One half inch stock! - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 12-23-2014, 05:32 PM Thread Starter
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One half inch stock!

Just wondering what or how you guys create thinner than normal stock. I have a project I would like to build this coming year (charging station).

I am looking for suggestions on how to come up with 1/2 inch stock. I have a band saw and a resaw blade, but haven't installed it or cut anything resaw fashion.

I can buy any kind of wood in rough, so what would you suggest - 5/4 or 6/4 rough?

This won't be a big project so it should be a good chance to practice resawing. My saw is the 14 inch Grizzly and I have a 1/2 inch Olsen blade to work with. Currently the saw has a 3/16 6ti blade on it I use to cut out curvy stuff. :-)

I have a jointer and planer and drum sander so I can wind up with 1/2 inch or even 5/8 inch stock one way or the other. I would like to minimize the waste.

Your thoughts appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
Mike
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post #2 of 12 Old 12-23-2014, 05:47 PM
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pretty simple. Think we can say youd get 1 peice from 4/4, 2 from 6/4 and 3 from 8/4.

Depending what the prices are, and what value you place on your time as well as the use of your equipment/sharpening blades. Determine if the savings (if it exists) is worth the time of resawing.

Im not sure that the 6/4 and 8/4 wont be more than 2-3x as much as 4x4... only because the value of thicker wood (and the area of the tree that they can harvest thicker planks from) is probably greater than the cost for them to make the extra cuts.

In which case Id load up on 4/4. consider making the project 3/4" (because why not?) or throw it through the planer.
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post #3 of 12 Old 12-23-2014, 05:50 PM
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If it were me I would just surface 3/4" lumber down to 1/2" rather than spending the time to resaw rough lumber. Probably you would have to face it on a jointer first before resawing it. 6/4 would yield better wood for 1/2" finished. It would leave enough for surfacing after you resawed it.
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post #4 of 12 Old 12-23-2014, 08:56 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks fellas. I am going to build an end table that will fit in the corner between our couch and love seat. The couch is against one wall and the love seat forms part of the walkway to the adjoining hall. A 24 x 30 inch end table will fill most of that area. Right now, we have an end table and a folding TV tray in that spot.

So, along with that end table, I am going to build something to sit on top of it against the wall that will house a power strip with USB ports. It will provide a resting point for charging cell phones, games, etc. Every time the grandkids come over, they have to recharge their stuff! The love seat is my spot and I keep a laptop at the ready.

So, I was thinking I would resaw the rough lumber, which won't be a lot, and use it to make the charging station. Time isn't a factor.

I guess I was thinking I would pass both sides across the jointer, then resaw by cutting it in half. I could then plane it down to make the half inch thickness.

I have planed 4/4 stuff to 5/8 inch and that makes a lot of shavings that are wasted. They wind up in the landfill.

Next trip to the lumber yard, I will check out the 6/4 stuff. I haven't decided what to use yet.

Thankfully, I don't have any pressing projects. Our kitchen remodel is complete, and I have just about finished the baby changing station for my daughter. She delivered a healthy baby boy yesterday - 8# 3 oz. I should delivery the changing table this coming weekend just in time to put it to good use.

Here is a sneak peek at the baby changing station. I still have 4 drawers to build. The drawer stock is ready to go.
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Last edited by MT Stringer; 12-23-2014 at 08:58 PM. Reason: typos
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post #5 of 12 Old 12-23-2014, 09:41 PM
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If I'm taking 1/8" or more off, in most every instance I resaw. Then I keep the thinner stock, sometimes as veneer, and use it on future projects. I use it for shims, backing to make other stock thicker, sometimes for inlay/Marquetry/Intarsia/banding, etc. About the only time I plane or sand down to thinner stock is when I only need 1/16" or less removed.

But then my approach is that I don't have any scraps. I only have smaller and smaller stock that will one day be used in a project.

Nice looking piece of furniture, MT!

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post #6 of 12 Old 12-23-2014, 09:53 PM
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I always surface it first

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
If it were me I would just surface 3/4" lumber down to 1/2" rather than spending the time to resaw rough lumber. Probably you would have to face it on a jointer first before resawing it. 6/4 would yield better wood for 1/2" finished. It would leave enough for surfacing after you resawed it.
It's the only way to get a decent resaw. A straight and flat surface against the fence, first on one side then the opposite run over the jointer, then resaw down the center. Then you plane them, with the flat surface down on the bed to what ever dimension you seek. There is little waste this way, only enough to get back to a flat surface. You should start with 6/4 or what ever will get you closest to your desired final thickness after planing and jointing.

I use a 3 TPI Timberwolf blade either 1/2" wide or 3/4" depending on the size of the bandsaw. The 1/2" goes on a 14" saw, the 3/4" goes on the 18" saw. If your jointer will pass 6" then that's your maximum resaw capacity. If you have a wider jointer, then go bigger.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #7 of 12 Old 12-23-2014, 10:51 PM Thread Starter
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My main concern was what thickness material to buy. 6/4 seems to be the answer.

My band saw has a max of about 5 1/2 inches, maybe slightly less. The blade is a 1/2 incher (3TPI). The jointer is a 6 incher so I will have to make sure I have material that will fit. Even if I have to rip off some.

I don't recall what is available at the lumber yard. I may have to buy 6/4 x 8 inches wide. If so, that is OK. I have a ripping sled for the table saw so I can cut it to fit the machines and save the rest for a future project.

Here is a rough drawing of my project. It is subject to change.
The top will be hinged so I can get to the innards and store the extra length of power cord for the laptop.
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post #8 of 12 Old 12-24-2014, 07:51 AM
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With more than one way to joint material don't let jointer capacity stop you. I only have a 6 inch jointer but have successfully resawed 10 1/4 inch material, planer sleds work amazingly well��.

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post #9 of 12 Old 12-24-2014, 11:48 AM Thread Starter
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With more than one way to joint material don't let jointer capacity stop you. I only have a 6 inch jointer but have successfully resawed 10 1/4 inch material, planer sleds work amazingly well��.
Thanks.
The band saw is my limiting factor. I can only resaw about 5-5 1/2 inches. Up until now, I haven't had a need for an extension block. It wasn't available when I bought the saw new and I never got a round to buying it.
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post #10 of 12 Old 12-24-2014, 12:27 PM
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What I do when I am resawing one piece to get two is to joint both sides of the rough board. Then re saw it down the middle or as close as you can. Now you have two pieces with one side jointed on each so you are ready to go the the planer to plane to thickness. Also, I would go with 6/4.
Tom
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post #11 of 12 Old 12-24-2014, 12:45 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by TomC View Post
What I do when I am resawing one piece to get two is to joint both sides of the rough board. Then re saw it down the middle or as close as you can. Now you have two pieces with one side jointed on each so you are ready to go the the planer to plane to thickness. Also, I would go with 6/4.
Tom
Yeppirs. That is my plan.
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post #12 of 12 Old 03-29-2015, 04:03 PM
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I resaw thicker wood. Cut first on table saw both sides and then run thru bandsaw to finish middle part that table saw will net reach.
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