Getting glueable edge on 4Ēx4Ē pine post - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 9 Old 03-30-2018, 01:58 PM Thread Starter
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Getting glueable edge on 4Ēx4Ē pine post

Hey guys - Iím new to the forums here. Only been diving into the world of Woodworking for a few months now.

Wanted to see if anyone had a good recommendation for getting a straight and glueable edge on a 4x4 pine post. Picked em up cheap from Loweís and want to join 3 of them together to make a entryway tabletop.

Iím not as concerned with flattening, as I can do that with my router and flattening jig.

I donít have a jointer. I tried using a table saw jig, but my blade would only come up about 3.5Ē, and with the added height of the board the jig creates, I couldnít get it to work. I tried doing one side then flipping it over and doing the other, but that didnít seem to work. I have an okay table saw but not a prograde one (think itís ~$200 SKILSAW).

The straight bit on my router is only about 2Ē deep and I havenít seen one for sale thatís over 3Ē long. So the options Iíve seen that use a router wonít work either (from what I can tell)

The length of each board is about 4í.

Any advice? (Other than just buying a jointer?)

Thanks!
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post #2 of 9 Old 03-30-2018, 02:49 PM
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Table saw seems like the best method, if you can get more than 2" on the first pass, just flip the timber and do the other side.

Another thing to consider: If the router bit is 2" deep - how deep can you get it when you set it to it's full plunge depth? If using a hand router, you'll want to work in passes anyways. Perhaps with the router bit fully extended you can work you way to 4"?

Or, again, just flip the timber and do 2" on the other side.

Or use a bench plane to get a flat edge.
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post #3 of 9 Old 03-30-2018, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyoung723 View Post
Hey guys - Iím new to the forums here. Only been diving into the world of Woodworking for a few months now.

Wanted to see if anyone had a good recommendation for getting a straight and glueable edge on a 4x4 pine post. Picked em up cheap from Loweís and want to join 3 of them together to make a entryway tabletop.

Iím not as concerned with flattening, as I can do that with my router and flattening jig.

I donít have a jointer. I tried using a table saw jig, but my blade would only come up about 3.5Ē, and with the added height of the board the jig creates, I couldnít get it to work. I tried doing one side then flipping it over and doing the other, but that didnít seem to work. I have an okay table saw but not a prograde one (think itís ~$200 SKILSAW).

The straight bit on my router is only about 2Ē deep and I havenít seen one for sale thatís over 3Ē long. So the options Iíve seen that use a router wonít work either (from what I can tell)

The length of each board is about 4í.

Any advice? (Other than just buying a jointer?)

Thanks!
First, what is the source for these 4x4's?

Unless you have produced them yourself, or they are custom cut, you are likely dealing with commercial 4x4 material, which by nature is not going to be a good product to glue up. Even if you get a "glueable" edge on them it is very likely you will be back here in a few months asking why your top cracked apart.

Just my .02....
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post #4 of 9 Old 03-30-2018, 06:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dyoung723 View Post
Hey guys - Iím new to the forums here. Only been diving into the world of Woodworking for a few months now.

Wanted to see if anyone had a good recommendation for getting a straight and glueable edge on a 4x4 pine post. Picked em up cheap from Loweís and want to join 3 of them together to make a entryway tabletop.

Iím not as concerned with flattening, as I can do that with my router and flattening jig.

I donít have a jointer. I tried using a table saw jig, but my blade would only come up about 3.5Ē, and with the added height of the board the jig creates, I couldnít get it to work. I tried doing one side then flipping it over and doing the other, but that didnít seem to work. I have an okay table saw but not a prograde one (think itís ~$200 SKILSAW).

The straight bit on my router is only about 2Ē deep and I havenít seen one for sale thatís over 3Ē long. So the options Iíve seen that use a router wonít work either (from what I can tell)

The length of each board is about 4í.

Any advice? (Other than just buying a jointer?)

Thanks!
A jointer would be the best tool. If that isn't an option a hand plane would do the job.
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post #5 of 9 Old 03-31-2018, 06:18 AM
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Take them to a cabinet shop in your area and ask how much they would charge to joint them.

George
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post #6 of 9 Old 03-31-2018, 07:33 AM
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Dry fit them & see how far off they are now.

Or, rather than glue, you could drill holes through them all and bolt them together with ready rod. Finish it off by countersinking the ready rods and plugging the holes with pine plugs. Then run over the whole thing with a belt sander. No glue joints to fail.
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Last edited by pro70z28; 03-31-2018 at 07:43 AM.
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post #7 of 9 Old 03-31-2018, 10:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pro70z28 View Post
Dry fit them & see how far off they are now.

Or, rather than glue, you could drill holes through them all and bolt them together with ready rod. Finish it off by countersinking the ready rods and plugging the holes with pine plugs. Then run over the whole thing with a belt sander. No glue joints to fail.
I think this is a much better route to take, and works better with the dimensional lumber you are using.

I'd route v-grooves between the 4x4's, and route a bevel on all sides of the ends. I wouldn't plug the countersink, I would use a plated flat washer and acorn nut instead. With the right metal base that would make a cool looking table.
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post #8 of 9 Old 03-31-2018, 12:02 PM
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I local store sells threaded rod in various lengths and thicknesses which would be ideal. Very good idea.
johnep
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post #9 of 9 Old 04-02-2018, 03:47 PM
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I would think you could use the tablesaw with a sacrificial fence. Basically, drop the blade, attach some MDF/ply/pine to the fence, run it up to just barely over the edge of the blade, then slowly raise the blade with the saw running to let 1/32" or so of the blade fit cut into the sacrificial fence. If you can raise the blade to 2" off the table, you can then make two passes, flipping the wood the long way in between.

Other than that, I'd use either an electric planer (think "lunchbox planer"), or a jointing plane. I'd go with the hand plane, but only because I don't have an electric one.

No matter what you're doing, make sure the wood is dry first. 4x4 posts where I am are sometimes wet enough to drip when you cut into them. It's almost like working with green wood in a lot of ways.
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