Reclaimed Wood Wall Joinery - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 6 Old 10-08-2015, 10:37 PM Thread Starter
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Reclaimed Wood Wall Joinery

Hey guys,



Hey guys,

I am planning on putting up a reclaimed wood accent wall similar to the photos below:




I have all of the lumber, but I am curious about opinions on jointing the pieces. I was thinking about using tongue/groove for the edges and possibly using biscuit joints for the end grain. This would be joined one piece at a time while placing/securing it on the wall.



Do you think it is necessary to joint the pieces?

Are there any good recommendations for an alternative to biscuit jointing the end grain as I don't currently have a biscuit jointer (although a much cheaper alternative is to use a biscuit joint routing bit)?

Is tongue and groove a good idea for the edges?

Thanks
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post #2 of 6 Old 10-09-2015, 12:50 AM
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I'd just use a brad nailer to nail it to the studs.
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post #3 of 6 Old 10-09-2015, 11:06 AM
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I helped a friend with a similar project. I edge jointed, then ripped, then rabbeted both sides to create a ship lap. He just nailed it to the wall and torched it in place. It really looked great.

He did another room before that with open joints that looked bad. You could see the plaster through the joints and he ended up having to fill them with caulk, which wasn't very attractive either.

Another option might be to hang black tar paper first so the joints "disappear", but I think the shiplap will give you the best results. I wouldn't recommend a T&G because it's a finicky joint. If you're lumber is like his, it will be varying thickness and that will make it challenging. Shiplap is pretty forgiving.
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post #4 of 6 Old 10-10-2015, 12:40 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickDIY View Post
I helped a friend with a similar project. I edge jointed, then ripped, then rabbeted both sides to create a ship lap. He just nailed it to the wall and torched it in place. It really looked great.

He did another room before that with open joints that looked bad. You could see the plaster through the joints and he ended up having to fill them with caulk, which wasn't very attractive either.

Another option might be to hang black tar paper first so the joints "disappear", but I think the shiplap will give you the best results. I wouldn't recommend a T&G because it's a finicky joint. If you're lumber is like his, it will be varying thickness and that will make it challenging. Shiplap is pretty forgiving.
Thanks for the response!

I read that many people paintbrush behind wall black or a dark color that way you can't "see" the Wall.

I'll keep your advice in mind about the ship lap.

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post #5 of 6 Old 10-13-2015, 10:09 PM
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this topic is of special interest to me, I plan to build a whole house this way, floors, walls, ceiling, I also plan on covering it on the outside in a similar way, question is how much can I do?

I am not an experienced woodworker, not to say I have no experience fabricating just not with wood, previously looking into it shiplap appeared to be a good midway solution, T&G is a bit too much, none will likely gap, I am curious to see what you end up doing and how you go about it, I have a lot of lumber to mill and joint, not sure how to go about setting up all the machines needed to accomplish this, nor how far to take this, how many processes to put the boards through before they go up
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post #6 of 6 Old 10-14-2015, 07:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hwebb99 View Post
I'd just use a brad nailer to nail it to the studs.
Yes, End jointing is not necessary.

What you do(or do not do) for edge jointing will depend upon what look you want.

Biscuits not needed.

George
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