Mitered Joint Spline Help - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 7 Old 12-04-2015, 07:36 AM Thread Starter
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Mitered Joint Spline Help

I'm looking to make a jewelry box out of a piece of zebrawood, so I'm looking to miter the corners to keep the stripes smoothly running the outside of the box. I was simply going to cut flat 45* miters, then splines. What are my options for splines?

I was looking at this jig: http://www.rockler.com/rockler-large-box-spline-jig
The appeal of this is using different bits in the router. I think I could also take off that guide and use it on the table saw as well for simple slot splines. But if I use a router, and use an odd bit, for example, a dovetail or circular bit, how would I make the splines for that?

Also, I'm open to other types of joinery that would work here, but I'm pretty new to woodworking and don't have too many tools or skills.
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post #2 of 7 Old 12-04-2015, 08:36 AM
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In my opinion that type of spline miter is more for show than functional. If a stronger joint is what you want use this type of spline miter. It can be done on a table saw.
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post #3 of 7 Old 12-04-2015, 12:11 PM
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A biscuit cutter works well with small boxes like you're making.
The biscuits come in 3 different sizes. The tool can cut at a 45 degree angle for the miters.
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post #4 of 7 Old 12-04-2015, 12:41 PM
where's my table saw?
 
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notice the grain direction

That is a perfect splined miter. The spline's grain is running 90 degrees to the kerf, or is cross grain. It's more difficult to make splines this way, but they are way stronger than a ripped piece running with the grain.


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #5 of 7 Old 12-14-2015, 02:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Neul View Post
In my opinion that type of spline miter is more for show than functional. If a stronger joint is what you want use this type of spline miter. It can be done on a table saw.
How do you make the groove for the spline on the TS?

Do you need a special jig to hold the mitered piece flush against the table so you can make the cut?
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post #6 of 7 Old 12-14-2015, 05:03 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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nope

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexorg View Post
How do you make the groove for the spline on the TS?

Do you need a special jig to hold the mitered piece flush against the table so you can make the cut?
I would just set the blade to the 45 degree bevel you used to make the edge cuts, bump the fence over to center the cut on the bevel and make a test cut on a scrap. Once I'm satisfied where the kerf is, I would lock the fence and make all my kerfs exactly the same.

FYI gluing up a beveled edge box or cabinet can be a pain because the joints want to slide apart when you apply pressure to the clamps. The spline prevents this and makes a stronger joint.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-14-2015 at 05:06 AM.
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post #7 of 7 Old 12-14-2015, 06:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vexorg View Post
How do you make the groove for the spline on the TS?

Do you need a special jig to hold the mitered piece flush against the table so you can make the cut?
You don't need a special jig, you just set the blade on a 45 degree angle and run the wood against the fence or if the stock is narrow use your miter gauge to insure the cut is straight.
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