Filling a swimming pool - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
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post #1 of 11 Old 02-12-2018, 06:39 AM Thread Starter
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Filling a swimming pool

I have recently de-commissioned (professionally) a 6m x 4m indoor swimming pool in my home and want to use the room for accommodation (2 bedrooms, a study, a bathroom and a small sitting room). I shall use stud-partitioning but first I must fill the void. It varies from 5'6" to 4' in depth and is entirely made of concrete which has been tiled. I want to use some sort of constructed wood 'trestles' to support the floor joists (C16 structural grade timber) which would be 170 x 75 with 400mm centres across the width of the area. I have removed the edging tiles from the pool area which were slightly raised and will incorporate that area with the flooring grade chipboard. Building Control are happy with my approach but have added that I also need to vent the area.

Can you help with the 'trestles', 'venting' and general advice?

Last edited by bobswan; 02-12-2018 at 07:00 AM. Reason: Insufficient description
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post #2 of 11 Old 02-12-2018, 06:52 AM
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I think that will be more weight than your floor can handle even if you re-enforce it. You might get an engineer there on site which can really give you an answer but I don't think it can be done. My instincts are the area where it sits you need to cut the floor, framing and everything out and either pour a concrete footing or something with steel framework to set it on.

Last edited by Steve Neul; 02-12-2018 at 09:45 AM. Reason: typo
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post #3 of 11 Old 02-12-2018, 08:00 AM
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Meters... 6m X 4m ?

The opening is roughly 3.2 X 6 = 19.2 ft by 3.2 X 4 = 12.8 ft ... no big deal. Floor trusses which can support normal living space loads, which you need to determine with a licensed contractor, are common in either length. Running them the short length would be my suggestion and spacing them 12" on center will insure a structural unit, probably overkill. You might partner up with a contractor who will agree to supervise your construction methods if you want to do that portion yourself... I donno?

Additionally, filling the opening with dry sand would provide support and possibly reduce the need for venting. A Visqueen cover and 2" foam over the sand would add insulation. A thin layer of sand on top will hold it in place. This is the method I used to insulate my concrete slab under my first floor. Again, a contractor will provide the best advice for your situation. We are mostly woodworkers, but some of us have some building experience and our opinions are just that....

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)

Last edited by woodnthings; 02-12-2018 at 08:02 AM.
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post #4 of 11 Old 02-12-2018, 10:54 AM
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You want to put this, (2 bedrooms, a study, a bathroom and a small sitting room), in a 6m by 4m space? What size people are going to use this?

That is the size of a small bedroom with attached small bath. Did you specify your dimensions correctly? If those sizes are correct then as Woodsnthings said normal joists should be sufficient.

George
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post #5 of 11 Old 02-12-2018, 11:18 AM
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You want to put this, (2 bedrooms, a study, a bathroom and a small sitting room), in a 6m by 4m space? What size people are going to use this?
Wee little people...
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post #6 of 11 Old 02-13-2018, 10:32 AM
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Bobswan, I would like to advise you to drill several holes in the bottom of the pool before you do anything else. Your pool is like a large boat, ready to float when water gets under it. That only happens when the pool is empty. By drilling holes, you will allow water to enter and not lift the pool, which could be why the tiles were higher in the first place. I worked at a equipment rental store, and had panicked customers, when after pumping out a concrete pool, it started floating...and the only way of getting it to sink was to drill holes quickly with a lg hammer drill to let the water into the pool. When a pool is to be left and buried, the bottom should be removed for that reason.
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post #7 of 11 Old 02-13-2018, 11:13 AM
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Bobswan, I would like to advise you to drill several holes in the bottom of the pool before you do anything else. Your pool is like a large boat, ready to float when water gets under it. That only happens when the pool is empty. By drilling holes, you will allow water to enter and not lift the pool, which could be why the tiles were higher in the first place. I worked at a equipment rental store, and had panicked customers, when after pumping out a concrete pool, it started floating...and the only way of getting it to sink was to drill holes quickly with a lg hammer drill to let the water into the pool. When a pool is to be left and buried, the bottom should be removed for that reason.
One time one of my buddies drained his pool in the winter so he wouldn't have to heat it, when spring rolled around we had a huge rain storm and his hysterical wife called him while we were ont he job together, we went and looked and the pool was floating in his back yard about 5-6 feet off the bottom.

We didn't know what to do I just told him to let it drain out and settle back down so that is what he did, but it didn't land exactly where it was and was about a foot too high on one end. Then the fiasco set in, he had financed the house with the pool so it had to be fixed, the home owner ins wouldn't cover it because it was rising waters, it ended up costing them twice as much as a new pool as they had to have the old one jack hammered up removed and rebuilt

And the royal pi$$er was after the new had worn off the pool before it floated, nobody every used it anyway, but he had to fix it

There is no app for experience
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post #8 of 11 Old 02-13-2018, 07:08 PM
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We were warned of the floating pool risk a few years ago when we had to have our pool drained and re-plastered. Fortunately the work was completed quickly and the pool re-filled before anything bad could happen. It is real.
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post #9 of 11 Old 02-14-2018, 11:19 AM
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If it were me, I’d want to get the old pool out of there.

Without regard to the pool, I’d think your joists need to carry whatever span they’re bridging regardless if there’s an abandoned pool under it or not (and I’d vote for not). I wouldn’t feel comfortable counting on the pool walls to act as foundation piers.
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post #10 of 11 Old 02-14-2018, 02:15 PM
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I think you should make a trip down to the building department at your city hall, not sure about indoor pools, but I do know that in my area there are specific procedures that have to be followed to decommission an outdoor in ground pool.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

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post #11 of 11 Old 02-14-2018, 03:52 PM
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We were warned of the floating pool risk a few years ago when we had to have our pool drained and re-plastered. Fortunately the work was completed quickly and the pool re-filled before anything bad could happen. It is real.
In this area a pool would never be drained without first sinking many wellpoints around it.

George

Last edited by GeorgeC; 02-14-2018 at 05:22 PM.
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