Proper use of jointer - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 Old 01-11-2011, 04:28 PM Thread Starter
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Question Proper use of jointer

I have a 6" Grizzly jointer I am trying to learn to use. I had the blades sharpened and set them in place according to manual. I am starting with a thin cut around 1/32. After a few passes the board cuts the leading edge adequately but not the trailing edge. I end up with a tapered edge. When I swap ends to try to even up the board I end up with a high spot in the center. I've tried to change my point of pressure but to no avail. Any suggestions? Is it me? the Jointer, pressure points or what? Thanks for your help
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post #2 of 11 Old 01-11-2011, 04:39 PM
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I'm not sure what you mean by "tapered edge" but I've experienced convex (not strait) edges. That's caused by the outfeed table not being level with the knives. Get a good straitedge and adjust the outfeed table to the same height as the knives at their highest point. Try another test. If that doesn't work, maybe another fellow woodworker has the answer.
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post #3 of 11 Old 01-11-2011, 04:50 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you for your reply. When I installed the blades they were at the same ht as outfeed table. I will check them again, but now you have me wondering if the outfeed table could be sloped slightly up or down?
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post #4 of 11 Old 01-11-2011, 05:18 PM
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Would a flatness check with some "winding sticks" help?

http://www.popularwoodworking.com/ar...our_Workbench/

http://amercanwoodworker.com/blogs/tips/archive/2009/09/09/better-winding-sticks.aspx

Last edited by SteveEl; 01-11-2011 at 05:28 PM.
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post #5 of 11 Old 01-11-2011, 06:00 PM
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Yes it is possible

Quote:
Originally Posted by sawdustman View Post
Thank you for your reply. When I installed the blades they were at the same ht as outfeed table. I will check them again, but now you have me wondering if the outfeed table could be sloped slightly up or down?
It's not real likely, but possible.
You will need to check that by using a 48" level or other known straight edge run across the outfeed, the blades and infeed table all adjusted to the same height. There should be no daylight light showing under it any location. If so, there are two possibilites, one table is sloped front to back or one table is twisted side to side. In either case shims will be needed to fix the issue.
http://www.newwoodworker.com/jntrprobfxs.html
The other issue is one of technique.
I use my jointer much like a hand plane to start off.
I remove "offensive" material I determine by sighting the board and rocking it on a known flat surface to determine where the material needs to be removed and mark it with chalk or a pencil.
After removing most or all of the "offensive" material, I start with a firm pressure down and forward on the infeed table until there is enough stock to rest securely on the outfeed and then continue forward and downward concentrating pressure on the outfeed table. Taking modest cuts no more than 1/16" soon the sound of the cutter is smooth and even across the entire length of the board.
If you start with a board that has a lot of warp and attempt to flatten it out in just a few deep passes, it will not result in the surface being flat as a rule. JMO bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 01-11-2011 at 06:02 PM.
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post #6 of 11 Old 01-11-2011, 07:04 PM Thread Starter
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Thank you kindly for your reply. I went to the Newwoodworker.com link and found all the info I need to check the setup and some good suggestions on technique. Quite a website.
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post #7 of 11 Old 01-11-2011, 11:53 PM
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I also have a 6" Grizzly jointer. When I first started using it I had a "tapered" end. I found my outfeed table was too low. This was easily corrected with a 48" straight edge. Hope you fix the issue.
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post #8 of 11 Old 01-12-2011, 01:16 AM
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The Wood Whisperer podcast has a great video on Jointer setup and use. http://thewoodwhisperer.com/episode-...inters-jumpin/

----------------------------
Russ
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post #9 of 11 Old 01-12-2011, 02:35 AM
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Your not passing the board over the jointer multiple times in an attempt to get it to a specific thickness -- like a planer would do -- are you?

Gakkuri
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post #10 of 11 Old 01-12-2011, 09:39 AM Thread Starter
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Lightbulb Thanks

After reading the newwoodworker.com articles, I rechecked my settings. The tables appear true and parallel. The fence needed to be squared but I don't think that was the problem. The outfeed table may be a hair to high. To install the newly sharpened blades to a uniform heighth, I used a 36" steel straight edge off the outfeed table. With the table locked into position, I set each blade, front and back, so the high point barely scraped the straight edge. Most articles reccommend using a fancy dial callipers. Maybe I should make the investment, but it seems like a lot for a hobby woodworker; maybe more than I paid for the jointer.

Based on the articles, I also reduced my feed rate considerably. This seemed to help a lot. Previously my feed rate approximated the feedrate I use on my table saw. I also tried to put more pressure on the outfeed table. Finally, I have decided to change the design of my project to reduce the length of the boards. Trying to joint a bowed 8' 1 x 4 is more than I can handle. The other option would be to go to a hand plane. Who ever thought using a jointer would be so hard?

Anyway thanks again for your comments. This is a great website, especially for those of us without local help. I'll sleep better tonight.

Pete the Sawdustman
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post #11 of 11 Old 01-12-2011, 09:47 AM
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Another thought

I didn't mention flipping the board end for end in the initial phase of flattening, removing material from either end, bowed face down. like this sad face, concave face down.
Not like this happy face, convex side down.
As you remove material from each end the board becomes closer to flat across the entire length. That's how I do it.
You don't have to make passes that run the whole length at once. Just joint in from either end as much as needed by sighting it. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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