Rabbet Top of 4x4 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 11-29-2012, 10:01 AM Thread Starter
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Rabbet Top of 4x4

I'm looking to get a clean rabbet cut on the top of a 4x4 to accept a crossing 2x4. I have circular saw, miter saw and jig saw that I can use. Does anyone have any tricks to make sure all the cuts will be flush and perpendicular?

Thanks,

John
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post #2 of 8 Old 11-29-2012, 10:26 AM
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It sounds like you want a half lap joint or lap joint rather than a rabbit or rebate.

Set the circ saw to the correct depth, use a speed sqaure as a guide and cut the two outer lines. Next make random passes inside those lines at the same depth an about 1/2" apart. The remaining wood can be removed easily with a few blows of a hammer and cleaned up with a chisel.

This ain't fine furniture building but a fall back on my construction days. The quality of the end result is dependent upon your attention to detail.

Good luck!
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post #3 of 8 Old 11-29-2012, 10:37 AM Thread Starter
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You are right, I did want a half lap joint. The circular saw will work just fine then. Thanks.
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post #4 of 8 Old 11-29-2012, 10:46 AM
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I would also use a speed square, but make full depth pass for the two cuts. It's a matter of a straight level movement of the saw over the top of the 4x4. That's how I rabbeted the 2x4's for these legs done in a quick backyard project.





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post #5 of 8 Old 11-29-2012, 11:10 AM
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We're saying the same thing, Mike. I guess I wasn't clear. Yes, all passes full depth... or "correct depth"
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post #6 of 8 Old 11-29-2012, 11:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firemedic View Post
We're saying the same thing, Mike. I guess I wasn't clear. Yes, all passes full depth... or "correct depth"
Or maybe half of the full depth.
Or, proportionally the depth to accept a secondary member to complete the joint.
Or, maybe the complimentary depth of the joining members.





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post #7 of 8 Old 11-29-2012, 12:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnnyg24 View Post
I'm looking to get a clean rabbet cut on the top of a 4x4 to accept a crossing 2x4. I have circular saw, miter saw and jig saw that I can use. Does anyone have any tricks to make sure all the cuts will be flush and perpendicular?

Thanks,

John
I would make the shoulder cut first, using a speed square or cross cut guide. I would make the top cut next using a circular saw on a sled with support front and rear to prevent tipping and shifting.
. If you have many to make then a sled is definitely in order.
It should clamp to the side and have the proper fence width for the half lap of a 2 x 4, which would be 1 1 /2".
You want a fool proof jig that once it's located you just run the saw against the fence and it comes out square on both sides.
Then you will need to finish the circular saw cut, which will not be deep enough, about 2" or so with a hand saw to get the 3 1/2" depth.

Or you could just use a hand saw to do the whole process....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #8 of 8 Old 11-29-2012, 01:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post

Or maybe half of the full depth.
Or, proportionally the depth to accept a secondary member to complete the joint.
Or, maybe the complimentary depth of the joining members.




.
I'm thinking more along the lines of:

(2)(the depth of cut) = (3.5" - the desired remaining thickness)(8)(1/4)

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