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post #1 of 20 Old 11-21-2014, 11:47 AM Thread Starter
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Question glue- sorry if it's a recurring topic

Hi,

Can someone please tell me what type of glue I would buy if I wanted to join wood with glue and screws and I never want it to come apart again without ripping the wood. I'm working with 8-ply maple & African mahogany. Cost is not an object. I don't care if it's hazardous to the skin or eyes.

I need the real McCoy.
I want the Super Super Polydent.

Thanks.
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post #2 of 20 Old 11-21-2014, 12:14 PM
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Titebond - II or III depending on working time and water resistance wanted.

http://www.titebond.com/woodworking_glues.aspx

Alexis de Tocqueville was a very smart man.
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post #3 of 20 Old 11-21-2014, 12:24 PM
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This is a pretty sticky subject. But I use Titebond for nearly everything, except guitars when I use hot hide glue. As suggested previously, go to Titebond's website for the best information regarding their selections. On indoor furniture i might use I or II depending on how much open time I need.

Those who say it cannot be done should stay out of the way of the people doing it.
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post #4 of 20 Old 11-21-2014, 08:16 PM
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First of all no adhesive is forever. If the application is kept dry any carpenters glue would be a good choice. If you have an application that is exposed to high humidity then a glue like titebond II would be a better choice or if you need one that is waterproof then one like titebond III would be better.
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post #5 of 20 Old 11-21-2014, 10:52 PM
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[QUOTE=Woodenhorse;644711]This is a pretty sticky subject./QUOTE]

That was a hilariously horrible pun.

On topic though, when it comes to PVA wood glues i seriously doubt theres much difference between any of them. I use titebond 2 for most of my stuff, but thats because its cheap and easily available. I also like the bottles. That said, i severely doubt that youre going to find Manufacture A's wood glue has twice the holding power of Manufacturer B's glue. Sure, some are water-proof or some dry different colors, but nearly all manufacturers offer the same categories. They all hold pretty much the same, and with any carpenters glue the wood will fail before the glue, in a properly done joint.

In short, grab a bottle of whatever says wood glue. As mentioned, im partial to titebond, but heck, theyre all pretty much the same

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post #6 of 20 Old 11-21-2014, 11:45 PM
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I just looked....I have 7 different types of Franklin Titebond glues.....hmmmm, probably need to use some up. Actually, I did have 8, finished of the Titebond II. I took to the habit a while ago of not trying to save cents per oz. by buying large size glues...I really like having fresh glue. Latest acquisition is an Instant Glue(think Super Glue). When I called customer service to talk about the effectiveness of the spray-on activator, he offered, and I received, a free can. I'm getting ready to adhere routed molding, about 11/16 x 1/2 to a paneled face frame. Frame is Red oak, panels are cedar with purple heart veneer, the moldings are purple heart hardwood. Absolutely no way to clamp. I have two sacrificial smaller sized face frame with panel mock-ups. Going to try the Franklin molding glue, first choice, and then test the Instant Glue. Supposedly you can spray the activator right on top of the wood and it absorbs into the wood and onto the glue. Yeah, I am skeptical too. Seems like it would evaporate way before it penetrates.

Use Hide glue for adhering temporary 1/2 baltic birch plywood blocks for clamping blocks. After clamping, i chisel down to the last ply, soak with warm water, and remove with chisel and then sand. Just got done doing that with some fairly complex mitered bracket feet for this Blanket Chest

Anyways, indoors I always used the original, sometimes still do but Franklin Titebond III is the latest and greatest. Do not use it to make wood putty, the brown color of the glue ruins the color match, lol.

Hard to go wrong with Franklin products, they have been choice of most woodworkers I know for a long time. Titebond III and oh yeah, don't clamp it so hard you squeeze all the glue out. You can get a lot of torque from a pipe clamp or parallel clamp, way more than would be required to squeeze out most all the glue. Clamp till tight, leave for more than the recommended 30 minutes....like a few hours, and don't stress for 2 days.

Good luck,

Steve
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post #7 of 20 Old 11-22-2014, 12:06 AM
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best wood glue?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43n-PP2VmLk

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
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post #8 of 20 Old 11-24-2014, 10:32 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks to all for your input. I know that you can read up on anything online, but there's nothing like getting the information straight from the horse's hoof... I mean mouth.
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post #9 of 20 Old 11-24-2014, 10:37 AM
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I use titebond 2 on almost everything. The stuff is great!! Titebond 3 for outdoor stuff.

