Hanging Shelving - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 6 Old 01-08-2019, 11:06 PM Thread Starter
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Hanging Shelving

Hey folks! I'm just jumping into ww and have a problem I can't figure out. My wife came up with an idea for wall shelving and I'm working on the execution piece. I plan to build from 1x10 stock pine and am having trouble figuring out how to get these hung with a decent amount of support. The caveat is that her idea includes leaving off the backs. My initial thought is to put a back on the middle cube and screw into two studs, but am concerned that the outer cubes will sag over time due to not having enough support. The plan is to just glue up the boxes to stay away from having noticeable hardware.

I'm open to pretty much any feedback.

Also included my most recent projects just because.
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post #2 of 6 Old 01-09-2019, 08:19 AM
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I would inset a plywood back in each of the two upper boxes where they intersect the two large boxes and put mounting screws through the plywood. By the same token, I would put dowels in every joint that catch all parts in each joint. Take for instance the upper left box: construct the box as a square with all 4 corners doweled. Then attach the lower bigger rectangle with dowels that go through not only the sides of the smaller square into the rectangle, but project into the smaller square and into the little square in the corner.

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post #3 of 6 Old 01-09-2019, 12:17 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alchymist View Post
I would inset a plywood back in each of the two upper boxes where they intersect the two large boxes and put mounting screws through the plywood. By the same token, I would put dowels in every joint that catch all parts in each joint. Take for instance the upper left box: construct the box as a square with all 4 corners doweled. Then attach the lower bigger rectangle with dowels that go through not only the sides of the smaller square into the rectangle, but project into the smaller square and into the little square in the corner.
Those seem like some sound tips; thanks much for the input!
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post #4 of 6 Old 01-11-2019, 09:06 AM
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As far as your project goes, a simple cross half lap of your frames at the intersections would easily suffice. As far as hanging them without noticable hardware, for a beginner like yourself, a French cleat would probably be the most simple way, but the boards you're using are quite narrow. Maybe try routing out a small and shallow mortise and use little slotted plates for the screw head to hang on. Thin boards with hidden hardware doesnt leave a whole lot of options for you.
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Last edited by BigJim; 01-11-2019 at 08:43 PM. Reason: Unnecessary
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post #5 of 6 Old 01-11-2019, 10:33 AM
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I like @Flatlander38's suggestion of using half lap joints where the "boxes" intersect. To me, the challenges are:

1. The choice of joints for the box corners.
2. Marking and cutting the half lap joints accurately, neatly, and correctly.
3. Squaring everything perfectly for clamping and gluing.
4. The finish.
5. Hanging it on the wall.

If the joints for the box corners are strong and you hang the piece properly, the bottoms shouldn't sag unless they are subjected to unreasonable weight beyond "design limits." If that happens, then the boards may be too thin for the weight they are supposed to hold.

The real trick may be designing how it hangs on the wall. You can use as many attachment points as you need, not just on the studs.

How deep will the shelves be? What will they hold? Heavy books? Lightweight flower decorations?

Last edited by Tool Agnostic; 01-11-2019 at 10:48 AM.
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post #6 of 6 Old 01-12-2019, 12:34 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tool Agnostic View Post
I like @Flatlander38's suggestion of using half lap joints where the "boxes" intersect. To me, the challenges are:

1. The choice of joints for the box corners.
2. Marking and cutting the half lap joints accurately, neatly, and correctly.
3. Squaring everything perfectly for clamping and gluing.
4. The finish.
5. Hanging it on the wall.

If the joints for the box corners are strong and you hang the piece properly, the bottoms shouldn't sag unless they are subjected to unreasonable weight beyond "design limits." If that happens, then the boards may be too thin for the weight they are supposed to hold.

The real trick may be designing how it hangs on the wall. You can use as many attachment points as you need, not just on the studs.

How deep will the shelves be? What will they hold? Heavy books? Lightweight flower decorations?
Nothing more than some knick knacks. I'm not worried about the items going up there massively contributing to the weight; it just occurred to me that the initial doodle she did up wasn't going to work without either some creative solutions for mounting or adding backs to some, or all, of the boxes.

At this point, it's going on the back burner. I realize I need to get some more joinery experience under my belt and would rather do that on some shop pieces first. I've got a laundry list of other projects to keep me busy in the meantime.
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