm sure I'm just over thinking it
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post #5 of 12 Old 03-05-2013, 11:32 PM
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It is very basic, just do it! You will eventually find this joint too simple and will gravitate toward hand dovetails. Really. Just takes a little practice.

Bret
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post #6 of 12 Old 03-06-2013, 12:11 AM
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Put a 1/4-inch bit in the router table, and adjust it until the height is 1/4-inches above the table.

Then use a 1/4-inch gauge block between the fence and the bit to set your fence.

Run the sides through with the inside down on the table.

Run the front and back through with inside face against the fence.

Now use the dado in the sides as the starting point and cut a groove for a 1/4-inch plywood bottom. Cut the groove full length of the front and back to receive the bottom.

All with one setup of the router table. The tricky part is to make sure all of your pieces are truly square. That is the only thing that can mess you up.
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post #7 of 12 Old 03-06-2013, 12:33 AM
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Forgot to tell you that to do the groove for the bottom in the sides you set a dado down over the bit, and set a stop on the other end, and then move to the other dado and set the other stop block. You are now ready to cut the grooves for the bottom.
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post #8 of 12 Old 03-06-2013, 01:24 AM
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It can also be a pain if the stock is not exactly 1/2" thick. Most 1/2" ply is not really 1/2" thick, it's more like 15/32" or 12mm or something.

That can mess up the way things line up. You can also end up with a loose joint, because after taking 1/4" off for the rabbet, what is left (on the bottom piece in the pic) is less than 1/4" -- it is 7/32"

That is why I use the 1/2" poplar project pieces when i can. That stuff is much more faithful about being 1/2" thick.

Last edited by Chris Curl; 03-06-2013 at 01:29 AM.
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post #9 of 12 Old 03-06-2013, 08:00 AM
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I have usually rabbetted the side, and glued/nailed front in.
What's wrong with that method? Rabbeting can be done on the table saw.






.
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post #10 of 12 Old 03-06-2013, 11:49 AM Thread Starter
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Nothing, just want to learn something new
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post #11 of 12 Old 03-06-2013, 09:19 PM Thread Starter
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I know it's not ground-breaking or anything but I did a practice tonight and I think I got it. Here is a pic:



Also, as someone stated since the plywood measures about .48" thick you end up with a sliver of overhang that I'll have to sand flush. Here is a pic showing that:



Edit: Come to think of it, I can use a flush trim bit to knock the overhang off.

Last edited by Crick07; 03-06-2013 at 09:21 PM.
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post #12 of 12 Old 03-06-2013, 09:56 PM
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Also, as someone stated since the plywood measures about .48" thick you end up with a sliver of overhang that I'll have to sand flush.
That was me. :)

Can you tell I learned that through trial and error?

Looks good! You might play around a little with the "project" 1/2" poplar to see how it is different with wood that is closer to a true 1/2"
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