Gorilla Glue??? - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 30 Old 09-13-2009, 08:09 AM Thread Starter
 
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Gorilla Glue???

Is this stuff good or is there something better???
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post #2 of 30 Old 09-13-2009, 08:15 AM
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I used it when it was newer, did not like it. Messy, expands, limited shelf life, etc. Best used on outdoor projects that don't show. I still like yellow glue. Titebond II does the job for me.

Some people swear by it, I swear at it.
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post #3 of 30 Old 09-13-2009, 10:45 AM
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Gorilla Glue is a polyurethane adhesive. Taunton Press ran some interesting tests in conjunction with a university in Ohio and demonstrated that for wood applications polyurethane had only about half the strength of PVA. Hide glues had about two thirds the strength of PVA.
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post #4 of 30 Old 09-13-2009, 11:36 AM
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I have a bottle. Don't like it. They make a great duct tape, though.
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post #5 of 30 Old 09-13-2009, 12:28 PM
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Gorilla Glue

I was thinking it was just me. Can't seem to get it to work as advertised.
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post #6 of 30 Old 09-13-2009, 12:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SeeDBee View Post
I was thinking it was just me. Can't seem to get it to work as advertised.
Nope, not just you ... messy stuff. I HAVE found it to be a little stronger than what I would gather from the other posts here but I think that may be because the little I did use was on very small pieces so actually hard to judge strength.

I swear by yellow glue for just about everything, though others say titebond is much better. It's not that I doubt them, it's just that I buy the stuff by the gallon pretty often and titebond gets a little expensive that way and the yellow works just great.

Paul

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post #7 of 30 Old 09-13-2009, 09:42 PM
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I don't think that the expense is worth it.

What I've noticed is:

GG needs to have close fitting surfaces for maximum holding power

GG needs moisture to cure

GG expands and gives the false impression that it is a gap filling glue

I prefer Tite Bond III to GG. It seems to be as strong with none of the downsides.

BTW - Removing cured GG from your hands is easy. Just wear some latex gloves and work up a good sweat. The perspiration forces the GG off of your skin. (Wear the gloves while using??? Don't go there.)

Use the right tool for the job.

Rich (Tilting right)
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post #8 of 30 Old 09-13-2009, 11:40 PM
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Gorilla glue is good. The caveat is it has to be in the right applications. Gluing wood to wood, you're better off with a PVA. I use it on lots of applications, but not on anything wood to wood that I want to keep together for any structural integrity or length of time.
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post #9 of 30 Old 09-14-2009, 08:19 AM
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I use it all the time and like it. No failures and the expansion doesn't bother me and I've learned to work with it.

Do one thing at a time, do it well, then move on.
www.bigdaveswoodworks.com
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post #10 of 30 Old 09-15-2009, 11:05 AM
 
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Now someone may have mentioned it and I missed it, but there is Gorilla Glue and there is Gorilla Wood Glue.

Short story long...

Gorilla Wood glue (in my opinion) is awesome. Limited clamping time makes it perfect for building cabinets. I assemble a cabinet with gorilla wood and biscuits or pocket screws and it works great. Building a whole kitchen full of cabinets or entertainment center is relatively time sensitive plus I just don't have enough clamps for all of them.

If I'm going to build heirloom furniture I'd probably go with titebond II because I expect to be patient when clamping and fastening.
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post #11 of 30 Old 10-22-2009, 11:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRecklessOne View Post
Now someone may have mentioned it and I missed it, but there is Gorilla Glue and there is Gorilla Wood Glue.

Short story long...

Gorilla Wood glue (in my opinion) is awesome. Limited clamping time makes it perfect for building cabinets. I assemble a cabinet with gorilla wood and biscuits or pocket screws and it works great. Building a whole kitchen full of cabinets or entertainment center is relatively time sensitive plus I just don't have enough clamps for all of them.

If I'm going to build heirloom furniture I'd probably go with titebond II because I expect to be patient when clamping and fastening.
What he said!
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post #12 of 30 Old 10-22-2009, 11:39 PM
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One thing GG does well is treated lumber. It is water
proof to a certain extent.

One down side I found while doing some tests
with it. It does not like shock loading. It will
stand a lot of stress, but fails when loaded
quickly.

Once opened, the bottle has a rather short
shelf life. One of those, "It was fine yesterday,
and today is is a lump."!

I really don't like the mess. You need gloves
when using it.

I like TBII And TBIII, just wash with soap and
water.

I bought a bottle for the tests and used it for
a couple projects, shop stuff, and one day it
was all white. We live in a medium damp
area and once moisture gets in the bottle
it is off and running. Time frame here was
less than a month.


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post #13 of 30 Old 10-23-2009, 02:15 PM
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GG and other polyurethane glues don't seem to hold up well to UV exposure. I used to use it all the time, without many failures, but prefer to work with Tightbond 3 these days.
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post #14 of 30 Old 10-24-2009, 09:43 PM
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One thing to note with GG Wood Glue is that it is water based, so do not use it on veneer as it will cause the wood to pucker and curl.
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post #15 of 30 Old 10-25-2009, 11:06 AM
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I don't use GG very often. One of the things I do use it for is gluing pen blanks. It works really well for gluing the brass tube it the blank. Another thing I have used it for is gluing plastic, its very well for that. Clean-up usually sucks, but overall the things I use it for, it works well.

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post #16 of 30 Old 10-27-2009, 05:30 PM
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I used GG to repair a teak trim piece and it worked quite well. I am not particularly fond of the way it expands but in this application it worked well and the expansion was not an issue.

Bill
San Antonio, TX
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post #17 of 30 Old 10-27-2009, 08:40 PM
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I've had great success using GG, especially when I was building boat docks, boat houses and piers on the local lake. Primarily I used it assembling on-site glulams for trusses. Every time I drive to town I pass a boathouse I built in 1999. The boat hangs in a sling-lift I installed in the drive-in covered slip, and the lift is attached to the site-built glulams. Those glulams are held together primarily with GG. I used plenty of lags and carriage bolts to draw the laminations together because I didn;t have enough clamps, but I guarantee you if I removed all the fasteners they would not fail.

At that time I had 11 employees working for me. Needless to say they were all screwing once the glue was applied. We misted the beams with water bottles before we poured the GG and it went pretty smooth. I've also used it in other applications but for most shop applications I use Titebond.

Rich that's a good tip. I have always sanded the glue of my fingers. I like your method better.
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post #18 of 30 Old 10-29-2009, 11:11 AM
 
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Gorilla Wood Glue was the first wood glue I used. I found that it was a huge mess but strong. After placing glue and using a ton of clamps I always had to clean up the ever expanding glue and sand it off. After purchasing Titebond II I will never go back to Gorilla Glue.
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post #19 of 30 Old 10-29-2009, 03:07 PM
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The polyurethane glues are good for somethings, like gluing wood to non-wood things, and are good for exterior uses. Messy stuff though...

Gorilla Glue now offers more than just the polyurethane glue. They have a regular wood glue, and likely other types too.
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post #20 of 30 Old 11-03-2009, 07:25 PM
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rahtreelimbs:

My understanding is the Gorilla Glue is good for materials that are different. Also it has been recommended for use on oily woods like teak. On teak, the wood must be "de-oiled' before application.

I use yellow glue for all woodwork unless the project will be subjected to a lot of moisture and for teak.

Woodie
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