excess glue removal - Woodworking Talk - Woodworkers Forum
 
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post #1 of 19 Old 10-03-2008, 08:35 PM Thread Starter
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excess glue removal

How do I remove/eliminate excess glue so that the wood will take stain and or finish without the area showing a different color?
Thanking in advance,
Laurence
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post #2 of 19 Old 10-03-2008, 10:18 PM
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Wipe down or peel.

If you have to glue and run, wipe down the glue area with a wet rag and get it all up when it is still wet.
If you intend to be around for a while, you will reach the point where the excess glue will congeal and you can peel it off with a razor or knive in one easy stroke.
If it hardens, you are screwed. Just be prepared for a lot of scraping and sanding.

It's best to not get too much glue on the surfaces and not have much squeeze-out. The amount of glue you use will be gained from experience, but it's not much. I carefully apply the glue with acid brushes and dont make much of a mess at all. You will have to be careful that you dont starve the glue joint either. Keep in mind that your normal yellow glue works best at only about 2/1000 inch thick.
Some people use masking tape along the joint area.

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Last edited by Tony B; 10-03-2008 at 10:49 PM.
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post #3 of 19 Old 10-03-2008, 11:18 PM
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Glue it, let it dry, sand it off. If you don't use gobs of glue and get excessive squeeze out you shouldn't have any problems. Using wet rags to wipe it off while it is wet is good on closed grained woods, open grained woods might get the wet glue pushed into its pores and cause more problems that can't be sanded away.

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post #4 of 19 Old 10-03-2008, 11:53 PM
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If I get squeeze out on the outer edge, I usually take a wet sponge and deal with it immediately. If it's on the inside of a joint, I wait until it's dry and use a scary-sharp chisel to remove it.
Having a small bucket of clean water and a clean sponge ready before you even start the process is important.

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post #5 of 19 Old 10-04-2008, 12:35 AM
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I use Gorilla Glue on almost everything. There is no room for error. You wipe it off when it's wet or you live with it dry.

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post #6 of 19 Old 10-04-2008, 08:00 AM
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I think that Tony B stated what I do pretty well.

Inside corners are the hardest. There I use a screw driver blade wrapped in a wet rag to remove as much as possible.

Otherwise, as already stated, if it dries then it is sand, sand and sand some more.

George
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post #7 of 19 Old 10-07-2008, 05:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeorgeC View Post
I think that Tony B stated what I do pretty well.

Inside corners are the hardest. There I use a screw driver blade wrapped in a wet rag to remove as much as possible.

Otherwise, as already stated, if it dries then it is sand, sand and sand some more.

George
An alternative to sanding is a scraper. Properly hooked it will clean up glue nicely. Used very carefully, it is possible to remove just the glue. I use magnifying glasses for this part just to be sure I don't get carried away and take too much off.
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post #8 of 19 Old 10-07-2008, 06:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Handyman View Post
I use Gorilla Glue on almost everything. There is no room for error. You wipe it off when it's wet or you live with it dry.
Everytime I have used gorilla glue I always end up with a foamy mess. I use titebond III on everything. Why do you prefer the gorilla glue?
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post #9 of 19 Old 10-07-2008, 08:21 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks for all your replies.

These forums are great.

Laurence
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post #10 of 19 Old 10-07-2008, 09:24 PM
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I usually let the glue set up for a little bit (become gummy) before I take a simple paint scraper and scrape it off. I do not wipe the glue at all. After the glue has completely hardened, I do a good sanding, and then the wood is ready to be finished. Iím afraid of doing just what you state, smearing the glue further into the wood and not getting it off. What a way to wreck a beautiful piece. Red

PS. I just posted this for another post, so I just pasted it here also.

Red
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post #11 of 19 Old 10-07-2008, 09:37 PM
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gorilla glue vs titebond

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Originally Posted by djonesax View Post
Everytime I have used gorilla glue I always end up with a foamy mess. I use titebond III on everything. Why do you prefer the gorilla glue?
Gorilla Glue is a polyurethane adhesive. It actually does two things: first, as you mentioned, it foams and second, it sticks stuff together. The advantage of these two properties is that they will fill in gaps and stick. Polyurethane glues are water reactive. Add slight moisture and it will consume the water as it cures. Consume is the wrong word but it will do for now. The trick here is that the glue uses water to assist with its curing. Once cured it can be, and often is, used out of doors in damp environments. I do clamp them with heavy clamps. The foaming action is quite strong and will separate a joint that is not supported. I made a post of 2x4s and stuck them together with a polyurethane glue. It will probably outlive me. One of my tricks is that I have a 2" putty knife and I've sharpened it so it will really cut. I allow the foam to cure and then cut the residue off with my putty knife. I don't wait for it to get hard before I cut. If it gets hard on you, get ready to do some serious scraping. Take a Lee Valley scraper, develop a good hook and carefully start working it.

Titebond is an
aliphatic resin glue. It will stick stuff together. Titebond III is a waterproof glue. It will stick stuff together and, once cured, will stick, even "under water." Clamps are recommended for a Titebond joint. It cures in part from evaporation. The Titebond won't expand in the same way that the polyurethane glue will. Instead, the Titebond will "lubricate" the joint until the evaporation is complete. The clamps are needed to "control" the joint until the glue cures.

I hope this helps.

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post #12 of 19 Old 10-10-2008, 04:32 PM
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Titebond III, never use the gorilla glue.

I've used the making tape to prevent it, chisels, scrapers and sandpaper to get the spots I missed after a pass with a wet rag.

As stated, once you get a feel for how much glue is needed, this becomes far less of a problem.
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post #13 of 19 Old 10-12-2008, 11:42 AM
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..... I'll chime in on the side of those who flush/wipe it off with a wet rag. Been doing it for years and never a problem - outside or inside corners too.
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post #14 of 19 Old 10-12-2008, 12:44 PM
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The best tip I can give for removing excess glue from interior corners is to use plastic drinking straws. When you push the corner of a drinking straw into the corner of a project it will conform to the shape of the corner. Push it along the corner and all the glue will be pushed into the straw. You can then cut the glue-filled end off and do another corner with the same straw. You should still wipe down with a wet cloth afterwards but this gets the bulk of it off to reduce the mess.

Ken

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post #15 of 19 Old 10-13-2008, 12:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Johnson View Post
The best tip I can give for removing excess glue from interior corners is to use plastic drinking straws. When you push the corner of a drinking straw into the corner of a project it will conform to the shape of the corner. Push it along the corner and all the glue will be pushed into the straw. You can then cut the glue-filled end off and do another corner with the same straw. You should still wipe down with a wet cloth afterwards but this gets the bulk of it off to reduce the mess.
brilliant!
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post #16 of 19 Old 01-01-2009, 05:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken Johnson View Post
The best tip I can give for removing excess glue from interior corners is to use plastic drinking straws. When you push the corner of a drinking straw into the corner of a project it will conform to the shape of the corner. Push it along the corner and all the glue will be pushed into the straw. You can then cut the glue-filled end off and do another corner with the same straw. You should still wipe down with a wet cloth afterwards but this gets the bulk of it off to reduce the mess.
Best tip of the month! If I was a woodworking mag editor I would give you a free tool or something! Thanks, I'm definitely going to try that next time I do a glue up!
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post #17 of 19 Old 01-07-2009, 10:49 PM
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brilliant!
+1 Very nice.
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post #18 of 19 Old 01-15-2009, 09:39 AM
 
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Yes to the wet rag method b4 it dries,and thanks for the tip on the drinking straw Iwill try that next time.
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post #19 of 19 Old 01-16-2009, 12:42 PM
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Like everyone else I keep a plastic tub of water and a rag and sponge handy when I'm gluing up a piece. If I'm smart enough to see I'll have a hard to reach inside area I try to tape it up with the blue stuff before assembly. Also spread the glue with an acid brush or whatever you prefer.

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