PVA glue squeezeout make a mess - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 26 Old 12-01-2019, 11:34 AM Thread Starter
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Question PVA glue squeezeout make a mess

PVA (Polyvinylacetate (I think), is the same as Titebond (I think).


I make small boxes with mitred joints on the sides ends and also but joints for the top and bottom. Inevitably there is squeezeout which invades the surrounding wood pieces. It can't be left of course. I use a drinking straw to swallow up most of the surplus then wipe with a wet paper tissue but traces of the glue inevitably remain and alter the appearance of wood stains applied later, or even varnish or French polish.


This must be a common problem. How to solve please?


Thanks.
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post #2 of 26 Old 12-01-2019, 11:57 AM
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Steve - depending on how much woodworking that you do that
ends up being stained, there is one product that "helps" to identify
where any residual glue may be hiding that could ruin your project.
it is a fluorescent glue that glows under a blacklight.
I have never used it as I do not do a lot of stained projects.
I know of a guy on another forum that swears by it as it helps him
turn out a better project and shortens the cleanup time.
the last I checked, it was only available in one gallon containers.
even tho the small hobby bottle is shown on their website, it is not available.
you can decant it into smaller bottles and keep them in the fridge to extend shelf life.
this is your call - as to if it is worth the investment or not.

PVA glue squeezeout make a mess-titebond-fluorescent-glue.jpg
TITEBOND II FLUORESCENT WOOD GLUE

Titebond II Fluorescent can help any woodworker achieve professional-looking results.
It provides a strong initial tack and fast speed of set to reduce clamp time.
It also develops bonds stronger than wood, offers excellent sandability and is unaffected
by finishes. Titebond II Fluorescent contains a dye that, when viewed under a blacklight,
enables woodworkers to inspect the glue line and assist in the cleanup process.
It is ideal for most porous materials, is easy to use and cleans up with water.

disclaimer: I have no personal gain in this product.

.

.

I am a painter: that's what I do, I like to paint things.
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post #3 of 26 Old 12-01-2019, 12:15 PM
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I use a dedicated sharp chisel to shovel under the beads of glue that squeeze out after clamping. The key is to wait until the beads of glue skin over and try not to add to the dilemma by smearing it. It usually skins over in about 20 minutes. any glue that smears into the wood must be sanded away before you apply finish or its permanent. In some cases you can pre finish the wood prior to glue up when practical, but you must be careful not to get finish on the joints you plan to glue.

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post #4 of 26 Old 12-01-2019, 04:21 PM
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Titebond products are available in different sizes. I used the 16 oz. bottles for gluing cork rings for fishing rod grips. Compress and wipe with a wet paper towel and then turn on the lathe. For WWing, use lots of wet rags. I didn't do this and have to sand it out of stair treads. http://http://www.titebond.com/

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post #5 of 26 Old 12-01-2019, 06:30 PM
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Think most of your problem is using the wet rag to clean off the glue. For me, thats always just spread it around, and the extra water dilutes the glue and forces it deeper into the wood. I just let the glue dry, then trim off the excess using a chisel. Never have a problem with stains or finishes that way
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post #6 of 26 Old 12-01-2019, 06:51 PM
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I use masking tape along the edges of corner joints during glue up and clamping.
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post #7 of 26 Old 12-02-2019, 10:09 AM
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I use a wet rag and don't have an issue if follow these rules:


1. Remove the bulk of the glue mechanically I usually use a putty knife.
2. Use a rag, not a paper towel

3. Rinse rag frequently
4. Repeat 2-3 times
5. Finish with a dry rag.

The problem with letting the glue dry is glue that has dried in the pores. Ultimately using the right amount of glue is the key.
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Last edited by DrRobert; 12-02-2019 at 10:18 AM.
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post #8 of 26 Old 12-02-2019, 12:00 PM
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I have read many posts where people say to wait the perfect amount of time, then carefully scrape away the soft-dried glue squeeze-out. Like magic, it comes off clean, and leaves nothing on or in the wood! I keep trying it, but have not had good luck with it:

* Most often, I forget, and the glue is dried hard.
* Sometimes I remember, but it is difficult to get the timing right. So far, the glue feels right, but underneath the rubbery skin is wet glue.

