Mitered corner fix - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 16 Old 01-19-2011, 11:04 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 101
View pwoller's Photo Album My Photos
Mitered corner fix

So I'm struggling through building a toy/dress up clothes box for my god daughter. I cut the edges of the box to 45 degrees and I still have gaps in some of the joints. I am using 3/4 inch oak boards and I glued the sides and bottom of the box up with titebond 2. Is there a trick to filling in the voids? I've read about using a screw driver on the corners to fold them over but that seems a bit extreem. Anyone have a good way to hide or fix the gaps? THey are no more then an 1/16th of an inch.
pwoller is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to pwoller For This Useful Post:
SteveEl (01-21-2011)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 12:48 AM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,355
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Are Ya feelin' cornered?

For a clear finish, you can hand plane the sharp corners down to a flat, say 3/8" wide or so and glue on a contrasting 1/8" strip of darker wood. Just so you know mitered corners are very difficult to make unless you have very precise equipment and very flat wood. Either a slight variation on the angle or the depth of the miter or a warp in the wood will create a gap. You could have all 3?
A toy box tells me "paint", if so that will make it easier. I have used Bondo, Durhams Rock Hard, and lacquer putty with good results. Even a Spackle product will fill narrow gaps.
BTW: Sometimes you have to turn a mistake into a design element. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #3 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 04:50 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
With gaps that wide, I would worry about how good the joint is. You didn't say what the finish will be. If it's a natural or stained finish, fill won't fix the integrity of the joint. If it's painted, you could countersink some screws.

Personally, I would redo the box. Dry fitting the joinery would be a good indicator of the finished box.










.
cabinetman is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 05:12 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 101
View pwoller's Photo Album My Photos
I measured with my calipers and the biggest gap is .035 inches. I really didnt want to paint the box because it was wood I milled and has very pretty grain. I was thinking of staining it. I can add corner brackets to the insides if I need to. Should I just round the corners down and sand them?
pwoller is offline  
post #5 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 05:23 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwoller View Post
I measured with my calipers and the biggest gap is .035 inches. I really didnt want to paint the box because it was wood I milled and has very pretty grain. I was thinking of staining it. I can add corner brackets to the insides if I need to. Should I just round the corners down and sand them?
If you can secure the corners so they won't separate, that would be the way to go. You could use trim screws to hold it together. You could peen the edges gently to close the gap. Any holes you have to make can be filled with touch up crayon after finishing.










.
cabinetman is offline  
post #6 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 05:30 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 101
View pwoller's Photo Album My Photos
If I put a couple spleens into each corner would that add strength to the joints?
pwoller is offline  
post #7 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 05:35 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwoller View Post
If I put a couple spleens into each corner would that add strength to the joints?
I hope they won't come from anyone living. If done right, splines won't close the gap, but will keep the parts from coming apart.










.
cabinetman is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to cabinetman For This Useful Post:
SteveEl (01-21-2011)
post #8 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 05:36 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 101
View pwoller's Photo Album My Photos
Sorry splines. When you say peen the edges closed do you mean with a hammer?
pwoller is offline  
post #9 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 05:55 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,355
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Huh?

I thought the box was assembled? How you gonna put the splines in? Just askin' bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #10 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 06:05 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 101
View pwoller's Photo Album My Photos
pwoller is offline  
post #11 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 06:27 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: lincolnton, NC
Posts: 136
View NYwoodworks's Photo Album My Photos
I am with Cman on this one. If it were me I would probably build another one.

The reason being every time you look at it you are going to get a frustrated feeling wishing the joints fit together. It is going to gnaw at you and drive you nuts and you will loose sleep over it. When you build something like this consider the fact that it may be around a long time haunting you.
This may be a little harsh but you get the point..LOL!!

With that being said wouldn't be nice to see it and go ahhhhh what a nice job I did?

I am not trying to guilt you into redoing it but if you do decide to, check your equipment for accuracy and like Cman said dry fit or sample fit a scrap piece before you glue it.

Many times on outside corners I may go "just ever so slightly" beyond 45 degree's just so the outside corners meet at the point better.
NYwoodworks is offline  
post #12 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 06:32 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,355
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Of course

Quote:
Originally Posted by pwoller View Post
Then I would look into this Dovetail Spline Jig since it will "lock" the joints together, rather than just a superficial insert. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
The Following User Says Thank You to woodnthings For This Useful Post:
H. A. S. (01-21-2011)
post #13 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 08:21 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 101
View pwoller's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYwoodworks View Post
I am with Cman on this one. If it were me I would probably build another one.

The reason being every time you look at it you are going to get a frustrated feeling wishing the joints fit together. It is going to gnaw at you and drive you nuts and you will loose sleep over it. When you build something like this consider the fact that it may be around a long time haunting you.
This may be a little harsh but you get the point..LOL!!

With that being said wouldn't be nice to see it and go ahhhhh what a nice job I did?

I am not trying to guilt you into redoing it but if you do decide to, check your equipment for accuracy and like Cman said dry fit or sample fit a scrap piece before you glue it.

Many times on outside corners I may go "just ever so slightly" beyond 45 degree's just so the outside corners meet at the point better.
I appreciate the suggestion but I'm not starting over. Good tip in the just over 45 degrees on the edges to get the points to align.
pwoller is offline  
post #14 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 09:12 PM
John
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: La Crosse, Kansas
Posts: 3,028
View jschaben's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwoller View Post
I appreciate the suggestion but I'm not starting over. Good tip in the just over 45 degrees on the edges to get the points to align.
Given the stock is all absolutely the same thickness and not warped or twisted, good miters require BOTH accurate 45* angles AND the opposite sides MUST be of equal length. I always check my saw with a square before cutting the angles and use stop blocks for cutting the sides.
jschaben is offline  
post #15 of 16 Old 01-20-2011, 10:32 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 26,355
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Corner splines


The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is online now  
post #16 of 16 Old 01-21-2011, 07:16 AM
Senior Member
 
SteveEl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,560
View SteveEl's Photo Album My Photos
Don't do joinery with a living person's spleen...



As a beginner, here's my take on goofs and starting over....

I first look to my work for structural safety and that's a moving target depending on how the thing might get used. If my daughter could climb on it when my back is turned, then I assume she will, and I overengineer it.

Next, I am just starting to look at beauty and perfection as a secondary goal, and well..... I've got a ways to go. But I rarely junk my work. I'm collecting neat rocks that I want to one day build into a hearth and mantlepiece of native rock. Each one's different and each will have a story. Many of my woodshop goofs are similar. I set my eye on perfection, I give it all I've got, and sometimes I still screw up, but then I take pride in giving it my best. Sometimes I even enjoy seeing my mistakes, since they all have their story as I acquire better skills. That's the sort of thing I want my kid to learn... so I have to be that way myself.

So good for you! I probably wouldn't start over either.

I like Bill's ideas of turning it into a design element (maybe distress the rest of the wood?) and also trimming out the corner with some contrasting wood. You could cover it with some decorative metal work too, sort of like old steamer trunks used.
SteveEl is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Mitered Plywood Edge Mikeldigra Tips, Tricks, & Homemade Jigs 7 10-20-2015 10:52 PM
Mitered Bridle Joint jimc48 Joinery 1 08-03-2010 10:27 AM
Mitered Bridle Joint b00kemdano Joinery 5 09-30-2009 04:34 PM
Box with 4 sides mitered tatagatha General Woodworking Discussion 6 06-22-2009 08:34 AM
Mitered Box Corners Ken Johnson General Woodworking Discussion 4 09-02-2008 01:06 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome