Measuring inches - I'm done..... - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 12:33 PM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
WillemJM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Pinehurst, NC
Posts: 1,200
View WillemJM's Photo Album My Photos
Measuring inches - I'm done.....

After 11 years here in the good old US of A, I have religiously worked in inches. Using my Laptop to divide fractions and more fractions and then measuring them.

Just saw a tape measure at Lowes in mm, after asking myself why the heck I do this, it ended up in my basket.

I am done. Will do what I did when still young and dumb, working with whole numbers only and occasionally with a metric decimal on my vernier caliper, which never got changed to inches.

So much easier, don't have to think.
WillemJM is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 02:08 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 3
View laviesman's Photo Album My Photos
I remember back in grade school 1970's talk of the US switching to the metric system, almost 40 years and it still on the Imperial system. Looks like it's here to stay...
laviesman is offline  
post #3 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 06:07 PM
Old Methane Gas Cloud
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Huntington Beach, California
Posts: 3,500
View rrich's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by laviesman View Post
I remember back in grade school 1970's talk of the US switching to the metric system, almost 40 years and it still on the Imperial system. Looks like it's here to stay...
At that time, Gerald Ford was trying to take the country's mind off of Nixon and Watergate. One of the things that was tried was the switch to Metric. It was a big deal. In a machinist magazine I even saw ads for metric tools including "Metric screw drivers, both slot and Phillips."

The change to the metric system was a failure because approximately 50% of the population of the US uttered these words,
"I will not cook in Metric." And thus the great switch to Metric failed.

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
Huntington Beach, California
Remember that when we have the "BIG ONE" everything east of the Rockies falls into the ocean.
rrich is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 06:11 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,593
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrich;268090....
The change to the metric system was a failure because approximately 50% of the population of the US uttered these words,
[B
"I will not cook in Metric." And thus the great switch to Metric failed.[/B]
I refuse to drive in kilometers per hour. bill

I had a metric hammer once...it came with no instructions...I ditched it...

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-03-2011 at 08:26 PM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #5 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 07:05 PM
Senior Member
 
Wrangler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: South Western Minnesota
Posts: 825
View Wrangler's Photo Album My Photos
I often eyeball dimensions and use a story stick to get all of the legs the right length and my marking gauge is uncalibrated. I then avoid both systems. ya can't misread a rule if ya don't use one!!
Wrangler is offline  
post #6 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 07:10 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: I went back to my private Idaho
Posts: 2,321
View Brink's Photo Album My Photos
I dunno, I bounce between the two all day long, got used to it a long time ago. But I still have trouble with converting temps quickly.
Brink is offline  
post #7 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 08:05 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,593
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
back and forth then out

I was raised in the Imperial system and used it for 40 years, the decimal version in 1/100, not fractional. Then GM converted their Design Studios to the Metric system and gave us all new steel scales and changed the stations on the platforms used to measure the lengths down the side of the cars. I would come home and do construction in feet and inches. I've never used it for woodworking, but I do recognize the advantages from having worked with it.

The ladies I know would not understand metric dimension body parts, but numerically it sounds like a lot more...just sayin'

My problem is I have both Metric bolt and nut and Imperial and I have to keep them separate 'cause they don't interchange. Plywood is now sold in inches for length and width, but it's sometimes, more often than not, Metric in thickness, go figure.

Now you have to make Metric dados and have Metric router bits.
go figure again. I'm stickin' with inches until I lose all my tape measures. bill

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 12-03-2011 at 10:02 PM.
woodnthings is online now  
post #8 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 08:12 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: I went back to my private Idaho
Posts: 2,321
View Brink's Photo Album My Photos
"914-609-914, what a winning hand!"

Maybe it woulda worked in Brick House
Brink is offline  
post #9 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 08:13 PM
Senior Member
 
PPBART's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 200
View PPBART's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brink View Post
I dunno, I bounce between the two all day long, got used to it a long time ago. But I still have trouble with converting temps quickly.
Me too -- worked for a Dutch company for ~25 yrs, spent a lot of time in Europe. Their plants were metric, US plants were Imperial. Personally, I prefer metric for home shop projects.
PPBART is offline  
post #10 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 08:45 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,470
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Why would you need a computer to divide measurements? I have never built anything so large that I could not do most of the math in my head. Or a pencil and the back of a board if more complicated.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #11 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 09:15 PM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
Why would you need a computer to divide measurements? I have never built anything so large that I could not do most of the math in my head. Or a pencil and the back of a board if more complicated.

George
+1. When I started out there weren't even handheld calculators. It's amazing what a pencil, pad and a brain can do.








.
cabinetman is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to cabinetman For This Useful Post:
Big Stud (12-11-2011)
post #12 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 09:25 PM
In History is the Future
 
firemedic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: South Louisiana - Gonzales
Posts: 6,423
View firemedic's Photo Album My Photos
I frequently use a metric steel drafting ruler for laying out small divisions such as Dovetails but I still think in inches and feet.

