Gluing up boards with high moisture content - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 15 Old 01-12-2013, 01:33 AM Thread Starter
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Gluing up boards with high moisture content

Hello everyone. this is my 1st post. I just bought a 2x6 and a 2x8 of douglas fir that I plan on on gluing up to make a small table.

Here's the problem, the 2x8 clearly has more moisture in it than the 2x6. Wood it be a grave mistake to glue these boards together, knowing that the moisture content in both boards are NOT yet equal?

Just thought of something, if gluing under current conditions is permissible, should I use my polyurethane Gorilla Glue, my Gorilla Glue for wood, or my Titebond II wood glue?

Thanks for reading and happy to be a new member,
Jay

Last edited by slicey; 01-12-2013 at 01:50 AM.
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post #2 of 15 Old 01-14-2013, 10:22 AM
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Personally I would wait. I think you're opening yourself to the possibility of warping, checking, or shrinkage depending on the percentage. If one board is 20% and one is dry at 9% this would seem potentially problematic to me. If we're talking about a difference of 10% and 9%, you're probably ok, though it wouldn't hurt to leave them in the same room for a week or two. See what they other guys with more experience have to say, though
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post #3 of 15 Old 01-14-2013, 10:23 AM
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BTW, any yellow wood glue is fine for an indoor project, and probably better than poly glue
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post #4 of 15 Old 01-14-2013, 10:41 AM
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If you glue boards of different moisture levels, you are looking to create problems since the boards will eventually get to the same moisture, but only time will tell what happens to the boards which have the most moisture to lose.

You can get warping, cracking, etc.

I would wait.

As for glues, Fine Woodworking did an article and the yellow glues came out the strongest. This is Titebond I, II or III or the equivalent in other brands.

I happen to use Titebond III. Longer working time, thicker so does not run as much and more water resistance in the bond.

For indoor use Titebond II would be fine.

I prefer the yellow glues since they are easy to clean-up. Just a damp sponge - so long as the glue has not set.

The urethane glues work, but if you get any on your hands, it is a messy clean-up and will leave black marks on the skin. This just looks ugly until it wears off.
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post #5 of 15 Old 01-14-2013, 12:16 PM
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Different moisture contents will have different rates of shrinkage and movement.
Surface of a board vs the interior of a board would likewise. I suggest you wait.
Equilibrium Moisture Content for most conifers is 12 - 14%, probably less indoors.
Once upon a time, there was a craftsman of very Fine Furniture. He bought a stack of 5cm x 5 x 60 tropical hardwood. Seemed dry enough to him. Used his band saw to prepare thinner pieces for a small table top glue up. The wood seemed a bit damp in the core of each piece. Went ahead anyway and finished the table = stunning to look at.
Lying in bed one night, he heard and felt a blast of an explosion which seemed to come from within the house. Found nothing on a house patrol. Back to bed. Several days later, he went into a spare bedroom where he had parked the new table. The table caught his eye as the top was now split with a V shaped cut, 5cm wide at the open end.
Wait, possibly.
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post #6 of 15 Old 01-14-2013, 03:35 PM
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A good story to illustrate what can happen when projects are built with wood which is not ready.

The forces which can build up as the wood shrinks due to loss of moisture are far greater than we think.
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post #7 of 15 Old 01-14-2013, 07:38 PM
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Yes, unless you need that table to eat on tonight, I would wait and let them equalize.
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post #8 of 15 Old 01-14-2013, 10:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Robson Valley
Different moisture contents will have different rates of shrinkage and movement.
Surface of a board vs the interior of a board would likewise. I suggest you wait.
Equilibrium Moisture Content for most conifers is 12 - 14%, probably less indoors.
Once upon a time, there was a craftsman of very Fine Furniture. He bought a stack of 5cm x 5 x 60 tropical hardwood. Seemed dry enough to him. Used his band saw to prepare thinner pieces for a small table top glue up. The wood seemed a bit damp in the core of each piece. Went ahead anyway and finished the table = stunning to look at.
Lying in bed one night, he heard and felt a blast of an explosion which seemed to come from within the house. Found nothing on a house patrol. Back to bed. Several days later, he went into a spare bedroom where he had parked the new table. The table caught his eye as the top was now split with a V shaped cut, 5cm wide at the open end.
Wait, possibly.
Whoever that guy was, we're all glad that you could share his experience
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post #9 of 15 Old 01-15-2013, 01:25 AM Thread Starter
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I waited over a day for replies and after no answers, I thought no one cared about my post. I went ahead with poly glue, so I think I'm screwed. Later, I also noticed that 2 of the 3 pairs of boards I glued up have the tree rings opposing each other. looking like a sin wave at the end of the newly glued up boards, rather than an 'm'.

Perhaps it's time to store that wood away and start over.

4 years of high school woodshop, 25 years ago does not make me a fine woodworker. lol

Thanks for all the replies.
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post #10 of 15 Old 01-15-2013, 01:49 AM
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I'd rip them right down the glue line, set them aside and let them equalize then re-glue them.

"Good Behavior is the last refuge of mediocrity" -- Henry S. Haskins
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post #11 of 15 Old 01-15-2013, 02:18 AM Thread Starter
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smart idea. didn't think of that.
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post #12 of 15 Old 01-15-2013, 02:34 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slicey
I waited over a day for replies and after no answers, I thought no one cared about my post. I went ahead with poly glue, so I think I'm screwed. Later, I also noticed that 2 of the 3 pairs of boards I glued up have the tree rings opposing each other. looking like a sin wave at the end of the newly glued up boards, rather than an 'm'.

Perhaps it's time to store that wood away and start over.

4 years of high school woodshop, 25 years ago does not make me a fine woodworker. lol

Thanks for all the replies.
Sometimes we're a bit slow to respond, but when we do you can end up with lots of advice. Keep an eye on your thread, someone may bring it back to life years from now. Keep us informed what happens with your top too

Dave The Turning Cowboy

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post #13 of 15 Old 01-20-2013, 08:58 AM
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+1 on ripping it back apart and waiting. As far as the rings go, there are some that recommend doing that on purpose. The theory is that since lumber will cup in different directions, the panel as a whole will stay flatter. Personally I just put 'em together whichever way looks best, making sure they are dry first. Planning for movement in your joinery and assembly is more important IMHO.
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post #14 of 15 Old 01-22-2013, 12:06 AM
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Have you considered just screwing a couple of battens across the boards to join them or is there a particular reason they need to be glued? Picnic tables are built that way. Don't have to worry about moisture content or alternating the grain. Ever.
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post #15 of 15 Old 01-24-2013, 01:46 AM Thread Starter
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Follow up to my original post. It's been 10 days since gluing up 3 separate pairs of 1-2x6 and 1-2x8 of easily noticeable, different moisture content. After those 10 days, I've not seen any visible issues in doing so. These boards have been in a room with an average temp of 60F degrees, and probably less than or equal to 30% humidity. In anyones opinion, do you think I'm out of the woods or is it still too soon to tell?
I have my 1st opportunity to use a friend's planer this sat(26th), but not sure if I should wait a little longer. I hope someone can offer some advice before this sat. thx
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