plank tabletop bowing?? - Page 2 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #21 of 30 Old 03-31-2014, 03:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
Quit buying your lumber at Home Depot.
Calling Home Depot the K-Mart of lumber would be a compliment.
I'm not a fan of home depot's lumber either- but I support people's wishes to operate inside a budget. That table would have cost a small fortune if made of walnut (but man that would have been nice!).
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post #22 of 30 Old 03-31-2014, 04:46 AM
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Originally Posted by fish02906 View Post
Where do you recommend i buy wood for my little home projects? recall i'm not a "pro"...i mostly just do this for my own entertainment. that dining table is the only "furniture" i've ever put together.
Buy you lumber just about anywhere except Home Depot or some discount lumber place.
Lowes is not that great either but it is lots better than Home Depot.

BTW, beautiful table.

Tony B Retired woodworker, among other things.


"Strive for excellence and settle for completion" Tony B
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post #23 of 30 Old 04-05-2014, 10:39 AM
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I have no financial interest in any lumber store.
Home Depot is likely no worse than any other. The issue is how tight(small radius) the growth rings are when you look at the end of the boards.
They tend to use small trees to make the 2x4s so they warp a lot more.
Construction lumber is usually only dried to 19% or so to get rid of the free water and make them lighter for shipping and avoid rot. They have a lot of drying and deformation to do.
If you are building furniture it's best to stick to the 2x10s or wider. That's where they use the larger trees. Even then you have to check the ends and avoid tight rings.
Sometimes you can get board through the middle of the tree and after cutting out the pith section, you have quarter cut wood that is the most stable.
Most stores have a separate area with the best, often clear, wood that is intended for trim work. You pay a premium for the better wood.
Hardwood stores usually have a bit of softwood like pine that is from larger trees and intended for finished work.
If you are going to invest your time, it's worth investing time to pick and buy good material.
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post #24 of 30 Old 04-05-2014, 05:19 PM
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For any one interested, Home Depot, Lowes, Sutherlands, McCoy's, Menards, you name it mom and pop lumber yards get their lumber from the same suppliers. The trucks line up at the mill and load the stuff out of the same piles for every store. It's the same for sheetrock( gypsum), it comes from all over the U.S., Canada, and imported. I know this for a fact, I hauled this crap for years. So it does not matter where you buy the lumber, it all comes from the same places. The fuel you put in your car or truck is the same way, I could go on and on, it makes no difference, just what makes YOU feel warm and fuzzy inside.
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post #25 of 30 Old 04-05-2014, 05:28 PM
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It may come from the same mills or factory, that doesn't mean it's the same quality product. Menards regularly down specs products to be the lowest price.

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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post #26 of 30 Old 04-05-2014, 05:48 PM
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I suspect that it's more that the big boxes don't really care what quality they get. They're trying to sell materials for carpentry, not for fine furniture. Cedar with knots in it is good enough for a deck, and mis-colored pine with lots of pitch is entirely adequate for studs. They carry some hardwoods, yes, but they mostly intend them for trim, so they don't really need the high quality stuff.

And honestly, I'm OK with that. If I'm framing out a new closet, I don't really want to pay for quartersawn lumber, I just want studs that are straight enough to work, and I can get that at Home Depot.
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post #27 of 30 Old 04-05-2014, 07:59 PM
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My pointy is.....it's ALL the same, one truck loads mom and pop load, next truck loads lowes load, IT'S ALL FROM THE SAME PILE. The only difference is the grade they order, if mom and pop order #2 or better 2x's as does lowes.....IT'S ALL THE SAME. Been there, done it... Like I said if it makes you feel warm and fuzzy paying mom and pop more for the same stuff, go for it, but don't make others think it's all bad unless it comes from mom and pop lumberyard. I can drive 35 miles and get lumber 1/4 cheaper than here in town, drive 75 miles get it half price from the big boys, and wouldn't you know, they all use the same supplier and grades are the same. ......OK, I'm done......
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post #28 of 30 Old 04-05-2014, 09:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dustmagnet
My pointy is.....it's ALL the same, one truck loads mom and pop load, next truck loads lowes load, IT'S ALL FROM THE SAME PILE. The only difference is the grade they order, if mom and pop order #2 or better 2x's as does lowes.....IT'S ALL THE SAME. Been there, done it... Like I said if it makes you feel warm and fuzzy paying mom and pop more for the same stuff, go for it, but don't make others think it's all bad unless it comes from mom and pop lumberyard. I can drive 35 miles and get lumber 1/4 cheaper than here in town, drive 75 miles get it half price from the big boys, and wouldn't you know, they all use the same supplier and grades are the same. ......OK, I'm done......
You're missing the point. It's not about where you buy it, it's about what you're buying. If you're buying crap #2 construction lumber and trying to turn it into furniture, odds are the same result will be experienced no matter where it was purchased.

Like Midland Bob said above, if you've got no choice but to purchase construction grade lumber, purchase 2 x 12's and rip/resaw it into the sizes you need. Best bet is to dig thru the 2x12x16' pile and pluck out the straight-ish ones, they'll most likely be the most stable as they had to be cut from large, straight logs.
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post #29 of 30 Old 04-08-2014, 05:02 AM
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I agree that it is the growth rings, especially since the boards in this case have such a tight pattern. Uneven finish will definitely cause bowing, but in this case it should be bowed the other way--with the cup down. Moisture loss causes fibers to shrink, so the bottom should be shrinking, but it's not because the growth rings are straightening.
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post #30 of 30 Old 04-12-2014, 11:32 PM
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If you read carefully, I don't believe I said boards cup "BECAUSE of straightening of the growth rings". Most species of wood shrink almost twice as much tangentially as they do radially, the board with a curve in the growth rings will warp or cup in a manner that causes the growth rings as viewed from the end to straighten as It dries.
It's a convenient "rule" to predict warping. I'm not sure why you take exception.?
Wood can also move or warp in other ways due to the uneven shrinkage of different parts of the log.
Wood can warp in a spiral or along the longitudinal axis if the tree grew with different densities or fibre orientation.
Wood grown on an angle(side of hill or in a fence row) rather than straight up, can move in uneven and sometimes frustrating ways when cut and dried. The main drying issues are still those caused by the difference in the shrinkage tangential vs radial to the log.
This understanding is close to vital for building with wood.
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