~tom ...it's better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt...
firemedic is offline  
post #13 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 09:36 PM
Senior Sawdust Producer
 
Leo G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Windsor Locks, Connecticut
Posts: 4,363
View Leo G's Photo Album My Photos
I do digital inches. Back to whole numbers again. What's the difference if I am doing 54.65" or 1388.11 mm

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
Finishing is 3 parts chemistry and 1 part VooDoo http://lrgwood.com
Leo G is offline  
post #14 of 38 Old 12-03-2011, 11:28 PM
Senior Member
 
mackem's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: U.K.
Posts: 445
View mackem's Photo Album My Photos
I use this system these days.
Attached Images
 

Kevin.

“There are no secrets in woodworking, and everything should be shared.” Sam Maloof
mackem is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to mackem For This Useful Post:
BWSmith (12-04-2011)
post #15 of 38 Old 12-04-2011, 06:25 AM
Really underground garage
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: mnts of Va
Posts: 2,552
View BWSmith's Photo Album My Photos
We have a full-on machine shop.....am completely "tooled" in Std and Metric.Two lathes,one for metwic one std.Makes no never mind which system is used as to our capability's.BUT as much as metric proponents want to espouse its virtues....it pales in comparison to std when threading,irrespective as to machines leadscrew.

But other than that,don't make much difference.....you could give me a stick with a bunch of scratch marks on it,and theres simple effective ways of utilizing it for measuring.....whatever floats your boat?BW

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.
BWSmith is offline  
post #16 of 38 Old 12-04-2011, 07:14 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,470
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo G View Post
I do digital inches. Back to whole numbers again. What's the difference if I am doing 54.65" or 1388.11 mm
The difference is that I can mark .65 inches on a board. I would find it very difficult to mark .11mm.

If you are working in metric I would think that the smallest dimension that would ever be used is a whole milimeter. In the English system the most common dimension used as the smallest is 1/32" In a pinch you can get down to 1/64".

This is speaking in terms of woodworking.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #17 of 38 Old 12-04-2011, 07:17 AM
Really underground garage
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: mnts of Va
Posts: 2,552
View BWSmith's Photo Album My Photos
George,just a FYI.......on a quality framing square theres a .01" scale on the corner.We use it frequently with deviders.Just sayin,BW

Those who say it cannot be done shouldn't interrupt the people doing it.
BWSmith is offline  
post #18 of 38 Old 12-04-2011, 07:28 AM
Old School
 
cabinetman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: So. Florida
Posts: 24,027
View cabinetman's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
The difference is that I can mark .65 inches on a board. I would find it very difficult to mark .11mm.

If you are working in metric I would think that the smallest dimension that would ever be used is a whole milimeter. In the English system the most common dimension used as the smallest is 1/32" In a pinch you can get down to 1/64".

This is speaking in terms of woodworking.

George
+1. Heck yeah. Whatever numbering system you choose to use, it's my experience not to mix them up. Converting fractions to decimal, is not the same as using metric. Decimal equivalents can go many places on either side of the decimal. Coming up with half of a mm seems a stretch in a woodworking shop. Half of a fraction is just doubling the denominator (the bottom number).

And for all you metric guys...you probably thought the denominator was a new Schwarzenegger movie.








.
cabinetman is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to cabinetman For This Useful Post:
lawrence (12-08-2011)
post #19 of 38 Old 12-04-2011, 10:06 AM
Senior Sawdust Producer
 
Leo G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Windsor Locks, Connecticut
Posts: 4,363
View Leo G's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
The difference is that I can mark .65 inches on a board. I would find it very difficult to mark .11mm.

If you are working in metric I would think that the smallest dimension that would ever be used is a whole milimeter. In the English system the most common dimension used as the smallest is 1/32" In a pinch you can get down to 1/64".

This is speaking in terms of woodworking.

George
I work to 5 thou on my tablesaw. I work to 1/128 with a ruler and my eye. Working to a millimeter would make my projects look like a hack made them.

Measure Twice Cut Once -- It's a lot easier to cut more off then it is to cut MORON.
Finishing is 3 parts chemistry and 1 part VooDoo http://lrgwood.com
Leo G is offline  
post #20 of 38 Old 12-04-2011, 10:12 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 9
View Elliott's Photo Album My Photos
I was born in the states, but have been in switzerland for 15 years and learned the trade here. I went to canada few yearsback for a log building class and couldnt quite grasp the imperial mesurements... Metric does seemeasier to follow, but i like the difference of the english system, it has more caracter you could say. Whatever it takes to get the job done, right? If your more at ease with one system you might as well stick with it.
Elliott is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
# 8 wood screw 4 inches wsommariva General Woodworking Discussion 28 11-12-2014 08:53 AM
5 3/4 Inches in diameter Warnock Project Showcase 13 08-23-2011 06:30 PM
Measuring Bob Guercio General Woodworking Discussion 4 03-06-2011 07:32 PM
3/4, 4/4,5/4, 6/4 Is this quarter inches? IndyEd General Woodworking Discussion 15 12-17-2008 10:21 PM
Measuring tape - not only for measuring niki Shop Safety 9 12-08-2007 02:01 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome