Motice and Tenon How? - Page 3 - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #41 of 51 Old 06-24-2013, 02:54 PM
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can't paste the link on my tablet.

Search AWWM he has all sorts of info about traditional sash making
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post #42 of 51 Old 06-24-2013, 04:03 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by WarnerConstInc. View Post
A hauncher/relisher is on my list, but the old greenlee's or Americans are rare birds these days.

Don't want to start an argument, but the relish sole purpose was to clear the sticking on the styles. The rain water thing is kind of like an old wives tale.

This is a fried of mine's blog and my biggest source of help for getting my old babbitt machines purring like kittens.

Not going to give you an argument just a discussion, I understand what your talking about when you say clearing the stick, I used to do it with a flat chisel and an in channel 1/2" gouge making storm sash transoms.

Back in the U.K. in the 70/s I made a packet of money making the storm sash windows for builders that couldn't make them with mortice and tenons.the builders where just throwing these things in and fitting the glass in with door stop mitred and spring fitted.Forward on 10 years and I saw quite a few of these windows getting pulled out,the door stop had wicked at the mitres and the frames where shot.

I know my storm sash`s because I put the capillary`s on my self and they where still in order,and that's not a wife`s tale that's fact.Just bad workmanship on their part.
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post #43 of 51 Old 06-24-2013, 11:57 PM
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Billy I have read it through and it makes sense to me. I made my first simple MT joints the other day, all glue and no wedges like yours. Luckily it is not a high stress joint.
I want to make some chairs and I see how this would help to make a very strong chair. THANK YOU!
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post #44 of 51 Old 06-25-2013, 02:18 PM
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removable wedge

in the construction of the base of my bench, I am thinking about wedging the tenons on the outside so that the base can be knocked down when i move. Any advise for accomplishing this/its advisability?
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post #45 of 51 Old 06-25-2013, 02:45 PM
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Thanks for the thread. A bit off topic, but do you have a rule of thumb for minimum length of a stub tenon? I have read 5 times the width, but I think that would be too long for many applications.

edit: Reread that and it states the max benefit is gained from 5:1. Still seems very long.

Last edited by SeanStuart; 06-25-2013 at 03:35 PM. Reason: clarity
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post #46 of 51 Old 06-25-2013, 04:09 PM Thread Starter
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Railaw this thread was about mortice and tenon joints and as you can see what I built was a frame for one end of a work bench.

When you put a piece of wood on the bench to plane you put a lot of torque into the bench and JMHO but you will spend a lot of time running around the bench to tighten the wedges up.

I`V built quite a number of benches that are made to be knocked down later and how I build them is like this.

I build two frames as you see in this thread and then cut four 3"x2" to fit in between at the same level as the mortice and tenons,I drill a hole through the mortice and tenon and then through the end grain in the 3"x2" for about 6"and then at 90 degrees to this I drill a hole through the 3"x2".

Then feed threaded bar through the frame and into the end grain of the 3"x2" then hold a nut in the hole that you drilled at 90 degrees in the 3"x2" and turn the threaded bar into it, fit a nut and washer at the frame and then just tighten every thing up.

When it comes to moving you just let 4 nuts go at each end and the whole thing comes apart.

If you have trouble understanding this then its my fault just let me know and I`ll try to go through it in more detail. Billy
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post #47 of 51 Old 06-25-2013, 04:26 PM Thread Starter
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Sean you Know there is nothing written in stone about mortice and tenons but you have something there about 1/5 ths.

Lets take the bottom rail of a door the thickness of the door is 1"and 1/2" the tenon would be 1/2" wide but if the rail is say 12" high then you will not have one tenon but two tenon going into the rail with haunches.The tenons would relate to a rule of thumb of 1/5 ths but of the top of my head I can not recall exactly what it is sorry about that.
But as I said its all rule of thumb.
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post #48 of 51 Old 06-29-2013, 01:52 AM
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Thanks for the tips. On consideration I think I'll stic to the m&t joints. With the top removable it should move ok.

I just finished making my very first m&t joint, which is drying now. It is only 1/4" wide by less than 1/2". And I forgot to glue the wedge. But I was excited enough to stay up till 130 doing it. All hand tools by the way. Picture or 2 tomorrow. Wanted to say the wedging action was amazing to watch it tighten up the joint. Didn't know about the wedging until reading this thread so a big thanks to you!
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post #49 of 51 Old 06-30-2013, 01:10 PM Thread Starter
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Way to go man that's what its all about the enjoyment of doing something you`ve never done before without a shed full of machines.

All that Iām doing is passing on what was given to me freely(tricks of the trade Other mens ideas).

Sometimes to explain an idea with out pics is not the easiest thing so I took some pic`s to explain how I make a Knock-down bench.

First I make the two frames you`ve seen that .Then in the frame I drill a hole big enough to take a washer and then in this case a 3/8" hole into the apron then a 1" 1/4" hole at 90 degrees to this.
Then 3/8" threaded bar passed through the two parts and then fastened up,the pics explain it better.When you come to move it all you have to do is let 8 nuts go and every thing comes apart.
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post #50 of 51 Old 06-30-2013, 01:13 PM Thread Starter
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Last pic so it makes sense.
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post #51 of 51 Old 07-05-2013, 05:44 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeanStuart View Post
Thanks for the thread. A bit off topic, but do you have a rule of thumb for minimum length of a stub tenon? I have read 5 times the width, but I think that would be too long for many applications.

edit: Reread that and it states the max benefit is gained from 5:1. Still seems very long.

Sean its just popped into my head what the rule of 1/5 th is.
Lets say you are building a door that is 1 1/2 thick if you multiply this by 5 it gives you 7 1/2, any rail of 7 1/2 or over must have a double mortice and tenon not a single.A single mortice and tenon would mean cutting to much away from the stile and making it weak.

But as I`v said its all just rule of thumb, but it makes sense. Billy
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