Face Gluing - Planer or Jointer - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 1Likes
  • 1 Post By GISer3546
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 11 Old 11-24-2015, 10:59 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 4
View penpoint's Photo Album My Photos
Face Gluing - Planer or Jointer

Hi All. I have a piece of stock that I have split with a band saw and am looking to face glue the two pieces back together. Would it be better to plane the face of each piece or use a jointer?

Thanks for any insight.
penpoint is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 Old 11-24-2015, 11:39 AM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 4,394
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
What size are they? Was the board flat/perpendicular prior to resawing? What type of wood? Photos?

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel and Instagram
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is offline  
post #3 of 11 Old 11-24-2015, 11:54 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 4
View penpoint's Photo Album My Photos
Hello David. Thanks for the reply. The wood is a piece of 5/4 S2S red oak. It was flat and square prior to cutting. It is 15 " long. I split it into two pieces length-wise, so I now have 2 pieces that are 15" long x 2" wide x 7/16" thick. I want to face-glue them back together and the faces of the pieces are rough from the band saw blade. Just want to know the best method to create flat, smooth, and square pieces for gluing. Thanks again.
penpoint is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 11 Old 11-24-2015, 12:16 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 12,326
View GeorgeC's Photo Album My Photos
I cannot think of any reason why it would matter which machine. I would probably use my jointer just because I can probably control the depth of cut easier and more accurately.

George
GeorgeC is offline  
post #5 of 11 Old 11-24-2015, 01:18 PM
Wood machinist
 
difalkner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: NW Louisiana
Posts: 4,394
View difalkner's Photo Album My Photos
Then if the opposite side is good like you say I would use my planer on the resawed side. That will ensure the board parallel in thickness. It's possible to throw that off using the jointer if your technique or machine isn't setup precisely. I say planer.

David

Curly Wood Shop on Etsy
David Falkner - Woodworking YouTube channel and Instagram
Our music at church - current videos Airline Baptist BC Facebook Live
Romans 3:23
difalkner is offline  
post #6 of 11 Old 11-24-2015, 07:15 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 148
View Tman1's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
Originally Posted by difalkner
Then if the opposite side is good like you say I would use my planer on the resawed side. That will ensure the board parallel in thickness. It's possible to throw that off using the jointer if your technique or machine isn't setup precisely. I say planer.
+1, I was thinking the exact same thing.
Tman1 is offline  
post #7 of 11 Old 11-24-2015, 07:38 PM
where's my table saw?
 
woodnthings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: SE, Michigan
Posts: 27,125
View woodnthings's Photo Album My Photos
me also ....

Quote:
Originally Posted by difalkner View Post
Then if the opposite side is good like you say I would use my planer on the resawed side. That will ensure the board parallel in thickness. It's possible to throw that off using the jointer if your technique or machine isn't setup precisely. I say planer.

The good side always goes down on the planer bed. Done. Jointers don't make parallel faces, as a rule, unless you are lucky and have a perfect resaw.

What I don't get is why you split them, then decided that was a bad idea and now want to glue them back together....? If you want to create more interest, add a thin piece of a different color/type of wood in the center.

The answer to your question will only be as detailed and specific as the question is detailed and specific. Good questions also include a sketch or a photo that illustrates your issue. (:< D)
woodnthings is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to woodnthings For This Useful Post:
OnealWoodworking (11-24-2015)
post #8 of 11 Old 11-24-2015, 10:52 PM
Senior Member
 
BernieL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Greenville NH
Posts: 1,399
View BernieL's Photo Album My Photos
Yes difalkner - if your original stock was square, then use the square uncut side down on the planer table. If you try the new cutside down on the jointer, you will only make that side flat and it may not be square like woodnthings explained.

Its' never hot or cold in New Hampshire... its' always seasonal.
BernieL is offline  
post #9 of 11 Old 11-25-2015, 11:02 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 4
View penpoint's Photo Album My Photos
Quote:
What I don't get is why you split them, then decided that was a bad idea and now want to glue them back together
Actually, I didn't decide it was a bad idea (though it may have been). I'm trying to make a magnetic tool or knife holder with the magnets hidden. I split the stock, routed a slot for the magnets, and then I will glue the two pieces back together. I'm just trying to determine the best method to make sure the face of each pieces is flat and even for the gluing.

I guess I could route the front of the original stock instead of splitting it, insert the magnets, and use some thin wood to glue over that for the front. Would that be better, you think?

Either way, thanks to everyone for the feedback and suggestions. Everything helps.
penpoint is offline  
post #10 of 11 Old 11-25-2015, 11:54 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 5,652
View FrankC's Photo Album My Photos
If your bandsaw cuts were clean the two parts should fit when glued back together without any further work on them.

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something -Plato

FrankC
http://sawdustmaking.com
http://woodworkerglossary.com
FrankC is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to FrankC For This Useful Post:
woodnthings (11-25-2015)
post #11 of 11 Old 11-29-2015, 06:59 PM
Senior Member
 
GISer3546's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 504
View GISer3546's Photo Album My Photos
I did something similar recently and used a planer with good results. Those being only 2" wide you should be able to do it by hand as long as the surfaces are square.
Attached Images
   
regesullivan likes this.

Last edited by GISer3546; 11-29-2015 at 07:26 PM.
GISer3546 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ideas on infeed jig setup for my Dewalt 734 planer Danny870 Power Tools & Machinery 40 12-01-2015 07:15 AM
New shop advice, jointer or planer Ant Power Tools & Machinery 27 10-18-2015 11:10 AM
Squaring up wood Noek General Woodworking Discussion 25 10-07-2015 12:47 PM
Jointer woes Froglips Power Tools & Machinery 37 09-19-2015 09:13 AM
Hand Power Jointer or Planer for Shaving Door Edges engelstine Power Tools & Machinery 18 08-21-2015 03:58 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome