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post #1 of 14 Old 05-29-2012, 06:26 PM Thread Starter
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glue choice help

I have three boards off and old horse drawn buggy that have cracked from being dropped. they will fit back together nicely like a finger joint. I need to find out whick glue would be better to use. I think either tite bond hide glue, polyurethane, or should I use a structural epoxy?
Please forgive me if I left any info out.
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post #2 of 14 Old 05-29-2012, 07:00 PM
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Is it load barring? Does it just stay in a certain location? Is it a panel or side that is going to be handled..ie taken on and off?
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post #3 of 14 Old 05-29-2012, 07:18 PM Thread Starter
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this is an unusual buggy. I have not been able to find any info on it but the bottom that the seat sets on has about a dozen pieces running front to back evenly space to support the seat and I guess load. the seat sets in the middle of them both front to back and left to right. with cross tiea about every 16 inches to tie all the slats together. So to answer you question, yes it is load bearing.
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post #4 of 14 Old 05-29-2012, 08:34 PM
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Ok so with that said, I would suggest just going with tite-bond or equivalent type of adhesive. My reasoning is because it sounds like these boards are laying in a flat orientation and are used more for spacing rather than handling the load. It would seem as though there are, or should be, other boards underneath that actually carry the load. Or you could just make new boards and distress them to "almost" match.
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post #5 of 14 Old 05-29-2012, 09:25 PM Thread Starter
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they do actually carry the load of the seat and driver and baggage. nothing else supports that. then these set on the springs that attach to the axles
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post #6 of 14 Old 05-29-2012, 11:11 PM
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I'm having dificulty understanding the application. If the boards are to be glued end to end than it can't be glued. If it is to be glued side to side and kept out of the weather than I would use a carpenter's glue like original titebond yellow glue. If it is being kept outdoors than I would use titebond III or weldwood resorcinol glue.
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post #7 of 14 Old 05-29-2012, 11:24 PM Thread Starter
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ok thanks
I would attach pics but can't figure out how to add them.
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post #8 of 14 Old 05-30-2012, 01:07 AM
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post #9 of 14 Old 05-30-2012, 01:45 AM
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An exterior rated yellow glue, is probably your best bet. Titebond makes one that will work well. The other option would be a polyurethane such as Gorilla Glue. The Gorilla Glue will need to be clamped really tightly to give a good bond. The advantage of the Gorilla Glue is that it is completely waterproof once it cures. Hide glue is definitely not a good option, as it is not waterproof.

Now, I have to ask: Are you sure it is worth the effort to glue these back together? They failed from being dropped. Which would imply that they are old enough to have dried out, and developed small stress cracks. Which leaves them brittle and prone to failure.

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post #10 of 14 Old 05-30-2012, 01:58 AM
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Are these the ones?
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post #11 of 14 Old 05-30-2012, 09:05 AM Thread Starter
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Thanks for the info. Found the way to post pictures. THis is likely not to be kept outside where it would be exposed to wet conditions. What about the structural epoxy I found that is supposed to have 7000 psi breaking strength.
I was only able to upload one. It keeps telling me there is an upload failure on the others
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post #12 of 14 Old 05-30-2012, 09:43 AM
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IMO, the way the pieces are broken, even with a good fit, no glue would be fail safe. The breakage looks like it will fit perfectly, but that type of repair does not favor end to end attachment.

You could create a scarf cut, or half laps with an added brace mortised in, but my senses tell me that making new pieces would be the way to go.





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post #13 of 14 Old 05-30-2012, 10:31 AM
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If it were me I would glue the part back together to use as a pattern to make a new one. Anything you could glue that together with will only have a fraction of the strength it had before it broke. The only way you could get away with repairing that part is if the buggy was parked and never used.
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post #14 of 14 Old 05-31-2012, 04:43 PM
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Agree that the piece is best replaced

This is not really a glue selection. As the other replies state, the nature of the break means even the strongest glue - epoxy - would not have enough strength due to the break line.

As another person stated, gluing this back together is most useful as a template to make a new piece.

You could try gluing reinforcing pieces on either side, but this will not be as strong as a replacement and would look ugly, even if painted.
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