routed edge joints - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 02-03-2011, 11:10 PM Thread Starter
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routed edge joints

anyone with war stories or praises of a routed glue joint? I'm building a cradle and modified my plans that included ugly laps with a routed glue joint for edge joints. Any advise for strength with this? I would only assume that they would be much stronger than an edge joint using biscuits or dowels, right?

~Greg
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post #2 of 8 Old 02-07-2011, 12:23 PM
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I have not used routed joints for gluing as of yet.

My guess is depending on the area that you are considering, it may be okay but in most cases it's overkill as the glue is stronger than the wood, when applied properly.

If you are conserned about alignment issues, I would consider dowels or pocket screws.

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Where did I put that tape measure???
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post #3 of 8 Old 02-07-2011, 12:43 PM
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anyone with war stories or praises of a routed glue joint? I'm building a cradle and modified my plans that included ugly laps with a routed glue joint for edge joints. Any advise for strength with this? I would only assume that they would be much stronger than an edge joint using biscuits or dowels, right?
Which joints are you referring to? However a joint is made if it's fitted well and the mating parts match well, it makes for a good joint.










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post #4 of 8 Old 02-07-2011, 01:14 PM
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The main advantage of running a glue joint profile is that it keeps the parts aligned. More-so than biscuits since it is along the entire length.
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post #5 of 8 Old 02-08-2011, 12:04 AM Thread Starter
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I'm done with the joining of pieces and I'll be building a new router table before doing any more of them. Mine sucks, in that it does a good job until you need precision. The joints didn't line up all too well, good enough but not to my liking. I even went the distance to buy frued bit rather than a no name single use. I'll eventually post pics of this project provided I can be proud enough of it to do so!

~Greg
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post #6 of 8 Old 02-12-2011, 10:47 AM
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Are you talking about gluing long grain to long grain joints like in gluing a tabletop together? If thatís the case, Iíve never used a router for that and here is why - the fit would depend on the fence, and getting a matching joint would be nightmare. If thatís not exactly the case, what joint are you referring to?

As mentioned, long grain to long grain joints donít need dowels, splines or biscuits for strength. These are used (often in industrial applications) to help align the edges to decrease sanding or planing later, not to add strength, though that is sometimes taught in industrial arts classes. Another factor to consider is that dowels and biscuits will have the grain going in a right or oblique angle compared to the boards they are holding together, and will change dimensions differently than the wood. Bumps in the joint above the dowels can appear years later. If you are joining long boards using a ship-lap joint, unless you are doing it for the appearance (with a space between them for example), or to account for wood movement, you donít need to do all that work. Just glue the boards together without anything.

Finally, are you using half lap joints to glue vertical and horizontal pieces together? If so, the half lap may not be the best choice. When a half lap joint is subjected to any twisting motion (I think a cradle counts), they can pull apart more easily than a mortise and tenon.
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post #7 of 8 Old 02-13-2011, 08:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hawglet View Post
anyone with war stories or praises of a routed glue joint? I'm building a cradle and modified my plans that included ugly laps with a routed glue joint for edge joints. Any advise for strength with this? I would only assume that they would be much stronger than an edge joint using biscuits or dowels, right?
Hi Greg - I think you are asking about the reversible glue joint bit??
Problem I've had is the stock needs to be dead straight and absolutely equal size or you got a lot of sanding. Thickness planer is a big help. I prefer a wedge style tongue and groove. Helps with alignment and provides extra glue surface.
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post #8 of 8 Old 02-14-2011, 11:27 PM Thread Starter
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Correct, after this project I have really decided that I need a planer. Yeah, I got by but those joints didn't line up the greatest. I'm used to exact precsion of a metal shop where a 1/32 might matter an inch once you're done so wood is my challenge I guess. I probably had about 1/16" misalignment on one side so not too bad I suppose but I just like exact. I'm that guy that uses a 32nd scale ruler when setting the fence on the table saw although the blade probably flexes nearly that much anyway.

~Greg
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