-> Does anyone have any hints about to get a perfectly peeling glue bead using the wait-and-scrape method??

(I have used wet paper towels and rags, but worry that it makes a bigger mess of dilute glue. If you use enough water, it may get into the joint and weaken it, or it can raise the grain in the wood around the joint.)

Related, but off topic:

Note to Self: Buy a Cheap Kitchen Timer for the Shop

Every time I see one of these threads, I remind myself to buy a cheap kitchen timer to keep in the shop. All too often, I lose track of time while I am working, and the time is long since gone when I should have:

* Scraped the squeeze out glue beads at the perfect point of soft/hard easy removal.
* Wiped off the finish or buffed the finish or whatever was needed for the finish.
* Gone inside when dinner is hot and fresh. :-(
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post #9 of 26 Old 12-02-2019, 01:50 PM
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use less glue

when gluing up boards i just scrape off any squeeze out when dry
wiping with wet rag just spreads the problem when finishing

on finer joints like your boxes... use less glue or no glue
nails or pins will hold it together
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post #10 of 26 Old 12-02-2019, 02:25 PM
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If the glue sets, it is almost impossible to remove from the grain, unless you do a lot of sanding. AMHIK.
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post #11 of 26 Old 12-02-2019, 09:04 PM
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In my boxes, I use blue painters tape. I install the tape when the box is still apart. It does take some time, but if done right you will not have glue stains.
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post #12 of 26 Old 12-03-2019, 08:57 AM Thread Starter
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I will go with tape

Quote:
Originally Posted by hawkeye10 View Post
In my boxes, I use blue painters tape. I install the tape when the box is still apart. It does take some time, but if done right you will not have glue stains.
Kerrys also recomended this so I will go along with the taped method. I will experiment by taping across the inside joint corner before cutting the mitres. With luck, the remaining tape will still cover the troublesome area accurately and keep the glue off the wood before peeling the tape off with its soft squeezeout. If not I will tape the inside (both) of the already mitred joint hard up to the internal corner in the hope that still soft squeezeout will come cleanly away when removing the tape.

The problem of using a chisel is in getting access to the inside of a box.
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post #13 of 26 Old 12-03-2019, 10:14 AM
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I think ultimately... careful placement when gluing is key. Personally, I try to place the glue sparingly...to prevent squeeze out...or try to have the squeeze out in an area that can be scraped/sanded without effecting the outcome. On small detailed items, I often use nail files...they have worked well for me. As a final check before staining/finishing, the wood can be wetted with Denatured Alcohol or Mineral Spirits to make the glue still remaining stand out. I shutter when I watch YouTube/Tv shows...where they spooge glue out of a joint, knowing it causes this very problem.

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post #14 of 26 Old 12-09-2019, 04:22 PM Thread Starter
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Squeezout problem solved!

Quote:
Originally Posted by stevekir View Post
Kerrys also recomended this so I will go along with the taped method. I will experiment by taping across the inside joint corner before cutting the mitres. With luck, the remaining tape will still cover the troublesome area accurately and keep the glue off the wood before peeling the tape off with its soft squeezeout. If not I will tape the inside (both) of the already mitred joint hard up to the internal corner in the hope that still soft squeezeout will come cleanly away when removing the tape.

The problem of using a chisel is in getting access to the inside of a box.
I can report that I have tried the second method ("...tape the inside (both) of the already mitred joint hard up to the internal corner...") and it works perfectly. I waited for a few minutes for the squeezeout (which went on to the tape only of course) had stiffened slightly. No trace of glue went on to the wood. I also tried the first method with equal success (although more tape is needed). Squeezout problem solved!
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post #15 of 26 Old 06-11-2020, 07:56 AM
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I use a flat head screw driver with a rag on the tip. Just change the rag position after each corner is cleaned. Works great.
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post #16 of 26 Old 06-11-2020, 09:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DrRobert View Post
I use a wet rag and don't have an issue if follow these rules:


