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post #1 of 18 Old 06-12-2013, 10:53 PM Thread Starter
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Need help in identifying gun

I was installing some kitchen cabinets ordered from a company when I noticed something interesting. They were using some kind of staple,point,spline that was shot in with a pneumatic gun to hold the face frame to the box. It was shot into the 90 degree meeting of the frame and box, catching a piece of both. I could not get one of the fasteners out to see its shape but it is either rectangular or triangular. They were very thin metal and were not corrugated. I am imagining that the guns head would be shaped in a right angle to allow the fastener to be driven. It seems like a great system and was very strong. I have searched the net but can't seem to find this gun/fastener. Has any one seen what I am talking about? I would be interested in purchasing a gun like that.
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post #2 of 18 Old 06-12-2013, 11:16 PM
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Is this the fastener? It's called a pinch dog.
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post #3 of 18 Old 06-12-2013, 11:19 PM
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I was installing some kitchen cabinets ordered from a company when I noticed something interesting. They were using some kind of staple,point,spline that was shot in with a pneumatic gun to hold the face frame to the box. It was shot into the 90 degree meeting of the frame and box, catching a piece of both. I could not get one of the fasteners out to see its shape but it is either rectangular or triangular. They were very thin metal and were not corrugated. I am imagining that the guns head would be shaped in a right angle to allow the fastener to be driven. It seems like a great system and was very strong. I have searched the net but can't seem to find this gun/fastener. Has any one seen what I am talking about? I would be interested in purchasing a gun like that.
Not sure but you may have been looking at Hartco spring clips.
http://www.ocfastening.com/hartco_cl...s_machines.htm

Most of this stuff is manufacturing oriented and, as such, tend to be pricey for the average joe... me included.

John

If I strive for perfection, I can generally achieve good'nuff, If I strive for good'nuff, I generally achieve firewood
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post #4 of 18 Old 06-12-2013, 11:22 PM
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I thought of pinch dogs but couldn't find pneumatic tooling although I don't know why you would need it for those.

John

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post #5 of 18 Old 06-13-2013, 09:08 AM Thread Starter
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Hi could not get a fastener out but it did not look like the hartco spring clip. Could definitely be the pinch dog but there has to be a gun for it because it would be impossible to nail into a tight perpendicular 90 degree angle that is made by the face frame and box. Plus the action has to be quick and powerful to not move the box as its being clipped to the face frame. As I mentioned before I would imagine that the gun itself would have a nose on it that is 90 degree to help nuzzle it into the right spot before shooting.

If you guys would keep looking so will I. Thank you for the clues.

John
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post #6 of 18 Old 06-13-2013, 09:22 AM
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Hi could not get a fastener out but it did not look like the hartco spring clip. Could definitely be the pinch dog but there has to be a gun for it because it would be impossible to nail into a tight perpendicular 90 degree angle that is made by the face frame and box. Plus the action has to be quick and powerful to not move the box as its being clipped to the face frame. As I mentioned before I would imagine that the gun itself would have a nose on it that is 90 degree to help nuzzle it into the right spot before shooting.

If you guys would keep looking so will I. Thank you for the clues.

John
It's been about 30 years since I've used pinch dogs but I used them with a pneumatic gun. The company I worked for used primarily Senco. I can already it will be a difficult item to find. A google search brings up items pertaining to canine.


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post #7 of 18 Old 06-13-2013, 09:52 AM Thread Starter
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Yes...same trouble here too Steve. Tried every combo of words but just get crazy results or adult sites! The fasteners are fairly thin and straight on top and my first impression was that it was a triangular push point like you would use in widow glazing work. I can think of so many things that I would use this tool for. I cant believe its not more popular or mass produced.
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post #8 of 18 Old 06-13-2013, 10:16 AM
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Sounds like it could be a wide crown staple.






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post #9 of 18 Old 06-13-2013, 10:19 AM
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The fasteners are fairly thin and straight on top and my first impression was that it was a triangular push point like you would use in widow glazing work. I can think of so many things that I would use this tool for. I cant believe its not more popular or mass produced.
The push glaziers fastener are called "glaziers points". Those along with pinch dogs are a manual install with a hammer.






