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post #1 of 9 Old 10-04-2013, 06:13 PM Thread Starter
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Glue

I what type if glue does everyone like or use? Kind of a weird subject but it's probably the most used item in the shop. I'm still kind of trying them all out. So far I've used titebond and gorilla wood glue. Any differences between titebond and titebond II? What wood glue do you guys think is the best?
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post #2 of 9 Old 10-04-2013, 07:25 PM
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See the discussion on differences of the different Titebond glues in the General forum - happening right now.

I've always used TB II, but I'll probably get some TB III to use as we move into fall/winter (lower chalk temp/longer open time).

Never used gorilla glue so can't comment on it.

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post #3 of 9 Old 10-04-2013, 07:46 PM
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I don't like Gorilla Glue, and don't use it. Depending on the project and materials, I might use TB II or III. Or, a urea-formaldehyde glue, hide glue, or an epoxy.






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post #4 of 9 Old 10-05-2013, 12:26 AM
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Almost of my work is furniture. I find that TB-III works for almost everything. For some of the really weird and off the wall applications, I find Lexel is better than a silicone glue.

And like Mike, I don't care for the urethane glues.

BTW - If the surfaces are properly prepared, the fit is snug but not tight, the joint is clamped for an hour or two and the joint is allowed to cure for 24 hours or so, I doubt that you'll find any difference in the strength of the joint.

While the usable life of TB original can be decades, TB-III gets funky after 3 or 4 years.

Use the right tool for the job.

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post #5 of 9 Old 10-05-2013, 12:53 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rrich
Almost of my work is furniture. I find that TB-III works for almost everything. For some of the really weird and off the wall applications, I find Lexel is better than a silicone glue. And like Mike, I don't care for the urethane glues. BTW - If the surfaces are properly prepared, the fit is snug but not tight, the joint is clamped for an hour or two and the joint is allowed to cure for 24 hours or so, I doubt that you'll find any difference in the strength of the joint. While the usable life of TB original can be decades, TB-III gets funky after 3 or 4 years.
I've been using tb original recently. I mainly make jewelry boxes and other indoor products. If it last longer I may just stick with that
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post #6 of 9 Old 10-05-2013, 08:32 AM
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I make segmented bowls and just use plain old yellow glue and have not had any problems even with bowls 10 years old. They don't have to take much stress but the joints are stronger than the wood anyway, except maybe for the hardest woods.

You can never have too much pepperoni on your pizza or own too many clamps.
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post #7 of 9 Old 10-05-2013, 08:45 AM
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Different glues exist for different applications. titebond 1 is the hardest modern glue. It's great for furniture, but not great for things that will be exposed to water. It is hard so it doesn't absorb shock like gorilla glue would. Titebond 2 is just like 1 except not as hard but much more water resistant. 3, i believe is just even more soft, yet even more water and temperature resistant.

for musical instruments or things that you would like to come back apart for maintenance, the hardest glue that exists is a well made hide glue. It is not heat or water resistant, and luthiers like it that way. Just a little steam and the joint can be pried open. it also wipes very cleanly with a wet and warm rag and won't penetrate to ruin your finish. it also has the ability to be made on any part of the globe locally, organically, and easily.

tite bond original is a very good replacement for hide glue. it doesn't give up the seam very easily, but it is almost as hard as hide glue to let the vibrations transfer from each part of the instrument.

Last edited by johnmark; 10-05-2013 at 08:48 AM.
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post #8 of 9 Old 10-05-2013, 08:24 PM
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I pretty much use TB II. Get a gallon and I am good for a long time
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post #9 of 9 Old 10-05-2013, 10:47 PM
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The only carpenters glue I've noticed any difference in is Elmers. It seems too thin and I've had some joints fail so I don't buy it anymore. The different types of titebond are differences in water resistance. The original being the least water resistant and the titebond III being waterproof for exterior use. Under dry conditions all would work fine. I use gorilla glue sometimes but not as a replacement for wood glue. It's more similar to Great Stuff expansion foam insulation. I use it more for construction where an added adhesive helps like if you were fastening wood to concrete. Even if the glue was as strong, it's too nasty to use on cabinets or furniture the way it swells out of the joint.
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