1. Remove the bulk of the glue mechanically I usually use a putty knife.
2. Use a rag, not a paper towel

3. Rinse rag frequently
4. Repeat 2-3 times
5. Finish with a dry rag.

The problem with letting the glue dry is glue that has dried in the pores. Ultimately using the right amount of glue is the key.
Agree.....nothing fancy to it...
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post #17 of 26 Old 06-12-2020, 09:10 AM Thread Starter
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I am now doing what Rebelwork suggests.
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post #18 of 26 Old 06-12-2020, 11:42 AM
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immediate 'scraping off' plus liberal water wash plus dry-with-a-towel works best for me.
my scraper of choice is a sharp chisel...at a high angle . . . immediate scrape and immediate wash plus dry.
gets tricky gluing lots of joint length because 'time flies'

in addition to the glow-in-the-dark glue - after 'all is dry' a wipe down with denatured alcohol reveals spot/flaws/places you missed - on sanding & gluing....
very helpful, works best on darker woods - requires good light and careful examination on light woods.
I go through a fair amount of denatured alcohol - nothing unmakes my day more than finding a spot I missed after/during staining/finishing.

also of much usefulness - applying the glue with "something" other than the bottle nozzle, to more carefully control the amount and placement.
I use wooden skewers (cheap at the grocery store, snip off a used end=fresh dabber...) also popsicle sticks are great for cheap spreaders dabbers.

I use Scott shop towels - ie paper - but it is important to not just smear the glue around - multiple fresh rags, never soaked&rinsed&saturated&reused...
fresh towel, fresh water on every "pass" - when the ketchup bottle is empty, they make a good bench "water dispenser"

if you're cheap like me, rinse & hang them up to dry and reuse _after_ they are dry. if they're too stiff after drying, toss them.
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post #19 of 26 Old 06-12-2020, 01:35 PM
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I wish I could be better at it. Despite years of practice and trying everything, I still have squeezout issues. I have tried wet rags, scraping, and tape:

* Wet rags:
Can make matters worse by spreading watered-down glue over a wider surface. If it penetrates the joint, it may weaken it. It also raises the grain. This is what I do now anyway, and try to learn from my mistakes. After years, perhaps I am untrainable for this method.

* Scraping before fully cured:
Scraping too soon may pop the skin and spread more glue around. Scraping before it is cured is hard to get the timing just right, and I added a magnetic kitchen timer to my shop to remind me. Furthermore, different glue-ups seem to need different times. It seems that there is no one timing that is "right."

* Scraping (or sanding) after fully cured:
Time consuming and likely to tear the wood or cause other issues, and leaves some behind anyway.

* Tape:
I used the 3M blue painters tape on baltic birch scrap to try it out. I let it cure too much. The glue soaked through and glued the tape to the wood, making things worse. Would cellophane tape, Scotch magic tape, or another plastic tape work better?

* Getting the amount of glue right every time:
Maybe in heaven.

I use the Rockler silicone glue trays, brushes, and spreaders. I like them very much for wood glue. The glue just peels off if you have time to let it dry, otherwise you can wash it off. Sure, you can use disposable flux brushes or sticks or your finger (and I do on occasion), but I like how they leave the right "glue ridges." They just work for me:
https://www.rockler.com/rockler-3-pi...pplication-kit
For drill holes and my spouse's small scroll saw projects:
https://www.rockler.com/rockler-sili...e-brush-2-pack
https://www.rockler.com/rockler-sili...glue-brush-set

I thought they were exclusive to Rockler, but I also found this, available from Peachtree and Amazon:
https://www.ptreeusa.com/gluing_sili_products.html
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post #20 of 26 Old 06-12-2020, 05:40 PM
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OK, I'm thinking box joints. I'm thinking tape. I'm thinking reality.

Only on the inside of the box is the problem. Before assembly I'll put a strip of blue painter's tape covering the pins of the box joint and on into the inside of the project. I roll it with a wallpaper roller to insure that the tape is stuck. I'll clamp a straight edge across the inside exactly even with the depth of the joint. Using a single edge razor blade I'll score the tape deeply. Then I'll remove the tape from the pins.

After the glue has significantly dried (30 minutes or so) I'll peel the remaining tape from the joint.

The outside of the joint will require sanding but with a modern ROS that is a piece of cake.

Rich
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