Mortise and Tenon Joints - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 12 Old 01-29-2012, 10:47 PM Thread Starter
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Mortise and Tenon Joints

I built an Arts and Crafts Morris chair for my daughter. This chair had 96 mortiseand tenon joints. I have always chopped the mortise first then cut the tenon to fit.

I have been wondering if you people think this is the correct order or should I cut the tenon first. Is this the old tail first, pins first arguement?
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post #2 of 12 Old 01-29-2012, 11:31 PM
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I guess it depend on how you cut your mortises.

I have converted an old drill press into a hollow chisel mortiser which cuts a consistent width mortise. Then for consistent thickness tenons, I made a spacer of a width that holds two identicle saw blades apart to form the tenon at the exact thickness.

What are you using to cut the mortises?

Bret
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post #3 of 12 Old 01-30-2012, 12:04 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lola Ranch
I guess it depend on how you cut your mortises.

I have converted an old drill press into a hollow chisel mortiser which cuts a consistent width mortise. Then for consistent thickness tenons, I made a spacer of a width that holds two identicle saw blades apart to form the tenon at the exact thickness.

What are you using to cut the mortises?

Bret
I chop motises with a chisel and cut tenons with a tenon saw. Everything by hand.
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post #4 of 12 Old 01-30-2012, 12:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wrangler View Post
I chop motises with a chisel and cut tenons with a tenon saw. Everything by hand.
That's a lot of hand work!

I cut most of the M and T joints on my rocking chairs by hand, mainly due to the fact that with all the curves and compound angles, it's the easiest way.

The method I described in my previous post gives me a very good fit which is difficult for me to reproduce by hand.

Tell me, do you pre-drill the hand chopped mortises with a Forstner bit as I do? Or are you all "natural"?

Bret
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post #5 of 12 Old 01-30-2012, 12:42 AM Thread Starter
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Most often I don't drill befoe chopping; when I do drill, I use a brace and bit.
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post #6 of 12 Old 01-30-2012, 01:32 AM
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Do you have any power tools? Do you use them at all? Is this use of hand tools just a personal preference? How are you with hand planes?

Bret
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post #7 of 12 Old 01-30-2012, 04:27 AM
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Generally, I machine or cut the mortices first. It helps to drill out most of the waste. I've done both the mortices and tenons with a router. Doing the tenons on the TS is the fastest way.

I've also done both by hand, and depending on size doesn't take that long once you have the hang of it.






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post #8 of 12 Old 01-30-2012, 05:17 AM
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I'd say if cutting the mortise first works for you, stick with it.

When doing everything by hand, I will cut the tenon first. Then transfer the the lines for the mortise. After its squared up, I'll trim the tenon with a chisel or shoulder plane for a snug fit.

When in "all hand tool mode" I do like using a bit and brace, that sweet slicing sound as it augers out the waste is so pleasant.
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post #9 of 12 Old 01-30-2012, 08:51 AM
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If you do the mortise first, it is a lot easier to snuck the tenons up to the last thousands of an inch, to give that perfect fit.
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post #10 of 12 Old 01-30-2012, 09:30 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lola Ranch
Do you have any power tools? Do you use them at all? Is this use of hand tools just a personal preference? How are you with hand planes?

Bret
The only power tool I use is a Dewalt cordless drill. I have arthritus in my hands and the twisting of a screwdriver is debilitating.

Hand tools are a preference for many reasons. Noise, dust, cost, and space available, trying to keep the old body in shape to name a few.

I am retired, furniture building is a hobby. If I had power tools I would be too productive for the market.
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post #11 of 12 Old 01-30-2012, 09:32 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WillemJM
If you do the mortise first, it is a lot easier to snuck the tenons up to the last thousands of an inch, to give that perfect fit.
This is kinda what I thought too. It's easier to pare on the outside than on the inside!
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post #12 of 12 Old 01-30-2012, 10:14 AM
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Definitely easier to pare and fit a tenon if mortices are consistent.
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