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post #10 of 18 Old 06-13-2013, 05:13 PM
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Yes...same trouble here too Steve. Tried every combo of words but just get crazy results or adult sites! The fasteners are fairly thin and straight on top and my first impression was that it was a triangular push point like you would use in widow glazing work. I can think of so many things that I would use this tool for. I cant believe its not more popular or mass produced.
It's been so long perhaps there wasn't enough call for the fasteners for the company to keep making the gun. It's also possible Senco didn't make the gun. The company I worked for had me assemble cabinet faceframes with it. The nose of the gun was triangular in shape so it would fit it the corners to shoot them. I'm still looking for the gun but with my internet I'm not having much luck. I've been waiting for 20 minutes for the Senco fastener page to load to see if they even carry them. If you could use corrugated fasteners that would be easy. I use a Spotnail gun to shoot them.
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post #11 of 18 Old 06-14-2013, 07:57 AM Thread Starter
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This cabinet company is fairly new so I dont think they are using an old tool. Its not a wide crown staple because the fastener does not drive itself all the way in and you can see that it is solid. It has to be gun driven even if its a glazier type point because you could only imagine the force it would take to drive a piece of metal (square or triangular) into a piece of maple, on an angle, cross grain and all that while not misaligning the two pieces being held together. I am going to see if my boss can put me in touch with the cabinet manufacturer and see if I can solve this mystery.
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post #12 of 18 Old 06-14-2013, 08:08 AM
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This cabinet company is fairly new so I dont think they are using an old tool. Its not a wide crown staple because the fastener does not drive itself all the way in and you can see that it is solid. It has to be gun driven even if its a glazier type point because you could only imagine the force it would take to drive a piece of metal (square or triangular) into a piece of maple, on an angle, cross grain and all that while not misaligning the two pieces being held together. I am going to see if my boss can put me in touch with the cabinet manufacturer and see if I can solve this mystery.
Could this be it?
http://www.senco.com/FastenerDetails...Joint+Fastener






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post #13 of 18 Old 06-15-2013, 10:04 PM Thread Starter
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Closest thing i have seen yet. This fastener is "u" shaped and i do not recall the ones I saw being anything else but straight on top. I am looking into the gun that shoots these and will see if it looks right. Good find though either way!
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post #14 of 18 Old 06-16-2013, 08:50 AM
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This cabinet company is fairly new so I dont think they are using an old tool. Its not a wide crown staple because the fastener does not drive itself all the way in and you can see that it is solid. It has to be gun driven even if its a glazier type point because you could only imagine the force it would take to drive a piece of metal (square or triangular) into a piece of maple, on an angle, cross grain and all that while not misaligning the two pieces being held together. I am going to see if my boss can put me in touch with the cabinet manufacturer and see if I can solve this mystery.
Let us know if you find out something. I never did get senco's web site to load on my dial-up internet. I did search through every pneumatic fastener Granger sells and didn't find anything.
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post #15 of 18 Old 06-26-2013, 02:58 PM
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Maybe these? google it, Bostitch 450S2 - Corrugated to Wood, Jam-Free Lathing Stapler
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post #16 of 18 Old 06-26-2013, 03:00 PM
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senco.com SNS200XP-BST heavy wire stapler
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post #17 of 18 Old 06-27-2013, 08:52 AM Thread Starter
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not a stapler

Thanks for the two leads above but this is not a stapler. When the fastener is driven into the corner of two perpendicular pieces of wood (stile to cabinet box) the fastener does not bury itself completely and a good portion of it sticks out. I can see that the metal fastener is solid and not a crown staple. I am really starting to believe this is a specialty gun.
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post #18 of 18 Old 06-27-2013, 02:03 PM
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I had hoped you found it by now. I'm wondering now if what you saw was a miter fastener or picture frame nail like this. I did a trim job last week where the customer wanted corner blocks for the crown molding I was using. I noticed the corner blocks had these fasteners. I know a factory produced corner block that Home Depot was selling didn't have the nails driven in by hand.
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