Screws or nails for 2x4 pyramid cribbing - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 02:17 AM Thread Starter
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Screws or nails for 2x4 pyramid cribbing

Hi,

I'm making jack stands by stacking 2x4s on top of each other in a pyramid similar to the pictures here:
http://minniebiz.com/gmcmotorhome/20...he-first-time/

My question is: what is the best way to join the 2x4s together. Should I use deck screws, lag bolts, nails, or something else.

Since it is a pyramid structure, I understand there will be some shear force. Are nails better here?

Thanks!
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post #2 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 02:27 AM
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Are the ones in the photo made with Doug Fir ?

and what timber do you intend making yours with
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post #3 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 02:52 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the reply. I'm not sure about the ones in the picture but I'm using kiln dried whitewood studs from HD. Do you think those would be OK?
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post #4 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 03:10 AM
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I have no idea what whitewood is .

Does it split easily ?
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post #5 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 05:53 AM
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White wood is just the stores generispc term for pine basically. I don't think it really matters which you use. All of the force is going to be vertical. The nails or screws just resist lateral movement. I would use glue as well though.
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post #6 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 06:06 AM
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Sometimes a vehicle will shift sideways when you have it jacked up and wood might not be up to the job. I wouldn't feel comfortable using homemade jackstands at all. You can buy jackstands pretty cheap and they are adjustable to the different sizes you might need and seem to last forever. I think mine are about 30 years old.
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post #7 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 07:14 AM
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Pine off-cut axel stands , thats' a recipe for disaster
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post #8 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 07:21 AM
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'I am with Steve, I do not like the idea of home made jack stands.

However, if I was going to do so I would use nothing less than 2x6 oak for the material. I would not care whether or not it was nailed, screwed or glued together.

George
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post #9 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 10:11 AM
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http://www.harborfreight.com/6-ton-j...set-38847.html

Much cheaper than medical bills after a vehicle falls on you!
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post #10 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 10:22 AM
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+1 on all the above.Buy some steel ones .Every Walmart has them if you don't want to go HF.If you have the wood for free you will still have $20 in screws and glue and a bunch of time involved with all of those pieces.
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post #11 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 01:48 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the replies everyone. I really appreciate your advice. However, the main reason I am thinking about building these wood jack stands is because of reports of the steel jack stands failing, causing severe injury and death. Here are a couple of reports:
http://www.914world.com/bbs2/index.p...pic=70117&st=0
http://www.thehulltruth.com/dockside...der-car.html#b

I read on a couple of forums that some people are successfully using wood jack stands because of wood's compression strength. Also I read that wood cribbing is quite strong.

Would you say that the main objection to wood jack stands as I am building them is the type of wood or the pyramid design where the vehicle's contact point is a thin pinch weld.

Thanks again.
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post #12 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 04:32 PM
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It's easy to pick out a couple examples and use that as a solid justification for any action. Both those examples are with ratchet type jack stands and as mentioned in the 914 forum thread, OSHA only approves pin style stands. No chance of malfunction. Yes, welds can break but so can wood. Proper inspection and upkeep is required with any tool or piece of equipment. I'm curious about insurance and liability as well. I wouldn't want to be you if your insurance catches wind that you were using homemade jackstands rather than ANSI or OSHA approved stands. If you are absolutely set on making stands out of wood I would do the solid stacked like these from the Porsche thread


The extra money you spend on lumber would be worth the piece of mind.

I've done quite a bit of wrenching myself, so I'm not totally talking out my a**, I used to have an old Datsun Z that I did a Chevy V8 swap on, but at the end of the day this is the internet and nothing can replace your own common sense.

Ben


OT: what type of vehicle are you planning on jacking up?

Last edited by bschiltz; 02-24-2014 at 04:34 PM.
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post #13 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 04:34 PM
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The chance of a GOOD/WELL BUILT AND DESIGNED jack stand failing is very, very small. I would say the chance of it failing is much less than a home brew wooden jack stand.

However, to each his own.

GMC
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post #14 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 04:38 PM
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Please don't use wood. Buy good quality steel stands.

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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post #15 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 05:30 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by bschiltz View Post
OT: what type of vehicle are you planning on jacking up?
I have a 95 Honda Prelude and a Honda Fit. So both are light weight low profile cars.
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post #16 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 05:45 PM
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Setting houses on cribbing is common so I don't see a problem. As for fastening, use whatever pleases you because the advantage there is to move the crib around as a unit. After the weight is applied it would be difficult to drive a member out with a sledge.
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post #17 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 05:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bschiltz View Post
It's easy to pick out a couple examples and use that as a solid justification for any action. Both those examples are with ratchet type jack stands and as mentioned in the 914 forum thread, OSHA only approves pin style stands. No chance of malfunction. Yes, welds can break but so can wood. Proper inspection and upkeep is required with any tool or piece of equipment. I'm curious about insurance and liability as well. I wouldn't want to be you if your insurance catches wind that you were using homemade jackstands rather than ANSI or OSHA approved stands. If you are absolutely set on making stands out of wood I would do the solid stacked like these from the Porsche thread


The extra money you spend on lumber would be worth the piece of mind.

I've done quite a bit of wrenching myself, so I'm not totally talking out my a**, I used to have an old Datsun Z that I did a Chevy V8 swap on, but at the end of the day this is the internet and nothing can replace your own common sense.

Ben


OT: what type of vehicle are you planning on jacking up?
I would be willing to use those.
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post #18 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 06:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SandburRanch View Post
Setting houses on cribbing is common so I don't see a problem. As for fastening, use whatever pleases you because the advantage there is to move the crib around as a unit. After the weight is applied it would be difficult to drive a member out with a sledge.
Houses don't sit on 4 points , and the many points they do sit on are not made from nondescript softwood offcuts that have been nailed or screwed together .
Under pressure , and movement , those wee bits of wood can split along the nail/screw lines and even glue will not stop structural failure .

Last edited by Manuka Jock; 02-24-2014 at 06:24 PM.
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post #19 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 06:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by underdawg View Post
Thanks everyone.
I have a 95 Honda Prelude and a Honda Fit. So both are light weight low profile cars.
And how about the next vehicle that they get plonked under ?

If you must use wood , hunt around for 4 solid square cube Hardwood blocks akin to the ones used under mobile crane stabilizers.

The ones from the Porsche thread look ok

Last edited by Manuka Jock; 02-24-2014 at 06:30 PM.
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post #20 of 20 Old 02-24-2014, 06:30 PM
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If you insist, as others have said they should be larger stock than 2x4 and hardwood. Pine 2x4s are to easy to split.

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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