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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post #10 of 20 Old 11-24-2014, 10:38 AM Thread Starter
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[QUOTE=Steve S.;644849]
Titebond III and oh yeah, don't clamp it so hard you squeeze all the glue out. You can get a lot of torque from a pipe clamp or parallel clamp, way more than would be required to squeeze out most all the glue. Clamp till tight, leave for more than the recommended 30 minutes....like a few hours, and don't stress for 2 days.

Steve,

Do you recommend screwing after the glue cures, or maybe screwing until snug, then torquing after the cure?

I'll be using a self-tap wood screws with pilot holes.
Thanks!
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post #11 of 20 Old 11-24-2014, 10:51 AM
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A good glue joint doesn't need screws. A glued joint is stronger than the wood itself if done right.

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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post #12 of 20 Old 11-24-2014, 12:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan50hrl View Post
A good glue joint doesn't need screws. A glued joint is stronger than the wood itself if done right.
might be a true statement, but "stronger than the wood" is an awfully big caveat. a screw will still strengthen the joint, steel > wood.

Assuming the joint needs that strength of course...
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post #13 of 20 Old 11-24-2014, 12:21 PM
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used the hide glue to glue up a project with many parts, for the slower setting time. worked ok until i got the project back- glue joints had failed from I think too much moisture where it was.

won't use that again. need to find another slow setter.
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post #14 of 20 Old 11-24-2014, 12:22 PM
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I only use Titebond Original, unless of course I will be building a boat.

Pure mathematics is, in it's way, the poetry of logical ideas. - Albert Einstein.
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post #15 of 20 Old 11-24-2014, 12:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimPa View Post
used the hide glue to glue up a project with many parts, for the slower setting time. worked ok until i got the project back- glue joints had failed from I think too much moisture where it was.

won't use that again. need to find another slow setter.
Titebond III has a 20 minute or so working time. OK for darker woods, or where glue joints don't show, or parts to be stained dark. Waterproof too.

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post #16 of 20 Old 11-24-2014, 12:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bauerbach View Post
might be a true statement, but "stronger than the wood" is an awfully big caveat. a screw will still strengthen the joint, steel > wood.



Assuming the joint needs that strength of course...

Small steel piece....vs huge surface area of wood being glued. Also that steel is only as strong as the wood holding its threads.

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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post #17 of 20 Old 11-24-2014, 05:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimPa View Post
used the hide glue to glue up a project with many parts, for the slower setting time. worked ok until i got the project back- glue joints had failed from I think too much moisture where it was.

won't use that again. need to find another slow setter.
Titebond 2 extend. All the fun of titebond 2 with an open work time of 30 minutes, if I'm remembering correctly

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post #18 of 20 Old 11-24-2014, 06:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan50hrl View Post
Small steel piece....vs huge surface area of wood being glued. Also that steel is only as strong as the wood holding its threads.
yep, I dont disagree. depends on the situation. Sometimes there isnt alot of surface area to glue, or the leverage on the joint could be an issue.

Ive broken glue joints (on purpose), and yeah, it tears the surface of the wood. Ive never manage to break a joint that had a screw in it.

Im talking about butt joints, or even dado joints. I wouldnt expect an issue with a finger joint or something.
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post #19 of 20 Old 11-25-2014, 10:44 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bauerbach View Post
yep, I dont disagree. depends on the situation. Sometimes there isnt alot of surface area to glue, or the leverage on the joint could be an issue.

Ive broken glue joints (on purpose), and yeah, it tears the surface of the wood. Ive never manage to break a joint that had a screw in it.

Im talking about butt joints, or even dado joints. I wouldnt expect an issue with a finger joint or something.
Yeah guys,

I am afraid in this instance the screws are necessary because I have a tiered lap joint with cantilevered loading elements. I was going to screw the top one and just glue the bottom because when the connection is screwed it will pull on the dowel creating a downward force on that lap. The force on the slotted piece is purely lateral.
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post #20 of 20 Old 11-25-2014, 11:50 AM
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Screw whatever you like....but I maintain that proper designs, construction, and materials yield better results with out mechanical fasteners. And yes...I still screw things together for shop jigs and cabinets, but not on fine furniture.

The tools don't make the craftsman....
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