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post #21 of 35 Old 10-09-2012, 08:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
There are several ways to set and check the height of the knives. I use a straight block with a mark. I rest the block on the outfeed table and rotate the knives forward as if they were cutting. This will propel the block forward and by adjusting the height on each side and each kive so the block moves the sawe amount no matter where you put it on the table or which knife you use. I try to achieve about 1/16" of forward travel.
If the knives are set to move the block, sounds like they are set higher than the outfeed table, not flush.




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post #22 of 35 Old 10-09-2012, 08:42 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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Yup

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Originally Posted by cabinetman View Post
If the knives are set to move the block, sounds like they are set higher than the outfeed table, not flush.




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about .002 if you watched the video... pretty close for most applications. With an adjustable out feed table you can zero it out. With a fixed outfeed table that's as close as I need. BTW, I have 4 jointers with adjustable tables and 1 with a fixed or non-adjustable outfeed table so it's not really a problem for me.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #23 of 35 Old 10-09-2012, 09:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
about .002 if you watched the video... pretty close for most applications. With an adjustable out feed table you can zero it out. With a fixed outfeed table that's as close as I need. BTW, I have 4 jointers with adjustable tables and 1 with a fixed or non-adjustable outfeed table so it's not really a problem for me.
It wouldn't matter if you had a dozen jointers, if the knives are set too high. With offering an adjustment method for those with one jointer, it's adjusting the knives to be flush with the outfeed table.





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post #24 of 35 Old 10-09-2012, 09:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cabinetman

It wouldn't matter if you had a dozen jointers, if the knives are set too high. With offering an adjustment method for those with one jointer, it's adjusting the knives to be flush with the outfeed table.




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Agreed. I first set my infeed table to zero, then adjust the outfeed table so they are dead nuts flat. Then drop the infeed table away to access the cutter head, and set the knives flush with the outfeed table. I use a steel straight edge for the whole operation.
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post #25 of 35 Old 10-09-2012, 09:42 PM
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Agreed

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Originally Posted by BZawat View Post
Agreed. I first set my infeed table to zero, then adjust the outfeed table so they are dead nuts flat. Then drop the infeed table away to access the cutter head, and set the knives flush with the outfeed table. I use a steel straight edge for the whole operation.
What would you do with a non-adjustable outfeed table like I referred to? Flush is ideal,...002 is very close...goodnnuff for me. How about you? Would your straight edge still work or would you need to get the micrometer gauge...just askin'

http://www.amazon.com/Oneway-2289-Multi-Gauge/dp/B0002SA98I/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1349833860&sr=8-1&keywords=oneway+multi+gauge

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 10-09-2012 at 09:51 PM.
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post #26 of 35 Old 10-09-2012, 10:18 PM
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Yeah. I only zero the outfeed table beforehand as insurance against it having moved from zero since last fine tuning. With a fixed outfeed table it actually makes the job a bit easier, fewer variables to account for.
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post #27 of 35 Old 10-10-2012, 07:14 AM
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I use a Magna-Set when I install my jointer blades. I have had mine for a number of years and does the job well. This jig uses magnets to hold up the blade while you tighten the gibs. It only takes 10 or 15 minutes to set blades. The nice thing about it is it require no swearing at all.
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post #28 of 35 Old 10-11-2012, 04:15 AM
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See? What did I tell you? The people on this forum are a Godsend and they know *a lot*.
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post #29 of 35 Old 10-11-2012, 06:56 PM
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When I first saw this topic I thought this is what I need for wide boards, now that I see that it’s turned into a jointer alignment topic, I’m disappointed.
I have a 6” jointer and I love it for pieces up to 8”, but I just haven’t mastered it for 12” boards, because I still have to run it through the planer. I guess I just need more practice.

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Iím a die hard DIY guy. Donít tell me to hire someone for what I can do myself.
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post #30 of 35 Old 10-15-2012, 11:03 PM
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For what it's worth, I have a 10-1/4 inch Austrian jointer in use for over 20 years. It uses a small aluminum block like Wood and things uses. The block moves about 1/4 inch with the right set. It's checked on both sides. This probably does mean the out feed is a few thousands below the top blade arc. It des a good job. Wood does compress a bit before it gets cut. The small planer marks show the top of the arc. When you sand or hand plane away the planer marks you are planing away these small valleys due to cut and compression. They telegraph thru on finishing due to the wood compression if they are not removed.
A planer sled to flatten boards in a thickness planer is fraught with limitations.if it was rigid and the board clamped rigidly it would work. Lots of ifs. Difficult with spirals etc.
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post #31 of 35 Old 12-14-2012, 01:45 AM
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Wow, I would just use a test indicator and a mag base and get the knives within .0002", guessing off of friction on a block could be .002-.005 off, and when you make 5 passes on a board it's now off .010-.025.... You can buy cheap test indicators and mag bases for them on eBay. But then again I'm a machinist and that's how I would do it, but I regularly work with parts with a tolerance of +/-.0001" and being off .005" is absolutely unheard of.....
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post #32 of 35 Old 12-14-2012, 01:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BZawat View Post
Agreed. I first set my infeed table to zero, then adjust the outfeed table so they are dead nuts flat. Then drop the infeed table away to access the cutter head, and set the knives flush with the outfeed table. I use a steel straight edge for the whole operation.
Using a steal straight edge would be way off as well, unless it has a ground edge and was checked for burrs or dings with a hone, one teeny tiny ding can cause a high spot in the steel rule and throw you way off.. Even the stamped graduation lines in the blade cause high spots. Only straight piece of steel I would trust would be either a precision machinist square or a part I just ground flat on a surface grinder, but even then going off of friction isn't even close.
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post #33 of 35 Old 12-15-2012, 05:04 PM
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Sorry for going off-topic, but.......these above 2 posts have me wondering. What is a reasonable tolerance for woodworking? I say one ten-thousandth is going WAY too far, and basically unattainable with the machines we're talking about. Generally, if I can get within .005", I'm plenty satisfied. I think we have to keep in mind that wood is a natural material, and prone to movement, in even just a few hours. It has flaws, internal stresses, ect.
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post #34 of 35 Old 12-15-2012, 06:08 PM
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On other things wood related. 005" is plenty good enough but when its a jointer its not close enough, if your blades were off. 005" every time you take a pass your board gets further and further from straight, most professional woodworkers are shooting for.perfection, and taking 4 or 5 passes on the jointer with it being off that far makes your board way too far off
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post #35 of 35 Old 12-29-2012, 09:06 PM
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If your going to continue building furniture, get a jointer 8" minimum it will save you a lot of headaches over the years. If you can get carbide knives or a segmented cutter head.
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