Making a picture frame - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 8 Old 08-03-2020, 02:57 PM Thread Starter
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Making a picture frame

Does anyone have a simple HowTo for making mitered picture frames. I have a good jig for cutting the miters and a good clamp, but I struggle with accurate measurements of the four sides of the frame. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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post #2 of 8 Old 08-05-2020, 10:41 AM
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Best way for consistent lengths is to set up a stop when cutting the second miters, what type of saw are you using?

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #3 of 8 Old 09-06-2020, 12:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankC View Post
Best way for consistent lengths is to set up a stop when cutting the second miters, what type of saw are you using?
x2
Cut all the long sides, then cut all the short sides. Unless you have a streaking color or pattern you want to match up at the frame corners. Last year I made ~15 frames out of blue stained pine. In retrospect, the ideal setup would have been with two miter saws, with stop blocks. Cut a piece on the long side, go to the other saw, cut the short side, that way the blue streaks would have lined up at the corners on the final product. Otherwise, one saw is great. Cut all the long sides, then the short sides.

BTW, I tried all sorts of clamping techniques and found the best for me was the strap-style clamps that loop a nylon strap around the frame.

Last edited by Lakewood Brian; 09-06-2020 at 12:47 AM.
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post #4 of 8 Old 09-06-2020, 05:53 AM
where's my table saw?
 
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There are three separate issues with frames ....

The first is cutting precise angles.
The second is cutting precise lengths.
The third is gluing and clamping them at 90 degrees in each corner.


The first involves your saw setting, it's either on 45 degrees or not. You need to cut test pieces and mate them until you get a 90 degree corner with a known square.


The second means clamping a stop block to your saw fence for repeatable lengths, OR using marks or stop blocks on your work bench at the precise lengths and laying the pieces down, fitting them in between.


The final issue is using a means of clamping the pieces squarely. I have 4 framing clamps which allow the pieces to sit inside them and them apply clamping pressure with screw type handles.
These are some cheap ones from Harbor Freight:
https://www.harborfreight.com/3-in-c...amp-63653.html


These are better and more like mine:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B089ZQLLB5...xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==


You can use strap clamps or the long threaded rod system, but they are tricky to get situated and won't guarantee a square corner. I wouldn't want to thread a nut for more than a few inches to adjust them myself.



I made these mitered corner doors 48" tall by 17" wide and splined the corners for strength. Splined corners are not needed on a picture frame unless the glass is huge and heavy.
https://www.woodworkingtalk.com/memb...5398-100-1334/





The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #5 of 8 Old 09-06-2020, 07:26 AM
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While miter joints are traditional joints and look nice I was never a fan of them and repaired many for people over the years that have failed, its not the strongest joint.
Any frames I make I do with a half lap dado with flat stock, easy to do, stronger with a greater gluing surface, butt the edges and it is always 90 degrees if your saw cut is true, of course this method doesn't work with shaped frame molding but it is what I prefer to do.
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post #6 of 8 Old 09-06-2020, 10:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redeared View Post
While miter joints are traditional joints and look nice I was never a fan of them and repaired many for people over the years that have failed, its not the strongest joint.
Any frames I make I do with a half lap dado with flat stock, easy to do, stronger with a greater gluing surface, butt the edges and it is always 90 degrees if your saw cut is true, of course this method doesn't work with shaped frame molding but it is what I prefer to do.
I made two flat frames for my spouse at her request this past week. She wanted them right away, so I asked her if half lap joints would be okay to get the job done quickly, and she agreed. I cut the joints with a dado blade. The frames came out perfectly square. It hardly interrupted my other work at all.
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post #7 of 8 Old 09-06-2020, 05:11 PM
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A picture frame is typically mitered .....

I use half laps for swinging gates where there's some weight or down force because after gluing and screwing them together they are very strong. A picture frame just need to look nice and pretty, not much strength required as a rule. Now add different contours which are typical of most picture frames, and miters are the only way it will work.

There are a few "professional" framing/mitering machines, one slices the miters and the really high end ones have two blades attached to two motors and long tables, for right and left hand miter cuts:
https://www.google.com/search?q=PIST...XkQ9QF6BAgKEDU


Get out your wallet with all your credit cards for those ^

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 09-06-2020 at 05:36 PM.
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post #8 of 8 Old 09-08-2020, 06:11 PM
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I bought one of these from Rockler. I am having good results from using it.
https://www.rockler.com/45-degree-miter-sled
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