planing endgrain - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 17 Old 09-27-2011, 02:53 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 12
View Mitchman's Photo Album My Photos
planing endgrain

I am making a cutting board out of hard maple. I start with 1 3/4" stock and crosscut it into 3/4" strips. I then turn the strips 90 degrees and glue up a blank panel so that the surface of the panel is all endgrain. My question is once the glue dries can I run the panel thru a planer and get a smooth surface? If it sounds like I am a rookie it's only because I am.

Mitchman
Mitchman is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 Old 09-27-2011, 03:22 PM
Senior Member
 
slicksqueegie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Warren, MI
Posts: 572
View slicksqueegie's Photo Album My Photos
I doubt that would work out well.
Use a belt sander.

Anybody can become a woodworker, but only a Craftsmen can hide his mistakes!

Last edited by slicksqueegie; 09-27-2011 at 03:28 PM.
slicksqueegie is offline  
post #3 of 17 Old 09-27-2011, 03:46 PM
Hungry like a Hippo
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Louisville
Posts: 349
View cellophane's Photo Album My Photos
A low-angle jack / jointer plane would work as well - just make sure your blade is wicked sharp. A block plane could work but with a large surface area it will follow changes in the wood more than a larger plane.
cellophane is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 17 Old 09-27-2011, 03:51 PM
Member
 
kpo101's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: South Louisiana
Posts: 72
View kpo101's Photo Album My Photos
The first time i tried it in the planer it was a night-mare, it chatter chopped the board so bad I had to can it. I only use and wide belt sander now with my end-grain bds (which belongs to a friend cause I can't afford one right now). I have heard of people doing it in a planner, but it just didn't work for me.
kpo101 is offline  
post #5 of 17 Old 09-27-2011, 05:29 PM
No Longer Here
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 312
View johnray's Photo Album My Photos
Use a belt if you have one, or low ange plane.
johnray is offline  
post #6 of 17 Old 10-06-2011, 06:35 PM
woodchuckswood.biz
 
Chancewoodchuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Lacygne kansas
Posts: 29
View Chancewoodchuck's Photo Album My Photos
end grain

I start by gluing the 1 3/4 pcs into a panel then sanding them with wide belt, then cutting the 3/4 and regluing.
Chancewoodchuck is offline  
post #7 of 17 Old 11-04-2011, 08:04 PM
WHWoodworking
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: North Idaho
Posts: 57
View WHWoodworking's Photo Album My Photos
Send a message via Skype™ to WHWoodworking
I see a planer as not being an option. Call around to any millwork shops in the area and see if they'll rent you time on an overhead sander. I've had them sand large table tops for me. Otherwise, what others have said, use a belt sander. End grain is a real biatch. :)
WHWoodworking is offline  
post #8 of 17 Old 11-04-2011, 10:19 PM
"Lets make some sawdust!"
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 47
View Artisan1993's Photo Album My Photos
Nooooooo, as everyone said it will not end well for the cutting board and possibly not the machine either, same thing for edge jointers. The ideal machine for this is something that I don't actually know the name of, it is like a planer but instead of a blade its a large sanding belt. Chances are you don't have access to one of these so you'll have to belt sand it preferably with a very strong sander otherwise it will take a while (know from experience.) Only thing with this is that one: it all around sucks and 2: you have to keep the sander perfectly flat and sand everywhere evenly.

P.S. bosch makes a monster of a belt sander that rips through hardwood like wet cardboard and would be great for something like this, heres a pic of it

I would be a simple man, but that would be too simple
Artisan1993 is offline  
post #9 of 17 Old 11-05-2011, 12:34 AM
WHWoodworking
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: North Idaho
Posts: 57
View WHWoodworking's Photo Album My Photos
Send a message via Skype™ to WHWoodworking
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan1993 View Post
The ideal machine for this is something that I don't actually know the name of, it is like a planer but instead of a blade its a large sanding belt.
In my post right before yours, I referred to the machine you're talking about. Overhead sander.
WHWoodworking is offline  
post #10 of 17 Old 11-05-2011, 09:37 AM
John
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: La Crosse, Kansas
Posts: 3,028
View jschaben's Photo Album My Photos
Router with a dado cleanout bit will work. Just need to build a planning jig for it
Router skiis will also work.

John

If I strive for perfection, I can generally achieve good'nuff, If I strive for good'nuff, I generally achieve firewood
jschaben is offline  
post #11 of 17 Old 11-05-2011, 10:25 AM
SS user
 
Gene Howe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Snowflake, AZ
Posts: 2,690
View Gene Howe's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by jschaben View Post
Router with a dado cleanout bit will work. Just need to build a planning jig for it
Router skiis will also work.
+1
Simple, fast and clean. Plus, with the skis, it can be used for a lot of other tasks as well.
Here is an excellent tutorial.

For another type of router planer.

Gene
The Patriot Woodworker

'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

Last edited by Gene Howe; 11-05-2011 at 10:28 AM.
Gene Howe is offline  
post #12 of 17 Old 11-05-2011, 05:01 PM
woodchuckswood.biz
 
Chancewoodchuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Lacygne kansas
Posts: 29
View Chancewoodchuck's Photo Album My Photos
widebelt sander/abrasive planer

Widebelt sander or abasive planer is what I would use, one of these if possible to use will give the best finish, if not the old belt sander will do the trick although like everyone says very time consuming and the importance of keeping the sander flat and sanding in a even pattern can't be overstated.
Chancewoodchuck is offline  
post #13 of 17 Old 11-05-2011, 06:36 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 2,304
View TomC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by jschaben
Router with a dado cleanout bit will work. Just need to build a planning jig for it
Router skiis will also work.
What is a dado clean out bit?
Tom
TomC is offline  
post #14 of 17 Old 11-06-2011, 10:27 AM
SS user
 
Gene Howe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Snowflake, AZ
Posts: 2,690
View Gene Howe's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomC View Post
What is a dado clean out bit?
Tom
Tom, here is one. Dado Clean out

Here is another type that will work as well.
Plunge Bits

Gene
The Patriot Woodworker

'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton
Gene Howe is offline  
post #15 of 17 Old 11-06-2011, 01:51 PM
No Longer Here
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 312
View johnray's Photo Album My Photos
Please post a pic of router skiis. Thats a new one on this old dog.
johnray is offline  
post #16 of 17 Old 11-06-2011, 03:02 PM
SS user
 
Gene Howe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Snowflake, AZ
Posts: 2,690
View Gene Howe's Photo Album My Photos
I don't have any pics of my skis and can't get any soon. But, here is one of the pictures from the link named "Tutorial" in my previous post.
Follow that link for a great explanation of all that can be done with skis and sleds. The author (Harry Sinclair) is a wonderful teacher.
I'm an old dog, too and love new tricks.

planing endgrain-making-skis8.jpg

Gene
The Patriot Woodworker

'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

Last edited by Gene Howe; 11-06-2011 at 03:04 PM.
Gene Howe is offline  
post #17 of 17 Old 11-07-2011, 12:21 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: NW Pa
Posts: 3,009
View TimPa's Photo Album My Photos
yes, we plane our end grain cutting boards.

1. our planer is a spiral head, i would not suggest it with a straight blade planer. 2. slow feed rate 3. you have to support the back or it will continue to tear out. then we sand.
TimPa is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Spare Minutes = Endgrain Cutting Board CAD Capacity Workstation Project Showcase 25 07-15-2011 07:16 AM
school me on endgrain cutting boards tito5 General Woodworking Discussion 9 05-19-2011 11:42 AM
Endgrain chopping block sadams General Woodworking Discussion 2 11-18-2009 03:11 PM
question on endgrain? jeepturner Woodturning 9 04-05-2009 08:00 PM
Sealing endgrain on a log don716 Woodturning 13 09-29-2008 07:35 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome